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I read a lot about turning off Auto Climate Control, not using heat, A/C, keeping below the speed limit, turning off the radio and screen etc. Mostly to the point of increasing range.

But is there anything more to it? Will driving conservatively, not using all the accessories, prolong battery life? Will the other parts of the car last longer?

I ask, because my daily commute is 12 miles. If I go a little further, I may drive 20 miles a day. And I think I've only ever used a fast charger once in a year - and that was getting the car home from the dealer 300 miles away. My office has free Level 2 charging. And the car is owned by GM (it's a lease)

In my situation, what REAL benefit will I derive not driving the car in a way that is comfortable to me?
 

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Drive it like you want. No need to be conservative with it or drive it abnormally for the use case you have. It has plenty of range to cover that sort of distance.
There are a lot of people on this forum and other EV forums who obsess about efficiency, and others who are at the limit of the car range so have to think about it a bit more. For most people this will not be a concern.
 

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I used to "play the mileage game", trying to maximize my miles/kWh. Then I decided the car has around 240 miles range if charged to full and realized the distance all the way across my state is 220 miles, with many chargers in between. Why am I being uncomfortable? So I set the climate to what I wanted and didn't worry about it.
Note that I did turn off auto defrost because it made the heat or A/C come on when I didn't want it to, which made me uncomfortable.
 

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A lot of people think because you drive a EV you must do things "differently". Unless you want to play the hyper-mile game just for fun, I say treat your Bolt like any other car. We do. Use the climate control when you feel like it. Run whatever (legal) speed you want to. Watch your battery level like you would a gas gauge - fill up when you need to so you always have a nice reserve in the "tank". We played around with the 1-pedal driving mode for a while, but decided we are more comfortable using both pedals, so that's what we do. For us, it's just a regular car that happens to use a different type of fuel. Others should DWMYH.
 

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A lot of the efficiency game came into play from lower range EVs like the original Leaf, the Chevy SparkEV, and the Fiat 500e.

I'm still driving my 500e as a daily driver. I'm well aware that if I drive it at 78 on the highway with the heat blasting that I would soon be on the side of the road with no power. I have no such worries with either the Bolt or the ID.4 in our stable. Those I drive normally as each has power to last all day.

ga2500ev
 

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A battery fails by many many things. One might save a very small bit if they reduce the loads and the amount of current being drawn such as rabbit starts. If you want to you can do all those things and not really enjoy it. You can easily have a comfortable drive and not damage the battery. Look up all the reasons a battery wears out and reduce them if possible.

I had an i3 and need to drive 70 miles a day. It was an exersize in extreem effeciencies to get it to go that far. It wasn't fun in winter as I was generally unwilling to use the gas generator. Seemed to be silly. So I'd freeze.
The Bolt would be much nicer to have a time setting to have it warmed or cooled at some departure time. You should let your AC warm up the car before you venture. I'd also say you ought to use onstar or fob to warm it up when you want to return.
I set my charge limit to 70% in summer and 80% in winter.
 

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A battery fails by many many things. One might save a very small bit if they reduce the loads and the amount of current being drawn such as rabbit starts. If you want to you can do all those things and not really enjoy it. You can easily have a comfortable drive and not damage the battery. Look up all the reasons a battery wears out and reduce them if possible.

I had an i3 and need to drive 70 miles a day. It was an exersize in extreem effeciencies to get it to go that far. It wasn't fun in winter as I was generally unwilling to use the gas generator. Seemed to be silly. So I'd freeze.
The Bolt would be much nicer to have a time setting to have it warmed or cooled at some departure time. You should let your AC warm up the car before you venture. I'd also say you ought to use onstar or fob to warm it up when you want to return.
I set my charge limit to 70% in summer and 80% in winter.
I haven't done it myself, but apparently the MyChevrolet app integrates with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa. You might be able to create a schedule there...?
 

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I read a lot about turning off Auto Climate Control, not using heat, A/C, keeping below the speed limit, turning off the radio and screen etc. Mostly to the point of increasing range.

But is there anything more to it? Will driving conservatively, not using all the accessories, prolong battery life? Will the other parts of the car last longer?

