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A battery can last 8 years if it's not abused. I've never heard of replacing a battery before it having signs of failure.

Any shop can do a load test to determine the health of your battery.

Better strategy is to invest $30 in a jump pack. You'll probably sell the vehicle before you need a new battery.

Something like

Amazon.com: BIUBLE Car Battery Starter, 1000A Peak 12800mAh 12V Car Auto Jump Starter Power Pack with USB Quick Charge 3.0 (Up to 7L Gas or 5.5L Diesel Engine): Automotive
Or longer. 2002-2013! :)
 
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There is a 14 VDC bus when the car is powered on. All 12/14 VDC systems and accessories in the car are all powered by the DC/DC converter which get it's high input from the HV pack. The 12V battery just sits on that bus when the car is powered on.
Same thing as you are saying, but it's all the same bus.

What's KAM?

Yes, powered off the battery has duties and it's charge is being used up.
But it has the capacity to handle those duties for weeks and maybe months....
That's the 14 volt buss. KAM = Keep Alive Memory! The battery carries the 12 volt loads.
Headlamps, wipers, radio, power windows, horn, ETC.
 

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Replacing a battery before signs of failure is done regularly via testing - I replaced my battery in my ICE pickup at 3 years, based on testing, in order to not get stranded in my very rural area.
Seems we’re in agreement since we both said batteries should be tested and replaced before failure.

Anecdotally, batteries in my ICE vehicles generally last 8 years, and I do nothing special to preserve them other than not run them down, and occasionally check electrolyte levels.
 

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Seems we’re in agreement since we both said batteries should be tested and replaced before failure.

Anecdotally, batteries in my ICE vehicles generally last 8 years, and I do nothing special to preserve them other than not run them down, and occasionally check electrolyte levels.
For my 2002-2013 battery, I used R/O water instead of Brawndo... you know, it's like the water inn my toilet. Anecdotally, I do not see plants growing out of my toilet, so it must not be good for plants! :)
 

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Go get a battery load tester first.
Use to test your 12V battery every 6 months. I have owned lots of cars, riding lawn mowers, and boats. The load tester will tell you if the battery needs to be replaced. (Same thing the guys at the auto parts store use).
Then get a jump pack and keep in the trunk. (I have one with a jump pack and a compressor). When someone needs a jump for their ICE car, i never hook jumper cables to my car from them. I just take the "brick" over and help them jump. I never trust a bad cars electronics with my sensitive electronics. I would also carry the "brick" on my boat to jump start the guys who ran their starting batteries down and couldn't parallel house and starting.
 

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That's the 14 volt buss. KAM = Keep Alive Memory! The battery carries the 12 volt loads.
Headlamps, wipers, radio, power windows, horn, ETC.
But the battery is a ~12.3V source. The DC/DC converter supplies the 14V power when the car is powered up.
I maintain the battery is just along for the ride once it boots up the car.
Buss is a brand name. Bus is a means of distributing power.

And I don't trust Load Testers. I had one test a battery as good for its short test, but the battery <10% of its rated capacity.
Capacity Tests are the standard for aviation batteries.
It tests if the battery can do what the Ahr label says it can do.
I realize Cap Testers are not used in the automotive world. They take time to do.
So,,, never mind.
 
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But the battery is a ~12.3V source. The DC/DC converter supplies the 14V power when the car is powered up.
I maintain the battery is just along for the ride once it boots up the car.
Buss is a brand name. Bus is a means of distributing power.

And I don't trust Load Testers. I had one test a battery as good for its short test, but the battery <10% of its rated capacity.
Capacity Tests are the standard for aviation batteries.
It tests if the battery can do what the Ahr label says it can do.
I realize Cap Testers are not used in the automotive world. They take time to do.
So,,, never mind.
Actually, the battery can be as much as a 12.8 volt source when properly charged. The DC/DC recharges it and brings it's voltage up to the DC/DC's output level based on the BCM settings in the configuration output settings.

The buss was a typo!

The bus isn't there to handle the load. That's the batteries job. Not a problem, I was just wondering where the testing times were coming from (y)
 

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I've been using Deltran's Battery Tender on all my vehicles for 20 years. It does not de-sulfate the battery, but a fully charged battery does not form sulfate crystals anyway. The Deltran charger for autos are usually 2amp, and for motorcycles is usually .5 or .75 amps. All Deltran BT's will initially check the voltage level, then it runs the battery voltage up to ~14.2 or so if it's lower than that, then monitors voltage until it hits 13v or so and charges back up.

