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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 2020 bolt and drive 160 miles round trip 3 days a week and 188 the other 2 days. Should I 100% charger every night? Or would 80% be good enough. I live in central Missouri I'm anticipating 100% in the winter months for sure to complete my trips. Any thoughts or opinions welcome.
 

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Oh, you will get plenty of thoughts and opinions on that subject. Some of them backed up with lots of "scientific data". But, in the end, they are all opinions.

Did you read your Owner's Manual front to back? What does it say about charging the battery?

FWIW - I charge our 2019 BOLT to 100% every night regardless of how many miles it has been driven. But that's just my "opinion" on how to do it.
 

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There are a lot of varying opinions. I don’t have the techie background some people have, but I only charge to 80% most days. I don’t hesitate to charge to 100% if I need it (say for long trip or winter).

You'll see people saying to not charge over 80% because supposedly it helps lengthen the number of charges / slows degradation.

But always charge enough to make sure you can safely get to your destination.

Even Elon Musk have weighed in on this.
29315
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lol true TexBolt I did read the owners manual a while back if remember correctly it didn't say to only charge to a particular %. I was just curious how this might impact rang over time. Thanks for your input
 

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Key is don't be above 80% or below 20% for extended period of time.
For the high end, just set departure charging so the highest charge needed is reached a little bit before you leave.
For the low end, you can set the Bolt to charge up to 40% immediately when you get home.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Key is don't be above 80% or below 20% for extended period of time.
For the high end, just set departure charging so the highest charge needed is reached a little bit before you leave.
For the low end, you can set the Bolt to charge up to 40% immediately when you get home.
This is some great advice I have read in the manual about it but wasn't for sure if it was better for departure time or to get back to full charger faster. I will set departure time up before I head out today thank you.
 

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It depends on how long you plan on keeping your car. In general, don't charge to 100% unless you need the range. Here's some good discussions on the subject:

Look at post #2 in this link:
 

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The Bolt EV traction battery (2017) has a nominal voltage of 355 VDC and a nominal capacity of 57.9 kWh. The battery consists of 288 cells. Each cell nominally has 3.7 VDC and holds 0.20 kWh. Three cells, wired in parallel, constitute a group, which also has a nominal voltage of 3.7 VDC. There are 96 (288/3) groups. The groups are voltage balanced by the Battery Management Module (BMM). These 96 groups are organized into 10 modules. Eight modules have 10 groups (30 cells each; 240 cells total) and two modules have 8 groups (24 cells each; 48 cells total). The BMM sits atop modules 5 & 6 at the rear of the battery.

Battery degradation is a decrease in the kWh a cell can store. Degradation is not shared equally by the cells (or groups). Voltage degradation also occurs but is detectable a little later. Battery degradation is not displayed on the dashboard as a decrease in the percentage of the battery (State of Charge - SoC) which is filled. This will always read 100% on a full charge. Degradation only presents to the driver as fewer (“Guess-o-Meter” - GoM) range miles provided by the SoC. This range is very dependent on the four “T”s: Temperature {outside}, Terrain, Technique, and Temperature {control setting}.

Without an On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) device, determination of battery degradation is very hard, if not impossible.
 

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"Without an On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) device, determination of battery degradation is very hard, if not impossible."

Agreed.

And, until we have actual documented evidence of Bolt battery degradation due to different charging regimes, then all these theories about what is best for your Bolt battery are just...opinions. I totally support the right of every owner to have a opinion, no matter how misguided it may be.

I'm only talking about Bolt batteries - not Volt batteries, or Leaf batteries, or Tesla batteries. Just 2017 or newer Bolt batteries.

If I persist in charging our 2019 Bolt battery to 100% every night, and keep the car for 10 years, then at the end of that time our battery will have suffered some percentage of degradation. This is a indisputable fact: a 10 year old battery will not be as strong as a new battery.

If we then compare our Bolt's battery to another 10 year old Bolt's battery that has been religiously maintained and never charged over 80%, there MAY be some detectable difference in capacity.

How much difference? Nobody knows, yet, cuz nobody has owned a Bolt for 10 years.

Will it be ENOUGH of a difference (when all other variables have been ruled out) that I will give a hoot? I seriously doubt it...but I could be wrong.

We'll see!
 

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Here is another way of looking at this question:

Say your particular driving habits and customary automobile usage allow you to get along fine by just charging the Bolt battery to 80%. That means that for all normal situations, you only need 80% of the range built into your Bolt. It doesn't bother you a bit to customarily leave 20% of the available range on the table.

So then let's assume that you had (instead) always charged your Bolt battery to 100%, even if you didn't need the additional range. Because of doing this, at the end of 10 years, your Bolt's battery had lost 20% of rated capacity. What difference would it make to you? You never needed more than 80% of the battery capacity anyway.

Stressing over how much to charge the Bolt battery seems kinda silly to me. I charge to 100%, and don't worry about it. But that's just me, and it's just my O-pinion.

Cheers!
 

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So here's MY opinion - A completely full battery makes deceleration in L something rather muted or nonexistent until you've gone a few miles, and since I drive in L exclusively, I never charge fully for this reason. plus, supposedly, it's good for the reasons everybody else says.
 

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I second Pigwich; I always leave some space for full regen braking. But I noticed even at 100% charge there is still some regen braking after backing out of the driveway.

Enjoy your car and worry less about what may happen in 10 years. ;)
 

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If I happened to be driving in L mode and (for whatever reason) the regen braking was insufficient to stop the car, then I would use the brake pedal. Problem solved.

Even if you "drive in L exclusively" it's probably a good idea to exercise the brake pedal once in a while, just so you remember where it is. Muscle memory and all that.

Plus, it keeps the dirt and rust cleaned off the brake rotors...so they will hopefully work better in a EMERGENCY braking situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This is about what I expected and wanted a wide variety of opinions thanks so far for everyone's input. I do intend to put as many miles as possible on the little car. I currently drive 858 miles a week. Just shy of 45k a year. I like and respect everyone's thoughts some jump out more than others TexBolt has some good thoughts and is kinda the way I was leaning before I proposed the question. Do we have many high mileage bolts here close to or over 100k? I'm interested in their practices.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Forgot to mention regen braking is not needed for the start of my trips I get on the highway almost as soon as I head out. I have found 65mph in a 70mph is the best speed for 3.8 to 4.0 mkh for this spring temps. This will be for another thread later.
 

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This is about what I expected and wanted a wide variety of opinions thanks so far for everyone's input. I do intend to put as many miles as possible on the little car. I currently drive 858 miles a week. Just shy of 45k a year. I like and respect everyone's thoughts some jump out more than others TexBolt has some good thoughts and is kinda the way I was leaning before I proposed the question. Do we have many high mileage bolts here close to or over 100k? I'm interested in their practices.
The highest mileage Bolt I know of is Eric Way (newscoulomb) and he abuses his battery pretty bad (lots of driving to low SOC and DCFC'ing) and has very little degradation.

Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I follow him on YouTube and have seen he had one over 100k he has good videos although he does a lot of charging station reviews that would only interest folks that are in his area.
 

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IMHO the best advice is: If you need to charge to 100% to deal with your daily driving, do it and don't sweat it. If you don't, then don't.

Be ready to change your habits in the winter - you may need a higher charge when it gets cold even if you don't need it in the summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks Sean I plan on installing a lvl 2 charger for home charging before winter,so cold weather charging should be easier. As for now I do believe I will continue to 100% charge. Because I do believe chevy is under specking the true battery capacity so 100% isn't truly 100%. I think it was p7wang that had a breakdown of this in another post.
 
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