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Gang,,,

I've noticed several times that the 'green' ring around the speedometer will change to yellow.

why?

And while everyone is talking battery range now that there is a recall, I set the car to hilltop reserve and instead of seeing a 20% reduction in range, I got a lot less.

Figure on 238 miles, 80% is 190. Just did a charge and the car reports 174 miles.

Two days ago, I did a full 100% charge and saw 240 miles.

Numbers don't quite add up.

It is colder out, in the low 40s, but still that'a heck of a whack on mileage even with the hilltop reserve turned on
 

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I've seen the ring turn yellow if I go fast... around 110 km/h (70 mph) or more. It would be an indicator telling you that the driving speed is not efficiency-friendly.

The most recent driving conditions can heavily affect the estimated range. I've seen the full-charge (100%) range drop from something like 520 km to 420 km on a single long-distance trip. If you really want to see if the numbers don't add up or not, disable the hilltop reserve and charge to 100%, then see the range.
 

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Gang,,,

I've noticed several times that the 'green' ring around the speedometer will change to yellow.

why?

And while everyone is talking battery range now that there is a recall, I set the car to hilltop reserve and instead of seeing a 20% reduction in range, I got a lot less.

Figure on 238 miles, 80% is 190. Just did a charge and the car reports 174 miles.

Two days ago, I did a full 100% charge and saw 240 miles.

Numbers don't quite add up.

It is colder out, in the low 40s, but still that'a heck of a whack on mileage even with the hilltop reserve turned on
The yellow ring is kind of a trend indicator. The more efficient you are driving (ie downhill), it turns green. The less efficient it turns yellow. I think it is relative to the intervals in the energy details screen.

The range figures are predictions, we fondly refer to it as the Guess-O-Meter (GOM). It is not really an indication of charge level, but rather an average of the 3.9x EPA efficiency and the past 2-4 cycles of driving efficiency. As the weather turns colder, HVAC use and lower energy potential of colder temps tends to lower driving efficiency, so that may be what you are seeing on the GOM. The GOM trends along with seasonal temps, reaching higher levels in spring and fall, summer of your not using AC too much, and drops in winter months.

Hilltop Reserve (HTR) limits charging to ~88%.
 

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The ring is an efficiency indicator. EVs are not efficient at highway speeds which is why around 65 mph (around 104 kph) the ring turns yellow. And as for the range indicating a Loy less than usually. Try two things, check what it says the max is and also try to avoid highways for a few miles to allow the computer to give a higher efficiency rating. The car is rated at 3.9 miles per killowatt and if your driving is below that then the car will give you a range estimate under 238 miles. Also keep in mind that these numbers are estimates meaning it is very easy for something to happen that the car didn't take into consideration that could have a large impact on your range.
 

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I've noticed several times that the 'green' ring around the speedometer will change to yellow. Why?

I set the car to hilltop reserve and instead of seeing a 20% reduction in range, I got a lot less.
It is to tell you that you are using power more aggressively....not driving like an old fart.

Hilltop charge is 87%-90%% typically. So you are only losing 10%-13% of capacity. The range meter reading is only somewhat determined by charge level. It is also affected by your recent driving style, battery temperature, and HVAC settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The yellow ring is kind of a trend indicator. The more efficient you are driving (ie downhill), it turns green. The less efficient it turns yellow. I think it is relative to the intervals in the energy details screen.

The range figures are predictions, we fondly refer to it as the Guess-O-Meter (GOM). It is not really an indication of charge level, but rather an average of the 3.9x EPA efficiency and the past 2-4 cycles of driving efficiency. As the weather turns colder, HVAC use and lower energy potential of colder temps tends to lower driving efficiency, so that may be what you are seeing on the GOM. The GOM trends along with seasonal temps, reaching higher levels in spring and fall, summer of your not using AC too much, and drops in winter months.

Hilltop Reserve (HTR) limits charging to ~88%.

Okay on the ring. I figured it had to be something about power. I was on the freeway home, and doing 65 up a long gradual incline when I noticed the ring color changed from green to yellow.

