Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
2017 Bolt
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I experienced something unusual and like to know if anyone else is experiencing the same thing.
Background: I had always used the Hilltop Reserve (HTR) when charging my 2017 Bolt and got 190 miles out of each charge every time. I had also always got 4.1 miles driving out of each kWh.
What's happening: I took the car to the dealership yesterday afternoon for a software adjustment because of the battery recall. I plugged it in last night to charge. This morning I unplugged (charging not complete) and got 207 miles (the middle number). That's 17 miles more than charging and using HTR. I thought the mechanic turned off my HTR feature so I tried to reset it but couldn't find the HTR feature anywhere. I concluded they took it out.
I then drove to my Mom's house 19 miles away. I expected to see less than 207 miles remaining after arriving but it showed 209 miles when I exited the freeway in her town. It finally showed 210 miles when I got to her house and my usage went up to 4.8 miles per kWh. No way! I gained energy by driving? For the return trip, the screen did show some consumption and the remaining miles were 194 when I got home. That means I used energy for only 13 miles to go somewhere 19 miles from my house and back? Impossible. The software adjustment did something bad to my Bolt.
I didn't turn on AC or heater for the trip.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

What you saw may be normal, or it may be the system is recalibrating a bit.

HTR was removed with the update, some say it is replaced with 90 or 95%, but either way, HTR is 87-88%.

Adding range comes from better efficiency and regen, so not unusual. My commute is downhill to the office, 65 miles. The first 30 miles I often add between 20-30 miles of range due to regen and super efficient 45 MPH driving. I have gone the first 30 miles with 15 mi/kWh efficiency and seen 50 miles added in absolute ideal conditions.
 

·
Registered
2017 Bolt
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to the forum.

What you saw may be normal, or it may be the system is recalibrating a bit.

HTR was removed with the update, some say it is replaced with 90 or 95%, but either way, HTR is 87-88%.

Adding range comes from better efficiency and regen, so not unusual. My commute is downhill to the office, 65 miles. The first 30 miles I often add between 20-30 miles of range due to regen and super efficient 45 MPH driving. I have gone the first 30 miles with 15 mi/kWh efficiency and seen 50 miles added in absolute ideal conditions.
It must be a very steep hill from your house to work. And 15 miles per kWh? Wow, impressive. But on the way back from work, you have to climb that hill and that probably takes a huge amount of energy. I believe it consumes more when climbing than regens when going down, resulting in a deficit. I don't think I can do 45MPH on freeway as other drivers would give me the finger when passing me. Back to my car, I'll keep an eye on the numbers and take the car back to the dealership if this trend continues.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
It must be a very steep hill from your house to work. And 15 miles per kWh? Wow, impressive. But on the way back from work, you have to climb that hill and that probably takes a huge amount of energy. I believe it consumes more when climbing than regens when going down, resulting in a deficit. I don't think I can do 45MPH on freeway as other drivers would give me the finger when passing me. Back to my car, I'll keep an eye on the numbers and take the car back to the dealership if this trend continues.
Yup, lose a lot climbing back up hill. But have seen as high as 6.5 mi/kWh round trip. The 45 mph section is back roads, not interstate. That is the speed limit, but admittedly some pass me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,312 Posts
I experienced something unusual and like to know if anyone else is experiencing the same thing.
First of all, if you were charging to "hilltop" mode you were charging to ~90%. After the patch your Bolt will charge to ~95%. Second, you are talking GOM miles which is, and was an estimate based on previous use. After the patch it will start all over "learning" your driving habits. After several charges you should see similar mileage guesses to what you are used to, but about 5% higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
I have driving slowly for decades, way before getting into EV. 10% lower in speed saves more than 10% fuel. 10% more traveling time is a price I'm happy to pay. A small sacrifice to save my wallet, and perhaps the earth, without spending tens of thousands to buy a new car.

50% of my driving is on freeway at 63mph. With that I'm doing 4.4 miles per kWh overall. I took a short 40 miles road trip with my boy up to a local 6,000 ft mountain and back, all below 50mph. I got 6 miles per kWh.

People say it is suicidal to drive slower than 70mph on southern California freeways. It is a gross exaggeration. There are plenty of slow traffics in the slow lane. I just join the trucks and keep good clearance. I certainly will speed up if I am impeding traffic. I seldom have to.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Isn't it often the case that all lanes on a southern California freeway are slow lanes moving at 5-15mph?
In SoCal heavy traffic, I find driving in the "slow" lane is often faster.

There seems to be a general mentality that the left lane will always be faster, so people seem to go there in heavy traffic. There is also a lot more lane changing that seems to happen in the left lanes, and that tends to create accordion effects. The right lane is often metered to limit inbound flow, and unmetered to allow cars to exit unimpeded. That seems to open the lane to slightly faster travel times.

