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I don't see much posted on run flats. Has anyone tried them on their Bolt or heard of them being used? We have them on our Mini Cooper and are pretty happy with them (saved my wife once).

Randy
 

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I don't see much posted on run flats. Has anyone tried them on their Bolt or heard of them being used? We have them on our Mini Cooper and are pretty happy with them (saved my wife once).

Randy
They can be used on the Bolt, but you'll drop range because they're not an LRR tire :nerd:
 

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I don't understand the value of run flats considering they wear faster, cost more, weigh more, perform worse, and sometimes cannot be repaired after a puncture.

A plug kit costs $5, and a cheapo tire inflator at Harbor Freight maybe $10, or you could get CO2 cartridges. Plugging a tire takes 3 minutes. The other 5% of issues that cause a tire to go flat that a plug kit cannot fix will require a tow.

If venturing outside of cell service far from civilization, you're better off having a spare tire.

Taking live fire from the enemy is a good reason to have run flat tires.
 

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I don't understand the value of run flats considering they wear faster, cost more, weigh more, perform worse, and sometimes cannot be repaired after a puncture.

A plug kit costs $5, and a cheapo tire inflator at Harbor Freight maybe $10, or you could get CO2 cartridges. Plugging a tire takes 3 minutes. The other 5% of issues that cause a tire to go flat that a plug kit cannot fix will require a tow.

If venturing outside of cell service far from civilization, you're better off having a spare tire.

Taking live fire from the enemy is a good reason to have run flat tires.
The tires on the Bolt are also self sealing. It sounds like the OP is unaware of this.
I always keep a tire plug kit in all my vehicles and on all my motorcycles too.
Being able to fix a flat on the backroads is necessary when riding a motorcycle :nerd:

He's looking to keep his wife from being stranded. I would buy a spare tire/wheel
and keep it in the back with a tire plug kit and pump.
I doubt you'll really need it, but it will serve the purpose you're looking for and the
plug kit can be used for the larger holes that the sealing goo isn't capable of plugging.
Running run flat tires is overkill, IMO! You'll kill the best part of an EV :eek:
 

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I haven't carried a plug kit in my car in decades. Seem to recall that they won't internally patch the tire if you install a plug. I've slept a whole bunch of times since then and don't recall if that's just my imagination or not. I do remember having someone else install a plug and had it blow out at highway speed. Sounded like someone shot the car. Wasn't pleased changing the tire in the middle of nowhere in the dark. Have always had my tires patched after that experience.
 

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The glovebox plug kits are meant to get you off the side of the road, to home, or to the tire shop. Its not meant to be a replacement for a real patch job. Tire shops can remove a plug and install a permanent patch.

I agree run flats are not very good. You're paying a comfort/performance/economy penalty every single mile driven for something that may or may not happen. Something that is easily taken care of even if it does happen.

Some of the spare wheel/tire combos I've weighed are like 25 pounds and very narrow. That in your trunk shouldn't be too much a hit on anything. I'd have preferred one in my Bolt but I may just run a full sizer instead.
 

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Anecdotal evidence being nearly worthless; I've never had an issue with the nearly dozen plugs I have installed. I consider them to be a permanent repair. They shouldn't pop out unless the hole is too large, or it was improperly installed. That said, I have never attempted to repair a hole bigger than the size of the ream tool. The only non-pluggable puncture I've had was a 9mm bullet lodged into the steel belt of the tread. Fortunately the leak was slow enough that I was able to drive down from the logging road and back home.

I too consider a plug kit essential motorcycle equipment when running backcountry roads. I now remove spare tires from my vehicles and just have a plug kit and pump. Plugging is faster than changing a wheel, and is a permanent solution despite the legal disclaimers stating otherwise. I'm not likely to need a spare tire, and if I do, then I'm likely within an hour of someone who can bring one to me. Finally, Uber and Lyft are all over the place where I live, so it's nearly impossible to get stranded.
 

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I have run every car/truck and motorcycle tire ever plugged to the end of it's life without a problem. Whoever did the crap job of plugging your tire that failed, shouldn't be allowed to touch tools, IMO!

Tire plugs work great if you know how to use them. I've had to plug 100 plus tires (mine and other peoples) in my lifetime and have yet to have an issue. I ride some very high performance machines with big horsepower that are very fast!!!!

Tire plugs are not the problem.

It's the Goober using the tools to install the plug and botching the job..:eek:
 

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Nice lookin' Bimmer, Dr.

Nice to hear your extensive experience with plugs has been as positive as mine...

The reason I'm interested in EVs (and the Bolt in particular) is due to my inclination towards efficiency. I find plugs to be time efficient, cost efficient, and weight/space efficient.

Run flats are superior in time efficiency, but then quickly fall behind if you factor in waiting for a repair at a tire shop in the instances where a plug could have fixed it in 5 minutes.

I haven't had any experience with run flats, so I am curious to hear anecdotes from those who have used them.
 

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Nice lookin' Bimmer, Dr.

