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Well, I've had my Bolt for about 9 months now. Still lovin' it. Just built and installed an OpenEVSE kit charger (actually I had a ticketed electrician do the 220v install). It's hard-wired in place, in the carport. Still fooling around with the rather complicated data logging feature, but the basic charger works great! Amazingly fast when you're used to the cheapie 110 unit. And the build wasn't that difficult, though the instructions could be improved for the first-time builder. Tech support was very responsive. Seems like a good unit so far. When I've got some statistics to report, I'll post screen shots.

I've scraped the underbody a couple of times on our rough rural roads and driveways. I'd sure like to find an aftermarket suspension kit that would increase the ground clearance by even 2 or 3 inches! It makes me nervous, all that very expensive battery down there just waiting to be schmucked by a rock, tree branch, gravel berm, etc. Dropped one side of the Bolt off a very deceptive suburban kerb (parking lot driveway wider than the actual kerb cut, high kerb, twilight, uphill, oncoming traffic, oh well) and there was a heckuva Whack (scared me!), but visual inspection didn't reveal anything and the car never complained.

Went in for the 6 month free checkup and tyre rotation, no problems found. Have to say Chevy dealer was very slow getting the car back to me -- they said initially about 45 minutes, and I got it over 2 hours later, almost missed a ferry!

A few little things I would change: I find I use "max defrost" intermittently in cold weather, rather than running the defroster all the time. Bursts of Max seem less expensive in lost range. But it's a bit awkward doing that by feel, so I wish Max Defrost was a switch on the steering wheel. Also that turning on Defrost did not activate the whole climate control system which I never use! (If you turn Max Defrost off with the physical button, the climate control system is still on; so you have to turn off the whole system with the virtual switch on the screen, which can't be found by fumble, you have to look. I don't like having to look at the console screen while driving.)

I find the driver's side pillar (with the wee triangular window) is a big blind spot; going into L hand curves I have sometimes had a small oncoming car pop into sight suddenly after hiding behind that pillar. Bit of a surprise at times.

The rearview cameras: at first I laughed at them. Now I'm a convert; I leave my rear view mirror in video mode full time. This overcomes the poor aft visibility. Have the habit now of wiping off the cameras as I pass by on my way to the driver's door :) I also used to laugh at the backup camera (with the range indicator and projected path of vehicle) and now I have to admit I'm hooked on that too.

Now it's the cold season so getting more expensive to keep the Bolt charged and happy, but compared to a gas car it's still cheap.

A weird film built up inside the windscreen (maybe something outgassing from the upholstery?) and required a pretty serious inside window-wash after a few months. I'm hoping it won't recur. Treated all the outside of windows with Rain-X -- very effective.

Silliest "smart" feature so far: I walk out to the car, crunching across the frosty mud of the parking lot; the world is glittering with frost crystals, and it's bloody cold. Scrape ice off the windshield. I get in the car, start it up, and a little text message on the glass dashboard informs me that I should be careful, there might be frost :) Yeah. Thanks for telling me, I'd never have noticed :)

Silliest "safety" feature so far: large screen popup that warns me that being distracted by my screen may cause dangerous driving. But this popup appears after I've already started away onto the road. So to dismiss it and play a tune, I have to look at the darned screen, which is what it's telling me I should not be doing.

Smartest safety feature so far: automatic drop in music volume when the car wants me to hear an audio alert (like pedestrian, oncoming object, etc).

High beams I find a little tricky -- when I pull to turn them off, I find it easy to overshoot and flash them. So sometimes when I'm trying to dim my high beams for an oncoming vehicle, I dim then rudely flash them instead. Gotta learn to pull more gently I guess; kinda like those darned auto/manual window switches which require a very light touch to use properly.

Anyway, if these are the biggest beefs I have with the car... then it's a pretty darned good car. I enjoy driving it, enjoy showing it off to other people, love the quiet and the sporty performance. Great music system (well, compared to anything I've ever driven). Comfy seats. Love that heated steering wheel, this time of year. No buyer's remorse here. If the car holds up, I'll drive it happily for the rest of my natural life (which actuarially speaking is probably about 15-20 years). Now if only Chevy would make a Bolt-based small pickup like the old 70's-80's Datsuns, Mazdas, Toyotas etc.
 

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I've yet to scrape the bottom of our Bolt. I did manage to do it a couple of times in our Golf TDI. One time I even drove the passenger-side back wheel over a curb at an intersection when I misjudged things.
 

