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I recently purchased a 2020 bolt and drive 160 miles round trip 3 days a week and 188 the other 2 days. Should I 100% charger every night? Or would 80% be good enough. I live in central Missouri I'm anticipating 100% in the winter months for sure to complete my trips. Any thoughts or opinions welcome.
Go ahead and charge to 100% GM engineering has confirmed the car is designed to be charged to 100% daily. some people like to have immediate regenerative braking in which case you can change the charge level. 95% will allow you full region from the start of your drive. I always charge to 100%
 

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I recently purchased a 2020 bolt and drive 160 miles round trip 3 days a week and 188 the other 2 days. Should I 100% charger every night? Or would 80% be good enough. I live in central Missouri I'm anticipating 100% in the winter months for sure to complete my trips. Any thoughts or opinions welcome.
There are a lot of opinions, but little data in the Bolt community. There is a lot more data in the Tesla community. I own both. I have a 2019 Bolt as my daily car, and a 2018 Model 3 that my wife drives and that we take on trips. Based on information from the Tesla side (including from Elon) charging time 90% as a standard charge is encouraged. 100% charge is fine provided you do not let it set at that level for extended time. Also, per the information again from the Tesla side (1 million cars of experience) taking the battery very low is ok, again provided you do not leave it there. Get it back over 20%. This is my opinion based on the data I have read from the Tesla data.
 

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One thing we know for certain. Charging below 100% won't hurt your battery unless doing so consistently causes the charge to go low, say below 40%. On the other hand charging to 100% all the time may appreciably degrade the battery over time, but we really don't know for certain. Feeling lucky? Not keeping it past 3years, so you don't care anyway? Have range anxiety or unexpected side trips on occasion? I think this is totally a personal decision and there is no one correct answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Of course I think about this a lot and today a thought came across my mind. I will try to stagger the charge from week to week like.. week 1 charge to 100% every night ,week 2 charger to 80%, week 3 90%... or something like this. Anyone try this yet?
 

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I drive about 4K miles per year at this point, and at my age, the Bolt will last longer than me, 80% or 100% charge. It's a moot point, though I haven't seen convincing evidence, one way or the other.

I do hope the 12v battery is getting charged when the big battery is getting wall-charged. That will go long before the big battery. They did in my two Priuses.
 

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Of course I think about this a lot and today a thought came across my mind. I will try to stagger the charge from week to week like.. week 1 charge to 100% every night ,week 2 charger to 80%, week 3 90%... or something like this. Anyone try this yet?
You are way overthinking this. Much of battery charging folklore comes from Leafs, which had terribly unreliable batteries. The cause of that unreliability was heat, not overcharging.

There simply has not been enough time or enough Bolts to have any consensus on the effect of anything on battery degregation. It is likely that you will have gotten rid of the car before any effect of any type of charging regimen becomes apparent on the state of the battery.

Keep it simple and consistent. In general lithium batteries that are a bit undercharged tend to last longer. So if you can operate everyday at 90%, just set it to 90% and leave it alone. It's more important to have a consistent routine that works for you as opposed to wondering if some regimen is going to have impacts 10 years from now.

ga2500ev
 

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I try to keep my cars between 30 to 70% state of charge.

But if I had to drive 188 miles daily I would set the charger to finish charging at 90% at time of departure for sure to minimize how long it stays at the high SOC.

There is absolute proof that keeping a lithium battery at higher SOC will decrease its life cycle.

Also fact is that the degradation in the battery will not affect many people since they do not need the full range very often.

A Model X owner on TMC aims to keep his all-electric SUV for up to 20 years and he decided to reach to Dahn for advice on daily charging to optimize the battery pack longevity. The researcher responded:
“I would recommend charging to 70% normally. When you need a long trip, charge to 100%.”


Charge level *(V/cell)​
Discharge cycles
Available stored energy **
Table 4: Discharge cycles and capacity as a function of charge voltage limit. Every 0.10V drop below 4.20V/cell doubles the cycle but holds less capacity. Raising the voltage above 4.20V/cell would shorten the life. The readings reflect regular Li-ion charging to 4.20V/cell.
Guideline: Every 70mV drop in charge voltage lowers the usable capacity by about 10%.

