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There are a lot of links to figure out how much power you will need and how many panels it would take. Look at the power draw that you need from your units.
Add them together and you will see how much it takes. You will definitely want an extra deep cycle battery for the power to go into. Hook your inverter up to it,
then add your panels. Many people go with flooded 6 volt in series to get what they seek. I prefer 12 volt AGM for ease of use. More expensive but, you are adding
to a $30K Plus car and using for vacation so . . .
 

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"How much would that be worth to you?"
I'd pay at least a dime…
A dime wouldn't even buy you 1 kWh from the grid where I am. That will get you less than 4 miles (per EPA).

In the end, though, I would still agree with you. Let me put that panel on my rooftop where it will produce much more energy over time (always oriented nearly south, and at a better elevation angle than the roof of a vehicle).
 

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There are a lot of links to figure out how much power you will need and how many panels it would take. Look at the power draw that you need from your units.
Add them together and you will see how much it takes. You will definitely want an extra deep cycle battery for the power to go into. Hook your inverter up to it,
then add your panels. Many people go with flooded 6 volt in series to get what they seek. I prefer 12 volt AGM for ease of use. More expensive but, you are adding
to a $30K Plus car and using for vacation so . . .
If you're going for solar with battery/inverter, I'd suggest going with lithium instead of AGM. While lithium is more expensive, it has a number of benefits that make it worth it:
  • Significantly lighter
  • Longer lasting (at least four times longer cycle life)
  • Far higher energy density (you can actually use a majority of its cycle without damage -- unlike AGM)
  • Better Coulombic efficiency (>99% versus ~90%)
 

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I'd forego batteries in any scenario where one is grid-connected and there is net-metering. The grid then acts as the battery, and pays you as if it's 100% efficient.

Heck, I'd forego batteries in any scenario where there is a grid connection. Generators are very affordable and provide limitless energy so long as there is sufficient fuel.

Solar on an EV is dumb. Way more efficient to install it on a roof or other more optimally located area.

Anyone read how horrible solar was for charging batteries in "The Martian"? It's great if it's your only option, but then what catastrophe lead to that being your only option?
 

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I'd forego batteries in any scenario where one is grid-connected and there is net-metering. The grid then acts as the battery, and pays you as if it's 100% efficient.

Heck, I'd forego batteries in any scenario where there is a grid connection. Generators are very affordable and provide limitless energy so long as there is sufficient fuel.

Solar on an EV is dumb. Way more efficient to install it on a roof or other more optimally located area.

Anyone read how horrible solar was for charging batteries in "The Martian"? It's great if it's your only option, but then what catastrophe lead to that being your only option?
The generators that can actually recharge an EV (pure sine inverter generators) are large, complex, expensive, and inefficient. There's a reason many RV owners are switching from onboard generators and lead acid batteries to solar plus lithium batteries, and they aren't looking back. Now sure, the energy needs for home appliances (like those found in an RV) is far less than the needs for recharging an EV; however, that goes back to my earlier statement about setting proper expectations.

A 100 Ah LiFePO4 battery, 1,500 watt pure sine inverter, MPPT, and 400 to 600 watts of solar panels would make a smaller, more manageable package (possibly cheaper, too) for a Bolt EV owner who wants to go trekking and camping than an inverter generator and a tank of gas. Are you going to add a lot of range each day, even with an ideal setup? Nope. Spend a week camping, though, and you might be surprised with the results.
 

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I agree with the Lithium, Probably should have gone all the way to that rather than AGM. Prices are getting closer.
Lead Carbon seems like an interesting idea as well.
 
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