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I've scraped the underbody a couple of times on our rough rural roads
We're recovering from recent rains and our dirt road was a mess. It was so rutted that I could hear the bottom of the car dragging on the high spots. Then today I washed the mud off my car and found damage to the front driver's side wheel well. Either I hit the front corner of the air dam or so much mud got inside the wheel well that it bent out the plastic corner of the air dam where it meets the wheel well. Now there's an opening in the wheel well cover that will fill with mud every time. Saw a rock drop into the crack and hope it doesn't rattle around in there.

It was a little unnerving trying to get traction right after the rain. With the stabilitrak on and with both wheels slipping, it felt like the car didn't want to keep moving. Kept having to push the accelerator down further than I was expecting to get the car to keep moving. Was so afraid of getting stuck if the car didn't keep moving. Without any engine rpm sound I couldn't tell how much the wheels were spinning.
 

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I find the driver's side pillar (with the wee triangular window) is a big blind spot; going into L hand curves I have sometimes had a small oncoming car pop into sight suddenly after hiding behind that pillar. Bit of a surprise at times.
I agree with many of your assessments, especially that the front left blind spot is terrible! When going through left-hand curves I have to scooch over and crane my head way to the right to see through the curve. And tonight I came close to creaming a pedestrian hiding there.

While the underbody can be scraped, it's really far better than with other cars. My friends with Prius and Mini Cooper can't get in and out of my driveway without a long drag, but I don't have any problem.
 

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Now if only Chevy would make a Bolt-based small pickup like the old 70's-80's Datsuns, Mazdas, Toyotas etc.
That's what I've been saying! And give it 300 mile range. Would be the perfect vehicle for me. Please post if you find a way to raise the car 2 -3 inches - same reason as you, dirt rocky roads.
 

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+1 on the blind spot, but I think something like it is required to pass rollover safety tests. The screen warnings were likely the idea of the corporate attorneys, cya. The film: yeah, plasticizers and other VOCs from seat fabrics, etc, which we are breathing too.
 

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Agree with most of your observations. The huge blind spot behind the center of the windshield and both windshield posts are criminal. Whatever the possible lives saved in the very rare rollover probably results in 10X the pedestrian and right/left collisions caused by the restricted vision.

Now if only Chevy would make a Bolt-based small pickup like the old 70's-80's Datsuns, Mazdas, Toyotas etc.
No thank you; I for one don't want to go back to the bad old days. Those buzzing, cramped little shitboxes were the most miserable things I ever drove and that was as seldom as possible.

jack vines
 

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Anyway, if these are the biggest beefs I have with the car... then it's a pretty darned good car. I enjoy driving it, enjoy showing it off to other people, love the quiet and the sporty performance. Great music system (well, compared to anything I've ever driven). Comfy seats. Love that heated steering wheel, this time of year. No buyer's remorse here. If the car holds up, I'll drive it happily for the rest of my natural life (which actuarially speaking is probably about 15-20 years). Now if only Chevy would make a Bolt-based small pickup like the old 70's-80's Datsuns, Mazdas, Toyotas etc.
Make it yourself, get a hold of Simone. :)

 

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Discussion Starter #16
No thank you; I for one don't want to go back to the bad old days. Those buzzing, cramped little shitboxes were the most miserable things I ever drove and that was as seldom as possible.
jack vines
Awww, you're so harsh on 'em. My first EV was a Datsun 1600 that I converted the hard way (transmission adapter plate, 20 golf cart batteries... now lead-acid, that was the bad old days). But seriously, I really miss quarter-ton small pickups. I cherish our '91 Mazda B2600i (even though the frame is, inexorably, rusting out and the writing is on the wall). I love that little truck. It's sweet to drive (5 on the floor) and a very willing, versatile hauler with a 6 foot bed and jumpseats.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
BTW, got the basic (remote) data logging working on the OpenEVSE charger. Will write a review when I have some nice pictures to post (graphed data, etc). So far I'm liking it very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Try pushing the stock away from you to toggle the high beams.
Oh dear, is it something that simple? I'll give it a try. I'm thinking old-school mechanical switches of course, push away to engage then pull back to disengage. But of course it's probably just a momentary that toggles state in one of the car computers. Have to remind myself that these days, most of the human/car interface is a game controller. How long before the old fashioned steering wheel is replaced by a joystick?
 
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