Note: Partial charging negates the benefit of Li-ion in terms of high specific energy.

* Similar life cycles apply for batteries with different voltage levels on full charge.

** Based on a new battery with 100% capacity when charged to the full voltage.
[4.30][150–250][110–115%]
4.25200–350105–110%
4.20300–500100%
4.15400–70090–95%
4.10600–1,00085–90%
4.05850–1,50080–85%
4.001,200–2,00070–75%
3.902,400–4,00060–65%
3.80See note35–40%
3.70See note30% and less
 

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GM with "normal" degradation will only replace batteries that have lost 40% or more of capacity. Sometimes you just get unlucky and get a pack that will degrade faster. I baby my cells as much as possible. The science behind cycling Li-ion cells is well documented. I'd hope you can charge at both ends of yourd drive
 

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Discussion Starter #29
GM with "normal" degradation will only replace batteries that have lost 40% or more of capacity. Sometimes you just get unlucky and get a pack that will degrade faster. I baby my cells as much as possible. The science behind cycling Li-ion cells is well documented. I'd hope you can charge at both ends of yourd drive
Indeed I do teaser I have not mentioned this at all as of yet. I as my name states am a photographer.I do internet photography for car dealers. 2 of which are chevy dealers and I am allowed to plug in most days when they are not being used or blocked by an ice vehicle. So basically I use from a full charge depending on other variables 6 to 8 bars of the 20 one way, if I cannot charger then I utilize 1/2 the capacity 10 to 12 bars. My concern is having the best practice to achieve the range needed day to day. I do not have a lvl 2 home charger as of yet but I have made the adapter for 220 for the factory cable. This has me getting back to a full charge 10-12 hours daily around 16 from 1/2 battery.
 

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I started with plugging in every day due to range anxiety. After a few months of feeling comfortable with my vehicle and range I wanted to see what happens (with the warnings) when I run the battery down to low. When I plugged it in to charge over the weekend I found that charging my car was more efficient (for my home electricity usage) to do once a week rather than every day. Because of that finding I now charge my car once a week with the hilltop reserve set at 75% I typically get down to 30% by the end of the week.

My 5 day a week charge was 5.5hr each day and now my one day a week charge is 18hr...so a heck of a lot more efficient for my home electric usage!

That is what I am comfortable with but after a few months you will find what works best for you.
 

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There are a lot of opinions, but little data in the Bolt community. There is a lot more data in the Tesla community. I own both. I have a 2019 Bolt as my daily car, and a 2018 Model 3 that my wife drives and that we take on trips. Based on information from the Tesla side (including from Elon) charging time 90% as a standard charge is encouraged. 100% charge is fine provided you do not let it set at that level for extended time. Also, per the information again from the Tesla side (1 million cars of experience) taking the battery very low is ok, again provided you do not leave it there. Get it back over 20%. This is my opinion based on the data I have read from the Tesla data.
Isn't part of that because at 100% a Tesla is actually very close to 100% compared to a Bolt where 100% is actually 96% of total capacity? If I am wrong on this let me know :) Personally I like having full regen, so I normally charge to the hill top reserve level.

