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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading all of the horror stories about dead 12V AGM battery: I figured it's time to replace the 12V battery in my 2017 Bolt which is now 4-years from new vehicle delivery date.

I'm not very good with a wrench. But I'd like to do this as a DIY job. However, presently the sum total of my knowledge is: the correct sequence in removing and reattaching the clamps on the positive and negative terminals. :rolleyes:

I don't have a trickle charger in the event it's necessary to keep the 12V system charged during the 12V battery swap. In order to keep say, the memory for the entertainment system or other things ? I guess I should keep the driver's door open in case something goes wrong ?

Is this job too risky given my level of knowledge ? Should I just pay thru the nose at the dealership and avoid a potential catastrophe ?
 

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I use a trickle charge for all my cars roughly every 6 months. In each, i disconnect the 12v for the night.

When I did this the first night with the Bolt, I was pleasantly surprised how many settings had been stored.

I think you should try it; Wear gloves. Don't get the wrench between the post and the clamp. After the positive clamp is off, put another glove over it and tape it at the wrist.

What I like about trickle charging is, I can watch how long it takes to charge. This gives me an early warning to any electrical misbehaviors. You wouldn't believe how many "electrical problems" are just a dying or poorly charged 12v.

Doing your own electrical work is empowering. Remember that AC goes "zap" and DC goes "bang". Current follows the path of least resistance; don't be that path.
 

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IMO, you should replace it only after properly charging it and testing it.
If it fails, then you should replace it. If not, keep using it. YMMV!

I understand why you're asking this question, but, you should properly maintain
any 12 volt battery by charging it with a proper charger every 6 months.

I've been using these chargers for the last 10 plus years and think every battery
owner should have one to properly service their 12 volt batteries!


My 2017 with 56K miles still has the original battery. It has no problems!
 

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I don’t own an EV (yet), but I’ve been doing all my own maintenance on multiple vehicles for 30+ years now (including replacing batteries, of course), and I’ve never used a backup power source when swapping out a battery. The last two times were within the last 3 years on both my 2002 Impala and 2011 Equinox. Didn’t lose any radio presets either time! Must be some big capacitor in there holding charge for a good while?

I also have a Craftsman trickle-charger/jump-starter that I’ve used on occasion to keep a battery “alive” while I had some engine project going on, but I’ve never thought to just attach it to a battery that’s otherwise “good”. I carry a lithium battery jumper and just wait for the battery to show first sign of failure, then replace the battery. The Impala battery lasted 7+ years. The Equinox battery 5+ years. I think that’s acceptable...
 

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When I replaced my MSD I opened the hood, closed all doors, waited 5 min (for electronics to fully power down), and then disconnected the negative cable. When I reconnected the battery later, all my settings were still intact except the charge limit which had reset to 100%. If you decide to do it, negative first, then positive when removing the old one then positive first, then negative when you put the new one in.

Mike
 

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Yes. Do it yourself. Verify the exact process beforehand if you wish to avoid warning lamps, false DTCs, etc.
 

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I don’t own an EV (yet), but I’ve been doing all my own maintenance on multiple vehicles for 30+ years now (including replacing batteries, of course), and I’ve never used a backup power source when swapping out a battery. The last two times were within the last 3 years on both my 2002 Impala and 2011 Equinox. Didn’t lose any radio presets either time! Must be some big capacitor in there holding charge for a good while?

I also have a Craftsman trickle-charger/jump-starter that I’ve used on occasion to keep a battery “alive” while I had some engine project going on, but I’ve never thought to just attach it to a battery that’s otherwise “good”. I carry a lithium battery jumper and just wait for the battery to show first sign of failure, then replace the battery. The Impala battery lasted 7+ years. The Equinox battery 5+ years. I think that’s acceptable...

Yep! Everyone has their own methods. I prefer to keep my batteries serviced with a charger.
It's a quick and easy way to keep them in good shape. Vehicles are not battery conditioners
or chargers. They're only designed to replenish voltage used by the cars loads.

I have yet to see one @ 100% SOC when checking mine. Cell balancing and desulfation are
required. The lead sulfate crystals are broken down during the charging cycle.
Some crystals can remain if a battery is left partially discharged.
The crystals of lead sulfate can harden and reduce the capacity of the battery.
This is why desulfation is necessary, IMO! Mainly battery health and longevity!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don’t own an EV (yet), but I’ve been doing all my own maintenance on multiple vehicles for 30+ years now (including replacing batteries, of course), and I’ve never used a backup power source when swapping out a battery. The last two times were within the last 3 years on both my 2002 Impala and 2011 Equinox. Didn’t lose any radio presets either time! Must be some big capacitor in there holding charge for a good while?

I also have a Craftsman trickle-charger/jump-starter that I’ve used on occasion to keep a battery “alive” while I had some engine project going on, but I’ve never thought to just attach it to a battery that’s otherwise “good”. I carry a lithium battery jumper and just wait for the battery to show first sign of failure, then replace the battery. The Impala battery lasted 7+ years. The Equinox battery 5+ years. I think that’s acceptable...
Yes, I replaced the battery on my wife's Buick Encore without using a backup power source and didn't lose any memory items.
IMO, you should replace it only after properly charging it and testing it.
If it fails, then you should replace it. If not, keep using it. YMMV!

I understand why you're asking this question, but, you should properly maintain
any 12 volt battery by charging it with a proper charger every 6 months.