One of the reason why my wife and I purchased a Bolt was because the Chevy Spark EV we had dropped range like a rock in the winter. With 14k miles on it, in January, we saw 50ish miles range. In the summer it would peak to 80ish. Fifty miles in the winter is basically useless, and that was without running the heater much to my wife's dismay. Turn on some heat, and we couldn't make the trip from home to shopping mall and back.

I know, and fully understand the current issue about fires and exploding battery packs with the Bolt and the resulting recall. What I didn't expect was such a dramatic drop in range as presented by the GOM when I turned on hill top reserve.

Could it be a combination of cooler weather as well? Most likely. I'll need to put some miles on it and see what happens to the GoM
 

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the Chevy Spark EV we had dropped range like a rock in the winter... in January, we saw 50ish miles range. In the summer it would peak to 80ish....Could it be a combination of cooler weather as well?
Yes. Your Spark lost 37.5% of its range in January. So will the Bolt. And now you have reduced that by 10% in hilltop.

0.625 x 238 = 148.8 x 0.9 = 133.9

177 miles is just about right now. Expect 134 miles in January.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes. Your Spark lost 37.5% of its range in January. So will the Bolt. And now you have reduced that by 10% in hilltop.

0.625 x 238 = 148.8 x 0.9 = 133.9

177 miles is just about right now. Expect 134 miles in January.
****, when you put it in numbers, that kinda sucks!

That means, I'd have to sit in a cold car and even then, I don't have the range to drive from my house to cleveland ohio ( 65 miles one way) and back on a cold january day.

I've always wanted an EV, that's why I purchased the Spark, wanted to dip my toes in the EV world. And did like it enough to drop the $$$ on the Bolt.

That's going to be a hard sell for EVs in the northern part of the country if the cold weather knocks the snot out of them that much.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It is to tell you that you are using power more aggressively....not driving like an old fart.

Hilltop charge is 87%-90%% typically. So you are only losing 10%-13% of capacity. The range meter reading is only somewhat determined by charge level. It is also affected by your recent driving style, battery temperature, and HVAC settings.
I am an old fart!
 

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That means, I'd have to sit in a cold car and even then, I don't have the range to drive from my house to cleveland ohio ( 65 miles one way) and back on a cold january day.
Naw. Turn the temp knob to HI/90F, turn on the seat heat, and do a cabin precondition while it is still plugged in. Do a second one, if you have time. Everything will be toasty warm by the time you leave, and it will most likely have heated the battery as well. Turn off the HVAC, set the fan to 2, and just have air blowing on the windshield. Keep you seat heat on 3. If the windshield fogs up, hit the Max button. It will blow hot air at high fan on the windshield. After 30 seconds to a minute it will be clear. Hit the Max button again, and it will go back to your eco settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When I purchased this 2017, I screwed myself.
NO heated seats or heated steering wheel.
For goodness sakes, the Spark EV had heated seats... As a matter of fact, this one I have is about as basic as you can get a Bolt. We should have looked around, and we did a bit but when the ink dried, we got what we have—pretty much stripped base Bolt.

Grrrrr...what was I thinking?
 

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When I purchased this 2017, I screwed myself.
NO heated seats or heated steering wheel.
For goodness sakes, the Spark EV had heated seats... As a matter of fact, this one I have is about as basic as you can get a Bolt. We should have looked around, and we did a bit but when the ink dried, we got what we have—pretty much stripped base Bolt.

Grrrrr...what was I thinking?
You can get electric lap blankets that plug into the cigarette lighter port.

 

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GJETSON has it right. The Bolt can make a 130 mile drive in cold weather. I've done exactly that for the last two years at freeway speeds for 90% of the drive. In the winter, I make sure to precondition while it's plugged in, then run the heat sparingly and mainly to defrost as GJETSON said. I also tend to drive slower (65-70 mph) which has the greatest impact on range other than running the heater. I've never done this but you could also put a blanket/heated blanket by your feet which will be the first to get cold.

Now, having said all that, at 90% or hilltop (because of the recall) you might not have the range to make 130 miles even if you do everything recommended. That's why I ended up calling and getting a loaner - my Bolt payment only makes sense if it's saving me gas and my ICE is 3 rows and only gets 21mpg.
 