Keith
 

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I have been using Electric Propulsion for about a dozen years. Cars, Motorcycles, Bicycles, and Scooters. I employ HyperMiling whenever possible. My 2020 Bolt purchased in January
has 4370 miles with 5.5 mi/kWh average. If charging to 100%, Dash shows just under 400 miles of range in the middle with Just under 500 miles on high side and just over 300 miles on low side.
I plug in whenever I reach home, usually setting the charge to lower than what is needed so that it doesn't " charge " but, is plugged in in case it gets too hot or too cold.
Presently it is sitting at 78% with 286 miles of range showing. I generally try to keep it between 40% and 80% charged. 80% seems to be the conventional wisdom for Lithium batteries in general.
I presently own 3 Zero Motorcycles. From 2006 until a couple years ago, the manual said that as soon as the motorcycle was assembled, it should be kept plugged in when not ridden.
There was no ability to adjust charge rate so the motorcycle was always kept at 100%. Recently, the instructions have changed to unplug at 80%. My oldest present one is a 2013. Still charges to
100% but that goes away VERY quickly. Cell balance at low state of charge is WAY out lowering to under 10 mv ( still bad ) as full charge nears. My 2014 which received a new battery last year
under warranty ( battery was toast when I purchased it ) is around 7 to 8 mv when fully drained shows around 3 mv when approaching full which is where my 2016 still sits today. I have had a
Gen I Volt, a Gen II Volt, and two Focus Electrics along with a 1993 Toyota Paseo with Lead Batteries. With well over 100,000 miles of electric driving, I have Never had an issue with the traction
pack. Both Volts and Both Focuses had the 12 Battery replaced under warranty.
The next argument is Fast charge vs Slow charge. The faster you charge, the more heat is generated in the battery. Heat ( or cold ) is not good. Again, conventional wisdom is to charge as
slowly as feasible for your situation. If you drive 40 miles per day, you can plug in to recoup that 40 miles at 8 amps and have all that you need in the morning. As pointed out by HuskyJohn
above, your home energy use will be better if used less often. The reason for this is that the EVSE uses energy. There are losses converting from AC to DC or DC to AC. Then, there is the
fact that not 100% of the energy produced is used. On board charger is not 100% efficient, so energy is wasted. Level II charge once a week or so, would probably be the most efficient.
Again, if you drive 300 miles a day, 120 volt 8 amp won't work. Level II would be impractical for adding range, so DCFS would be needed. Again, Stopping around 50% would ( should ) be most
efficient with Level II overnight at home.
MOST vehicle owners have a vehicle for a few years. Many EV owners want this to be " the last vehicle I purchase ". At about 10 years in, we are still at the beginning of EV adoption. So, every
year there are " Newer and Better " options. I didn't NEED a new vehicle but was looking at Used Bolts. There was such a great deal on my 2020 that I couldn't pass it up ( SURE ).
As far as high mileage Bolts, I am sure that many are aware of Voltstats.net. There are 10 Bolts with over 100,000 miles on there now with the highest being 142,000 miles. Interestingly, the
owner has nicknamed it Overcharged.
Sorry to have been so verbose and meandering around. Hopefully, this will be helpful to some. As most above have said, ENJOY YOUR BOLT !
If anyone is interested, here is a quick link to HyperMiling. Many videos are available as well. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

 

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So many opinions. What I find interesting is that if you talked to a group of ICE owners about babying their engine the way some are inclined to baby their batteries the ICE owners would look at you like you're cross eyed and crazy. Does anyone worry about their cell phone battery this way? What I do know from my personal experience is every time I haven't plugged in when I've gotten home I've regretted it. My wife and I adopted a simple adage "Pull in and Plug in". At 45,000 miles per year on just our Bolt, its our go to family vehicle. Any trip over the available RT miles on the Bolt and we will likely take our Prius as we hate the inconvenience of charging away from home. Thus the reason to always keep the Bolt charged to 100%. We have 225,000 miles on our Prius with the original Li-ion battery and its still going strong with my wife getting 60+mpg consistently everyday. I really have more important things to worry about than if I should only charge to 83.14159265359% on the Bolt...I would hope GM figured out the min-max charge before they rolled it out to the public and have it set automatically within those parameters......Just my opinion.
 

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There is actually more debate among ICE owners. Debate range from issues of the right engine oil, the right oil filter and the right gasoline to extend the life of the engine. ;)
 

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So many opinions. What I find interesting is that if you talked to a group of ICE owners about babying their engine the way some are inclined to baby their batteries the ICE owners would look at you like you're cross eyed and crazy. Does anyone worry about their cell phone battery this way? What I do know from my personal experience is every time I haven't plugged in when I've gotten home I've regretted it. My wife and I adopted a simple adage "Pull in and Plug in". At 45,000 miles per year on just our Bolt, its our go to family vehicle. Any trip over the available RT miles on the Bolt and we will likely take our Prius as we hate the inconvenience of charging away from home. Thus the reason to always keep the Bolt charged to 100%. We have 225,000 miles on our Prius with the original Li-ion battery and its still going strong with my wife getting 60+mpg consistently everyday. I really have more important things to worry about than if I should only charge to 83.14159265359% on the Bolt...I would hope GM figured out the min-max charge before they rolled it out to the public and have it set automatically within those parameters......Just my opinion.
"Does anyone worry about their cell phone battery this way? "

Yes! I only discharge to about 20%, and take it off the charger at about 90%, if I'm around while it's charging.

