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I need to vent my frustration here after dealing with an installation of a Nest E Thermostat. I might have received bad devices, but I think that these are more trouble than what they are worth. I am returning the other Nest thermostat and I am sticking with my old reliable programmable thermostats. I have a dual zone house, so for this setup you need a common wire. By the way, I would never ever set up a Nest thermostat without a common wire. To charge itself and draw power to run the unit, it needs to steal power to operate. This is not a good thing for your HVAC unit and could cause some issues down the line.

After connecting the common wire to the unit, which was already sort of installed with my unit, I still had a big issue. I tested the voltage from the C wire and it was right where it needed to be. However, there has a humming from the unit and I now know why some people get higher temperature readings from the Nest. To operate it is drawing power, and from the buzzing not in a good way, and it is heating up the temperature sensor. I had one unit that wouldn't turn on and the second unit probably had a defective base unit. I am done with the Nest E Thermostat and will probably just program it the old school way...
 

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After reading reviews and looking at the Nest units, I went with Ecobee and have been very happy. These smart thermostats will save a bunch of money over "standard" units, but only a little compared to a good programmable unit. The big advantage I've found is in comfort. We have one of the sensors in out bedroom, and at night this is the only one it looks at so the furnace/AC operation is based on the temp in the bedroom and not in the downstairs hallway where the main thermostat is located. I also like the ease of vacation programming, and the "away" function that automatically reduces heat/AC unit when the house is unoccupied. The Ecobee has to "see" that you are home to resume your program, where the Nest can sense when your cell phone is getting close to home and start "preconditioning". I prefer the latter.

As a note, many (most?) programmable thermostats would at least like to draw power from the 24V "C" wire (some can use batteries instead). That's what it is there for and in no way will harm your furnace. It is not "stealing" power from your furnace.
 

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I need to vent my frustration here after dealing with an installation of a Nest E Thermostat. I might have received bad devices, but I think that these are more trouble than what they are worth. I am returning the other Nest thermostat and I am sticking with my old reliable programmable thermostats. I have a dual zone house, so for this setup you need a common wire. By the way, I would never ever set up a Nest thermostat without a common wire. To charge itself and draw power to run the unit, it needs to steal power to operate. This is not a good thing for your HVAC unit and could cause some issues down the line.

After connecting the common wire to the unit, which was already sort of installed with my unit, I still had a big issue. I tested the voltage from the C wire and it was right where it needed to be. However, there has a humming from the unit and I now know why some people get higher temperature readings from the Nest. To operate it is drawing power, and from the buzzing not in a good way, and it is heating up the temperature sensor. I had one unit that wouldn't turn on and the second unit probably had a defective base unit. I am done with the Nest E Thermostat and will probably just program it the old school way...
I own a Gen 1 Nest thermostat and I've had 0 issues. Isn't the "E" the cheaper version?
 

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As a note, many (most?) programmable thermostats would at least like to draw power from the 24V "C" wire (some can use batteries instead). That's what it is there for and in no way will harm your furnace. It is not "stealing" power from your furnace.
If you use the C wire I agree. The Nest is supposed to work without the C wire though, which if you hook up in that way I wouldn't trust it. You can read lots of complaints about furnace cycling due to the Nest being able to work without the C wire.

I might try another product besides the Nest. Yes, I bought the cheaper Nest E. They are still $169 and you can tell it is an inferior product. I am thinking that the base plate was just bad in the unit I installed and it was having power issues. However, two defective Nest E's in a row doesn't give me much confidence in the product.
 

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I went from a Nest to ecobee 3 a year ago. The ecobee has satellite sensors which you can place strategically around the home. I can customize how I want the thermostat to regulate the house temps. Example, when I’m awake I regulate the house temp based on the average temp of the main thermostat and the satellite sensors. When I go to bed, I regulate the temp based on the master bedroom sensor only to have maximum comfort while sleeping.
My current furnace is a single stage high efficiency model; I think ecobee doesn’t work for multi stage or modulating furnaces though.
 
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