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GJETSON has it right. The Bolt can make a 130 mile drive in cold weather. I've done exactly that for the last two years at freeway speeds for 90% of the drive. In the winter, I make sure to precondition while it's plugged in, then run the heat sparingly and mainly to defrost as GJETSON said. I also tend to drive slower (65-70 mph) which has the greatest impact on range other than running the heater. I've never done this but you could also put a blanket/heated blanket by your feet which will be the first to get cold.

Now, having said all that, at 90% or hilltop (because of the recall) you might not have the range to make 130 miles even if you do everything recommended. That's why I ended up calling and getting a loaner - my Bolt payment only makes sense if it's saving me gas and my ICE is 3 rows and only gets 21mpg.
I enjoy driving an EV. But let's face it boys and girls, if you tell your neighbor that you got to plug in a 12V electric heat blanket, drive slower than traffic (you'd get run over driving 60 on I71 north to Cleveland) and then, depending on the wind, you aren't going to make it to Cleveland and back on a cold January day. I bet he's not going to run to the Chevy dealer and get himself a new 2020 Bolt anytime soon. COVID-19 aside, if my wife and I want to go watch a Browns game, I'll need to drive my ICE car, because the Bolt won't make it.

Think about that. While I didn't buy my Bolt new, at $36000, you can't drive it over 130 miles in the winter (okay perhaps a bit more after the battery issue is resolved) But still?

It's not that I go to Cleveland every other day, it's my standard for range. While Ohio has plenty of level 2 chargers, we seriously lack high speed DC charging. There is one, count'em one in my county. And none along I77, I71 north or south bound. There are a few located closer into the Cleveland, but you have to get off the expressway and go find them. What PITA!
 

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It is. And yet people in cold climate still buy them. They know the limitations alright. But they still do. You bought one, twice, did you not?

Anyway, one option is to install a diesel heater. It is situated under the hood and taps into the car's climate control system. Members in this forum have it done for $1k or so. Do some search and you will find their posts. Together you find nay sayers too, who critized the idea as going backwards. But I think it is brilliant idea. It is the first thing I will do if I move to, or travel enough into, cold climate areas.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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It is. And yet people in cold climate still buy them. They know the limitations alright. But they still do. You bought one, twice, did you not?

Anyway, one option is to install a diesel heater. It is situated under the hood and taps into the car's climate control system. Members in this forum have it done for $1k or so. Do some search and you will find their posts. Together you find nay sayers too, who critized the idea as going backwards. But I think it is brilliant idea. It is the first thing I will do if I move to, or travel enough into, cold climate areas.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
I'm an early adopter, don't know if that's the right phrase or not.

I'm also one of those long-haired pot smokin' hippy type tree huggin' green freaks. Although a lot older now.

My wife and I live in a solar powered house, so the EV was an easy fit—and still is. At home, We change photons to electrons that make the wheel's go 'round.
 

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I'm an early adopter, don't know if that's the right phrase or not.

I'm also one of those long-haired pot smokin' hippy type tree huggin' green freaks. Although a lot older now.

My wife and I live in a solar powered house, so the EV was an easy fit—and still is. At home, We change photons to electrons that make the wheel's go 'round.
Then you are probably among the nay sayers. Nothing wrong.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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The yellow ring is kind of a trend indicator. The more efficient you are driving (ie downhill), it turns green. The less efficient it turns yellow.
Yep - it fades toward yellow when you're going very fast, when you're accelerating very hard, or when you're braking very hard. In other words, in all the situations where you're using (or wasting) more energy than usual.
 

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I enjoy driving an EV. But let's face it boys and girls, if you tell your neighbor that you got to plug in a 12V electric heat blanket, drive slower than traffic (you'd get run over driving 60 on I71 north to Cleveland) and then, depending on the wind, you aren't going to make it to Cleveland and back on a cold January day. I bet he's not going to run to the Chevy dealer and get himself a new 2020 Bolt anytime soon.
Don't forget that a 2020 adds 20 miles. Mainly, though, I don't know many people that need to drive 130 miles at 70+ mph regularly, let alone in the winter.

That said, in colder climates, I really don't see the Bolt being practical for single-car households but I'm also a boy scout type that wants 20-30 miles leftover and switches to awd for snow.
 
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