I typically get 4-5 years out of a cell-phone battery. I tend to keep a smart phone until apps stop working because it's OS is so "old". I retired my Samsung Note 3 after seven years. It's now a display for my solar PV system controller.
 

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The interesting thing about cellphone batteries is that many people do complain that it only lasts about 2 years, yet do not generally care to know about prolonging it (i.e. keep it charged between around 20-80% level). If it does indeed degrade significantly, either the phone is too out of fashion, the manufacturer has dropped support, or you can simply have the battery replaced for less than 50 bucks. Why change your habits when it won't matter too much, financially or otherwise, when it's time to replace it?

But then you have this expensive EV and its expensive battery using the same basic chemistry as your phone (Li-ion). You fear the battery is going to last a few years at best and to confirm your fears, that Leaf had relatively pronounced degradation. Many newer EVs have much more robust battery management, but do not have sufficient long-term data to allay the fears. So a lot of folks understandably end up getting concerned about the lifetime of the battery.

What's muddying the waters is that each car has different battery packs and different management system, limiting cross-referencing. And by the time a long-term data trend is established, that car is likely out of production. I think we will never have an end to the debate of EV battery degradation.
 

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"Does anyone worry about their cell phone battery this way? "

Yes! I only discharge to about 20%, and take it off the charger at about 90%, if I'm around while it's charging.

I typically get 4-5 years out of a cell-phone battery. I tend to keep a smart phone until apps stop working because it's OS is so "old". I retired my Samsung Note 3 after seven years. It's now a display for my solar PV system controller.
As far as phone and computers go (mine are all Apple) I have a 2011 MacBook Pro with a battery that will still go hours on end when needed, and my wife has a 2010 MacBook Pro that is good for at least 3 hours. Both of these computers a plugged in ALL the time when not in use. I charge my Iphone to 100% every night and the only battery issue I've ever had after years of use is a swelled one way back in my iphone 6. My wife, on they the other hand, lets here iphone go to nearly zero on a regular basis, and her phone which is nearly 2 years newer than mine already shows significant deg.

This all aligns pretty will with what I've heard from what I consider reputable sources. Charging to 100% may cause a bit of deg, but discharging below 40% on regular basis is a battery killer. I suspect all current LiIon's are similar in this regard - Do whatever it takes to not go below 40% on a daily basis. Otherwise, keeping below 100% is probably a good idea.
 

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Given your relatively long drives I would just charge to 100% whenever you are heading out. That way you don't have any worry about AC or heat or other energy use.
 

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I recently purchased a 2020 bolt and drive 160 miles round trip 3 days a week and 188 the other 2 days. Should I 100% charger every night? Or would 80% be good enough. I live in central Missouri I'm anticipating 100% in the winter months for sure to complete my trips. Any thoughts or opinions welcome.
Toyota originally set battery usage for the Prius between 20-80% to avoid damage. That practice has become standard for long battery life over hundreds of thousands of miles, but the difference is only a few percent. We charge our '19 Bolts fully when we do charge. In nice weather, we get readings of almost 260 miles on the meter using 240V straight from the garage outlet and a 25' 14/3 extension cord to the factory cable, which is also 14/3. I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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Unless you absolutely need the range, I wouldn't charge daily past 95% battery in the 2020 Chevy Bolt EV. In the last three and a half years,I've lost more than that 5% capacity in my 2017 Bolt EV, and I believe the primary factor was cycling through more than 95% of the total battery capacity on a regular basis.
 
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