Nice to hear your extensive experience with plugs has been as positive as mine...

The reason I'm interested in EVs (and the Bolt in particular) is due to my inclination towards efficiency. I find plugs to be time efficient, cost efficient, and weight/space efficient.

Run flats are superior in time efficiency, but then quickly fall behind if you factor in waiting for a repair at a tire shop in the instances where a plug could have fixed it in 5 minutes.

I haven't had any experience with run flats, so I am curious to hear anecdotes from those who have used them.
They're stiff, heavy and expensive. Most regular tire shops wont deal with them because it takes a special machine and tech to handle them without damaging high dollar wheels. IE Lambo's, Ferrari's, ETC!
The stiff sidewalls and low profiles are difficult to deal with and not everyone can handle them without damaging something. It's a high stakes game dealing with exotic car tires and wheels :eek:
 

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Seem to recall that they won't internally patch the tire if you install a plug. ... I do remember having someone else install a plug and had it blow out at highway speed. ... Have always had my tires patched after that experience.

I have had one flat tire on my Bolt (3 weeks ago). I drove on 6 psi to a gas station (thank you Sheetz for free air) and refilled it to 38 psi. I could not feel a nail/screw. The pressure held steady for 5 miles of driving then began falling. I got to the tire shop with <10 psi. I then saw/felt a piece of metal protruding from the tread. I told them it was a self-sealing tire. The tech removed the wheel from the car and the tire from the rim. We could not feel it through the sticky goop opposite the tread (not the sidewall) of the tire. THEN they told me they CANNOT place a patch in a self-sealing tire. He pulled out the 1.25" x 0.25" (tapered to a point) piece of steel. He remounted the tire on the rim & filled it with air. I have been driving on it without ANY noticeable or pressure-sensor measurable leak ever since. Lesson: You cannot patch the self-sealing tires found on your Bolt. The OM (pp. 289-95) shows that they originally planned to provide a "Tire Sealant and Compressor Kit" (specific cutouts in the black styrofoam base of the trunk well). My guess is that when they went with the self-sealing tires, the Kit went by the wayside! I did buy a 12-volt air compressor (Home Depot, $25) and small (5-inch, $5) needle-nosed pliers to carry back there also.
 

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Lesson: You cannot patch the self-sealing tires found on your Bolt.
While I can understand that an internal patch would have an impossible time sealing against the film of sealant goop in the tire, I would think that that a gummy-worm plug, put in from the outside could work well, since the vulcanizing fluid would be making a seal with the side-walls of the puncture channel.

I too have used gummy worms successfully many times on a motorcycle. And I prefer to have a shop put in the internal mushroom plug that CHP uses on its bikes.

Being a belt & suspenders kind of guy, the Bolt now has stock tires, a 60 psi donut spare, a gummy-worm puncture repair kit, and a 12V tire compressor.
 

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THEN they told me they CANNOT place a patch in a self-sealing tire.
...I can understand that an internal patch would have an impossible time sealing against the film of sealant goop in the tire
This is not true. See this post for the official instructions from Michelin for repairing the self-sealing tires. I recommend that every Bolt owner print these out and keep a copy in the glove compartment in case a tire shop tells them they can't fix the tire.

The OM (pp. 289-95) shows that they originally planned to provide a "Tire Sealant and Compressor Kit" (specific cutouts in the black styrofoam base of the trunk well). My guess is that when they went with the self-sealing tires, the Kit went by the wayside!
I believe this kit can be ordered as an accessory. It came as standard (both the compressor and the can of sealant) on Canadian Bolt - so I'm assuming that it's on the Canadian standard equipment list just as the DC fast charger is.
 

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I have had one flat tire on my Bolt (3 weeks ago). I drove on 6 psi to a gas station (thank you Sheetz for free air) and refilled it to 38 psi. I could not feel a nail/screw. The pressure held steady for 5 miles of driving then began falling. I got to the tire shop with <10 psi. I then saw/felt a piece of metal protruding from the tread. I told them it was a self-sealing tire. The tech removed the wheel from the car and the tire from the rim. We could not feel it through the sticky goop opposite the tread (not the sidewall) of the tire. THEN they told me they CANNOT place a patch in a self-sealing tire. He pulled out the 1.25" x 0.25" (tapered to a point) piece of steel. He remounted the tire on the rim & filled it with air. I have been driving on it without ANY noticeable or pressure-sensor measurable leak ever since. Lesson: You cannot patch the self-sealing tires found on your Bolt. The OM (pp. 289-95) shows that they originally planned to provide a "Tire Sealant and Compressor Kit" (specific cutouts in the black styrofoam base of the trunk well). My guess is that when they went with the self-sealing tires, the Kit went by the wayside! I did buy a 12-volt air compressor (Home Depot, $25) and small (5-inch, $5) needle-nosed pliers to carry back there also.
My premier came with self sealing tires and the compressore with the goop in the trunk.... I am in Canada Eh!
 
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