I should have started using these chargers many years ago, I used to replace my Harley batteries every year or two since I did not ride in winter, it gets too cold here to ride in winter, and there is lots of ice and snow. When I started using the Deltran BT my batteries lasted 6-7 years, and I usually replaced them prior to any problems since I've seen many buddies have battery problems out on the road. And that is no fun!

The Deltran is way cheaper than the batteries it saves, and I've yet to see one cook a battery. A 'trickle charger' has no business being used on a constant basis, it WILL cook the battery unless you pay close attention to the state of charge for the battery you are charging. I know that from experience with a quad runner. I connected a trickle charger to it, and forgot about it over the winter. When I tried to start the quad runner the solenoid clicked - then nothing. No indicator lights, nothing. Use trickle chargers with caution.
 

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....The bus isn't there to handle the load. That's the batteries job. ...
The bus that is powered by the ?100-120? Amp rated DC/DC converter? That bus isn't there to handle the load?
Sorry, we beat this horse enough... ;)
 

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Do you trickle the 12V system only. Or, charge the 12V battery itself as well?
I leave the battery in the car (for simplicity), but disconnected from the system. I had found on a previous car that the circuitry confused the trickle charger.
 

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I leave the battery in the car (for simplicity), but disconnected from the system.
I leave it connected when using the BatteryMINDer® Model 2012-AGM.
No problem found.
It gives you HOPE, that your 12V battery will live a long life.
 

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Reading all of the horror stories about dead 12V AGM battery: I figured it's time to replace the 12V battery in my 2017 Bolt which is now 4-years from new vehicle delivery date.

I'm not very good with a wrench. But I'd like to do this as a DIY job. However, presently the sum total of my knowledge is: the correct sequence in removing and reattaching the clamps on the positive and negative terminals. :rolleyes:

I don't have a trickle charger in the event it's necessary to keep the 12V system charged during the 12V battery swap. In order to keep say, the memory for the entertainment system or other things ? I guess I should keep the driver's door open in case something goes wrong ?

Is this job too risky given my level of knowledge ? Should I just pay thru the nose at the dealership and avoid a potential catastrophe ?
I have the same age battery and have no plans to change it. Why would I do that?
 

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I leave it connected when using the BatteryMINDer® Model 2012-AGM.
No problem found.
It gives you HOPE, that your 12V battery will live a long life.
2008 Chevy Cobalt ICE vehicle with original Delco battery when I sold it last year. Parked outside in Colorado for the 12 years I owned it and driven to work everyday, 136 thousand miles and 12 years never had any battery issues and never did any kind of maintenance. Pretty amazing I thought. Now a Cobalt’s battery is located in the trunk so maybe that environment had something to do with it but who knows. Don’t R&R a good battery in my opinion. My 2011 Silverado still has the original battery 10 years later too and it’s working well.
 

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I have the same age battery and have no plans to change it. Why would I do that?
I change the 12V battery on my camperized Plymouth Voyager every 5 years (actually, both batteries, the starter battery and the house battery). I do this because from experience I know I've gotten most its useful life by that time anyway and I don't want to get stuck somewhere.

I'm load testing my Bolt battery on a regular basis. The car is 3-1/2 years old now and I've seen at least a couple of posts by folks to had to replace it at around the 4 year mark. It would be nice to get 5 years out of the battery, but if it gets too weak in one of my tests then out it goes.
 

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I used to have a routine of listening to a little music in my car at night while reading just before I slept in it. Months of doing that weakened my battery to the point that my routine changed to include pushing my car across the abandoned parking lot and jumping in to bump start it in the morning as I drove to the gym. It was nearly a 2 year routine. Very efficient, and I saved way more than enough for a down payment on my first house with my modest paycheck living frugally.
 

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I change the 12V battery on my camperized Plymouth Voyager every 5 years (actually, both batteries, the starter battery and the house battery). I do this because from experience I know I've gotten most its useful life by that time anyway and I don't want to get stuck somewhere.

I'm load testing my Bolt battery on a regular basis. The car is 3-1/2 years old now and I've seen at least a couple of posts by folks to had to replace it at around the 4 year mark. It would be nice to get 5 years out of the battery, but if it gets too weak in one of my tests then out it goes.
What part of Canada are you inn? If in Vancouver, the climate is very good to battery life (same with Seattle and probably Portland).
 

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What part of Canada are you inn? If in Vancouver, the climate is very good to battery life (same with Seattle and probably Portland).
Yep, Vancouver. But the 12V battery in my Bolt doesn't hold up under the load of my tester like it used to...
 
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