I ask, because my daily commute is 12 miles. If I go a little further, I may drive 20 miles a day. And I think I've only ever used a fast charger once in a year - and that was getting the car home from the dealer 300 miles away. My office has free Level 2 charging. And the car is owned by GM (it's a lease)

In my situation, what REAL benefit will I derive not driving the car in a way that is comfortable to me?
Drive the car as you like, don't mind all the stuff you mentionned above. As long as your round-trip commute is inside the projected range, don't bother at all with the AC/speed limit and all other stuff.
Something I learnt since I got my Volt in 2014 : playing the game "how to get the best range" isn't everything.
In fact, it is a little childish, IMO. Just drive the car as you like. You only have to know what impacts the range and what to do when your Bolt EV posted range doesn't match what you need to get to the next charger or destination.
 

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I read a lot about turning off Auto Climate Control, not using heat, A/C, keeping below the speed limit, turning off the radio and screen etc. Mostly to the point of increasing range.
This is the way to drive a car that has problems, is on its last leg, or an experimental car. Drive it the way you want. Enjoy it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Why would you do that stuff unless you need the extra range to make it to a charger? Turn the heat on and be comfortable.
 

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Should I drive and use my Bolt like a normal car?
Definitely not. Normal cars are lame and the Bolt is so much better and will do many things normal cars won't. To limit oneself to normal norms misses out on the best features of the Bolt.

No restrictions, heated socks or hair shirts necessary for happy Bolt utilization. There is an internet forum for each and every human interest, action and device. On every forum are the lunatic fringe who will obsess over the minutae and take it to the outer limits of possibility, just because the outer limits are their natural habitat. The good thing is they define the extremes; knowing the extremes helps avoid them.

For the rest of us Bolt owners, we plug in every night to Hilltop Reserve, precondition every morning, leave the climate control on Auto, use the heated seats, heated steering wheel, lock the car and leave the HVAC on while running quick errands and never give a thought or a worry about the battery. We'll be getting another one soon and that one will have a warranty.

jack vines
 

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I read a lot about turning off Auto Climate Control, not using heat, A/C, keeping below the speed limit, turning off the radio and screen etc. Mostly to the point of increasing range.

But is there anything more to it? Will driving conservatively, not using all the accessories, prolong battery life? Will the other parts of the car last longer?

I ask, because my daily commute is 12 miles. If I go a little further, I may drive 20 miles a day. And I think I've only ever used a fast charger once in a year - and that was getting the car home from the dealer 300 miles away. My office has free Level 2 charging. And the car is owned by GM (it's a lease)

In my situation, what REAL benefit will I derive not driving the car in a way that is comfortable to me?
Driving that short of a distance there's not enough energy usage for the climate settings to matter. Personally, I turn the heater off for the simple reason that I'm not cold... I turn it on if the windows are fogging.

As far as prolonging battery life, I charge my Bolt to 80-85% typically. The coolant system is supposed to do a good job, and I don't want to be caught in an unexpected situation or power outage with a charge lower than that.
 

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There is no such thing as a “normal” car. A car is a car. Just drive it as any sane person would. Just because it has a battery instead of a tank of explosive liquid makes no difference.
 
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The Bolt would be much nicer to have a time setting to have it warmed or cooled at some departure time.
Agreed....that was the favourite feature on my Fusion Energi...set it and forget it and the car was always ready to go.
I just assumed the Bolt did the same and was surprised to find out it did not.
 

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Conversely, I picked up an ice cream cake from DQ on a really hot day in June ‘19 and had the A/C blasting full-tilt on my way home. Using one-petal driving, I crested a hill, lifted-off the accelerator, and poof, blew the main fuse.

Of course the fuse recall came out about two-weeks later, but it goes to show our choices matter in ways we can’t always predict.
 

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I have a two step process I use with the EVs I've owned, including the Bolt.

(1) Set the charge limit to 80 to 85% or turn on hilltop reserve so I'm not always charging to full (better for the battery).
(2) Drive it like I stole it.

:)

Mike
 

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If you are not chirping the tires off the line every time then you are missing out. Put it in L and Sport mode, and have fun with the 1 pedal. And yes my 2013 Leaf, I was using no heat, speed limits, whatever needed to meet my commute, the appeal of the Bolt was abundant range to leave climate control on Auto, and drive as I like.
 
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