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self sealing vs spare vs fill kit

10137 Views 124 Replies 40 Participants Last post by  Blackmax
Hello, I'm curious to know what more experienced bolt owners are doing for the possibility of a flat tire. I've had my 23 bolt for a couple of months, and this is the first time I've ever driven a car without a spare. It's a little unnerving, especially because I live a very rural area. In about a month I'm putting on winter tires that are not self sealing, and that makes it even weirder to be driving around without some way of fixing a flat.

I pulled up the rear cargo area false floor, pulled out the styrofoam cradle for the charging cord (which isn't in there anyway, it's in my garage) and it looks like there's enough room for some sort of spare. Anyone know more about that? Fitting a jack and tire iron in there might be a different story. I've also thought about the sealer/compressor route, but I don't know anything about how well they work.

Any comments/advice are really appreciated, thanks!
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I have a compact spare with a jack and a tire iron underneath the sub floor plus a tire inflator. I replaced my OEM Michelin with Michelin CC2 which came with road hazard insurance. Every flat I've had were sidewall punctures that can't be repaired. It's just easier to just mount a compact spare and then get my tire replaced later.
If you've picked up a screw, nail or other piece of metal in the tread of a tire, I highly recommend the Nealey Tire Repair Kit. I came across this when researching spare tires and finding the few times I tried to use a standard rope repair kit frustratingly hard to use.
That looks really promising to me. I visited the site and the only thing is that it says it doesn't work well in cold weather. Anyone have an opinion about that? The repair kit, a jack, and a small 12V compressor might be the overall best answer for me.
The Canadian Bolt EV comes with a portable inflator. And self sealing "goo" that goes with the pump. It works great. But take care not to rub the sidewall to anything, it will pretty much ruin it and well, no inflator will help you. Ask me how I know it 馃檲馃檲
Luckily it happened about 2 years ago and the dealership I went to had some Bolt EV in stock, and he gave me one of their tires and ordered a new one to replace the one he gave me. It was a Friday afternoon and I was 130 miles away from home.

And yes, a portable inflator is great to have.
Just ordered the inflator kit that fits in the lower trunk cutouts. Might never need it but good to know it鈥檚 there!
Just ordered the inflator kit that fits in the lower trunk cutouts. Might never need it but good to know it鈥檚 there!
From where?
After reading all the different approaches to this issue, I think the one that makes the most sense for me is to buy a rim and donut spare and a S-10 Jack that we鈥檒l toss in the back if we are going more than an hour from home otherwise it will stay home in the garage. If we get a flat locally we can have someone bring it to us or wait for roadside and have them tow us to the house where I鈥檒l put it on.

Blacklabtire1 on eBay will get me whatever size spare I ask for. Can someone please tell me what diameter 17鈥 donut spare I should get for a 2022 EUV? Does it need to be a special rating to handle the weight? Also what bolt pattern? If I remember correctly, the scissor Jack from an S-10 has the correct nub on it that mates up with the indentation on the suspension where we should be jacking up from. Please correct me if I鈥檓 wrong.

Sorry for all the questions and thanks in advance for your help. Just want to get this right since I鈥檓 ordering it.
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From where?
Standard part available from Chevy. Includes a cheap compressor and the fixer stuff. Not cheap, but Chevy's at least isn't an aerosol can like the auto parts places carry, so it probably keeps longer in storage and is safer to leave in the car.
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I did ask salesman about that GM compressor and can o goop. He ran out and returned with it in hand. I know it is a bit unsafe but I keep a can of goop. Not sure why really. It's buried in back. My other cars keep a 12V compressor that has been a life saver more than a few times. Must weigh 3 pounds or less. Maybe $35 online best rated gizmo.
From an old tire guy, if you use the "can-o-goop", have the repair done at a tire shop you will never visit again. That stuff makes a huge mess, which they have to clean the entire area after dismounting the dead tire.