I've been using these chargers for the last 10 plus years and think every battery
owner should have one to properly service their 12 volt batteries!


My 2017 with 56K miles still has the original battery. It has no problems!
All I've got is a 20 year old charger that I used to keep 12V lead acid boat batteries charged over the winter! This thread is telling me perhaps I should prioritize going to school on the Bolt style AGM and get some equipment ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I use a trickle charge for all my cars roughly every 6 months. In each, i disconnect the 12v for the night.

When I did this the first night with the Bolt, I was pleasantly surprised how many settings had been stored.

I think you should try it; Wear gloves. Don't get the wrench between the post and the clamp. After the positive clamp is off, put another glove over it and tape it at the wrist.

What I like about trickle charging is, I can watch how long it takes to charge. This gives me an early warning to any electrical misbehaviors. You wouldn't believe how many "electrical problems" are just a dying or poorly charged 12v.

Doing your own electrical work is empowering. Remember that AC goes "zap" and DC goes "bang". Current follows the path of least resistance; don't be that path.
Do you trickle the 12V system only. Or, charge the 12V battery itself as well?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When I replaced my MSD I opened the hood, closed all doors, waited 5 min (for electronics to fully power down), and then disconnected the negative cable. When I reconnected the battery later, all my settings were still intact except the charge limit which had reset to 100%. If you decide to do it, negative first, then positive when removing the old one then positive first, then negative when you put the new one in.

Mike
Sorry I'm not conversant as to what MSD is ?
 

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That 50 dollar charger is all you need. I have 3 of them and use them all the time.
My cars, trucks, motorcycles, UTV, excavator, and deep cycle batteries all get charged on a regular basis!
 

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A battery can last 8 years if it's not abused. I've never heard of replacing a battery before it having signs of failure.

Any shop can do a load test to determine the health of your battery.

Better strategy is to invest $30 in a jump pack. You'll probably sell the vehicle before you need a new battery.

Something like

Amazon.com: BIUBLE Car Battery Starter, 1000A Peak 12800mAh 12V Car Auto Jump Starter Power Pack with USB Quick Charge 3.0 (Up to 7L Gas or 5.5L Diesel Engine): Automotive
Yes, batteries can last longer, but in an ICE vehicle 4 years is the average - some more, some less. ICE batteries get more stress when cranking the ICE versus running a few computers in the Bolt. Replacing a battery before signs of failure is done regularly via testing - I replaced my battery in my ICE pickup at 3 years, based on testing, in order to not get stranded in my very rural area.

However, the jump pack is a good idea, as it can be used for other purposes.
 

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Yes, batteries can last longer, but in an ICE vehicle 4 years is the average - some more, some less. ICE batteries get more stress when cranking the ICE versus running a few computers in the Bolt. Replacing a battery before signs of failure is done regularly via testing - I replaced my battery in my ICE pickup at 3 years, based on testing, in order to not get stranded in my very rural area.

However, the jump pack is a good idea, as it can be used for other purposes.
I've been able to get an average of my ICE batteries close to 6 years by servicing them every 6 months with the battery charger I linked to. The wife's was 6.7 years before it crapped out! My diesel has two and they both started to show weak after 5.5 years. I replaced them and finished them off on a solar inverter setup that lasted another year. Someone just turned in 2 deep cycle batteries that are a year old.

I used that charger to recharge them and tested both to make sure they were still good.
They passed with flying colors and only cost me 10 bucks o_O They're my new solar storage batteries.
 

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Sorry I'm not conversant as to what MSD is ?
Manual service disconnect: the main fuse under the rear seat. I replaced mine about a month before the recall came out because I heard about them being defective here. At the time I replaced it, it was a known problem but GM had gone about a year without a recall so I did it preemtively. Cost $98 but saved me a day at the dealer.

Mike
 

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Manual service disconnect: the main fuse under the rear seat. I replaced mine about a month before the recall came out because I heard about them being defective here. At the time I replaced it, it was a known problem but GM had gone about a year without a recall so I did it preemtively. Cost $98 but saved me a day at the dealer.

Mike
Where on here did you hear that ? Got a link to the info. ?
 

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..... ICE batteries get more stress when cranking the ICE versus running a few computers in the Bolt.....
Actually the 12V battery boots up the car and is only giving power for < 5 seconds before the HV battery is powering the DC to DC converter which then supplies the 12-14 VDC bus. The 12V battery is then just sitting on that bus not doing anything.
 

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Actually the 12V battery boots up the car and is only giving power for < 5 seconds before the HV battery is powering the DC to DC converter which then supplies the 12-14 VDC bus. The 12V battery is then just sitting on that bus not doing anything.
The battery handles the 12 volt system loads. The DC/DC is charging the battery!
It also supplies the KAM for the control modules when the car is off.
 

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The battery handles the 12 volt system loads. The DC/DC is charging the battery!
It also supplies the KAM for the control modules when the car is off.
There is a 14 VDC bus when the car is powered on. All 12/14 VDC systems and accessories in the car are all powered by the DC/DC converter which get it's high input from the HV pack. The 12V battery just sits on that bus when the car is powered on.
Same thing as you are saying, but it's all the same bus.

What's KAM?

Yes, powered off the battery has duties and it's charge is being used up.
But it has the capacity to handle those duties for weeks and maybe months....
 
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Where on here did you hear that ? Got a link to the info. ?
A bunch of threads here about it (before the recall happened). Hard to pick just one but I'll pick this one:


Mike
 
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