Since the advent of smartphones and popularity of texting, it seems people gravitate to the left lane to do their phone work. I refer to it as the cell phone lane. Inevitably, the slow moving vehicles in the "fast" lane are on their phones.
 

·
Registered
2020 Bolt EV LT
Joined
·
98 Posts
The software adjustment did something bad to my Bolt.
We should all wish for something "bad" like this to happen to our Bolts. :unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
In SoCal heavy traffic, I find driving in the "slow" lane is often faster.

There seems to be a general mentality that the left lane will always be faster, so people seem to go there in heavy traffic. There is also a lot more lane changing that seems to happen in the left lanes, and that tends to create accordion effects. The right lane is often metered to limit inbound flow, and unmetered to allow cars to exit unimpeded. That seems to open the lane to slightly faster travel times.
However, in some places, the right lane commonly has the following annoyances:

1. Slow on-ramp mergers -- the ones who will try to merge in at 20mph lower than the right lane traffic (which is typically not going that fast to begin with).
2. When not metered, strings of tailgaters behind #1.
3. Approaching a heavily used exit, more traffic than one lane can handle at freeway speed tries to crowd in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
However, in some places, the right lane commonly has the following annoyances when it is flowing at a reasonable speed (not a 5-15mph jam):

1. Slow on-ramp mergers -- the ones who will try to merge in at 20mph lower than the right lane traffic (which is typically not going that fast to begin with).
2. When not metered, strings of tailgaters behind #1.
3. Approaching a heavily used exit, more traffic than one lane can handle at freeway speed tries to crowd in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
However, in some places, the right lane commonly has the following annoyances:

1. Slow on-ramp mergers -- the ones who will try to merge in at 20mph lower than the right lane traffic (which is typically not going that fast to begin with).
2. When not metered, strings of tailgaters behind #1.
3. Approaching a heavily used exit, more traffic than one lane can handle at freeway speed tries to crowd in.
I alternate between the slow lane and the next one, mostly stay in the slow lane. It has been a long while since I was in fast lane. I start feeling out of place when I shift into the middle lane.

Many times I recognize the car I stop behind on the off ramp. It was the same car that passed me at high speed several miles back. That tells me going faster may not always arrive soon. It often does thought. Just not by the same percentage.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
I alternate between the slow lane and the next one, mostly stay in the slow lane. It has been a long while since I was in fast lane. I start feeling out of place when I shift into the middle lane.

Many times I recognize the car I stop behind on the off ramp. It was the same car that passed me at high speed several miles back. That tells me going faster may not always arrive soon. It often does thought. Just not by the same percentage.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
I tend to stay in the second to the right lane. In CA, semi trucks tend to stay in this lane, and if you camp behind one, their speed is pretty consistent, as their drivers tend to look further ahead in traffic and adjust accordingly. I've found on longer trips that Swift-branded trucks tend to be glued to 55 mi/hr. Must be company policy, and/or they have monitoring equipment to gather speed data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,403 Posts
In SoCal heavy traffic, I find driving in the "slow" lane is often faster.
I used to drive between San Diego and L.A. often. I had it down to an art. Left lane is usually fastest with fast moving traffic. When coming up to a slowdown, I would get into the second lane from the left as it will usually move faster, often continuing to move while the far left lane is at a dead stop. If it's a really bad/long slowdown, the third lane from the left is better but be ready to move left as traffic starts clearing. I always avoid the right lane because I hate dealing with people who don't know how to merge onto the freeway. But when coming up on a major freeway intersection, I would sometimes get all the way over on the right as traffic exits to the other freeway, but then get back over to the left before the incoming traffic from that freeway merges in.

Then there were the late night trips where I would find a "runner" (faster moving car). I would follow this car, a ways back, and look for them to hit the brake lights as they spotted a cop or trigger the lights on a cop car. This was few years back so I'll use the young and stupid excuse.

Lately I've been trying to slow down because of how people drive here in Phoenix, but old habits die hard.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Slow on-ramp mergers -- the ones who will try to merge in at 20mph lower than the right lane traffic (which is typically not going that fast to begin with).
In CO, we have a lot of TX transplants. If you have ever driven in Houston, you know about the horrible frontage roads that have freeway entrances and exits, with super short merge lanes.

You can always tell the recent Houston migrants, they are the ones who stop when merging on the freeway.
 

·
Registered
2017 Bolt
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First of all, if you were charging to "hilltop" mode you were charging to ~90%. After the patch your Bolt will charge to ~95%. Second, you are talking GOM miles which is, and was an estimate based on previous use. After the patch it will start all over "learning" your driving habits. After several charges you should see similar mileage guesses to what you are used to, but about 5% higher.
Start all over "learning"? Must be the case. I missed that. Thanks.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top