As to anyone who is considering run-flat tires, ride in a Bolt with them mounted first. The Bolt is about the worst-riding car we've ever owned. Run-flats make even a good-riding car seem like it's gone bad. I can't imagine how bad would be a Bolt with run-flats.

jack vines
Some of the goop is supposed to be tpms safe but I would or may need to use it as last ditch.
As to anyone who is considering run-flat tires, ride in a Bolt with them mounted first.
To avoid any potentially expensive misunderstandings among readers of this thread, the Michelin Energy Saver self-seal tires that come with the Bolt are not run-flat tires. If you get a puncture that the self-seal goop doesn't seal and the tire looses pressure, you cannot drive on it.
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I read a news article that suggested that one ought to drive on a flat tire and ruin the rim to get off the side of the road due to the statistical risk of being run into.
I read a news article that suggested that one ought to drive on a flat tire and ruin the rim to get off the side of the road due to the statistical risk of being run into.
You can buy rim saver tires with thick sidewall that will sacrifice themselves to save your rims and allow you to drive to safety.
I read a news article that suggested that one ought to drive on a flat tire and ruin the rim to get off the side of the road due to the statistical risk of being run into.
The side of the road is never very far away - if you drive slowly and carefully it would probably avoid damaging the rims much, if at all.
I'd have a hard time wrecking a rim but I guess it's better than dead.
I have seen those tires. Saw one gizmo that was like an inner tube safety inside tire. An elderly lady my wife knows drove on her rims for maybe 100 feet. A few scratches but dealer put new tires on.
I was able to score a new GM sealant and compressor kit for under $80 on eBay so I鈥檒l throw that in the back as some level of assurance. Obviously not going to help with a blowout or sidewall tear but better than what I have now which is nothing.

Does this really make sense what with the self seal tires?

Ended up canceling this purchase as it seemed redundant what with the self seal tires.
I was able to score a new GM sealant and compressor kit for under $80 on eBay so I鈥檒l throw that in the back as some level of assurance. Obviously not going to help with a blowout or sidewall tear but better than what I have now which is nothing.

Does this really make sense what with the self seal tires?
Well on the Bolt, you do have the TPM System. I have had 4 punctures in the last 10 years and the TPMS has provided ample warning in all 4 cases.

In one other case, I ruined the rim as well as the tire and the spare was flat too. It was also pouring rain. I was sort of glad I had an excuse to call AAA.

Oh, while trying to use the compressor in a GM kit, I connected things up wrong and emptied the goo onto my garage floor.

I now just forget about what might happen and try to pay attention. LOL
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I ended up getting a new 16鈥 steel rim and new tire, mounted and balanced from Tire Rack. Had to call and speak with an associate to place the order but well worth it. All in, $199 with me picking it up at the local TR depot. Bought a Jimmy jack from a boneyard for $35
Jack and breaker bar with 3/4鈥 socket and Jack fit easily into the styrofoam area. Tire fit snugly into the next level up. False floor fits over the tire just fine. Tire, rim and jack come in just under 50 lbs so no issues with the extra weight. Like having my grandson in the backseat. I like knowing that we will be able to deal with a flat and not have the limitations that come with using a donut spare.
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What is your opinion on this one:

The kit comes with Spare tire & wheel, sets of bolts or nuts, torx key and a wheel carrying bag.
I ended up getting a new 16鈥 steel rim and new tire, mounted and balanced from Tire Rack. Had to call and speak with an associate to place the order but well worth it. All in, $199 with me picking it up at the local TR depot. Bought a Jimmy jack from a boneyard for $35
Jack and breaker bar with 3/4鈥 socket and Jack fit easily into the styrofoam area. Tire fit snugly into the next level up. False floor fits over the tire just fine. Tire, rim and jack come in just under 50 lbs so no issues with the extra weight. Like having my grandson in the backseat. I like knowing that we will be able to deal with a flat and not have the limitations that come with using a donut spare.
Any chance you can post details of the tire / rim combo from TireRack?
What is your opinion on this one:

The kit comes with Spare tire & wheel, sets of bolts or nuts, torx key and a wheel carrying bag.
What is your opinion on this one:

The kit comes with Spare tire & wheel, sets of bolts or nuts, torx key and a wheel carrying bag.
seems like an expensive version of a donut spare.
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