Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
2020 Bolt
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Over 4000 miles on my 2020 LT and I just realized something unusual. I adjusted the tire pressure to 40 all around right after delivery and I havn't had to add air since. The self sealing goo appears to make the tire immune (or close) to that seepage most new tires have. Filled with the usual 78% nitrogen blend that I've used all my life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
That, plus the Bolt wheels are of excellent quality. Many times tires get blamed for slow leaks when it's the wheel.

The only complaint I have is the tire/wheel combo is heavier than the hubs of ****.

Now that I think about it, IIRC, the sealant packets only cover the tread portion. It's probable the other 75% of the Michelins are just good tires.

jack vines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Rim leaks can still occur. Hopefully, the wheels will not corrode badly like some poorly protected aluminum wheels.
The road salt used in the winter up north will do it's best!


Maybe another factor could be the nature of Michelin's low rolling reisistance, efficiency focused tire makes it less prone to the micro seepages of air around the bead and valve stem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,521 Posts
Maybe another factor could be the nature of Michelin's low rolling reisistance, efficiency focused tire makes it less prone to the micro seepages of air around the bead and valve stem.
I don't know about the valve stem, but aren't stiffer sidewalls one of the characteristics of a low rolling resistance tire? If true, that might mean thicker sidewalls which are less prone to atmospheric migration...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
I don't know about the valve stem, but aren't stiffer sidewalls one of the characteristics of a low rolling resistance tire? If true, that might mean thicker sidewalls which are less prone to atmospheric migration...?
Yeah, thinking about the valve stem, it doesn't experience the forces that the tire does when moving, so probably a negligible, or non-existant, factor. Aside from actual punctures, the slow leaks I've had on tires (car and motorcycle) were solved by cleaning up the rim where the bead seats. Maybe the LRR tires with their stiffer sidewalls have less flex at the bead and holds air better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
I don't know about the valve stem, but aren't stiffer sidewalls one of the characteristics of a low rolling resistance tire? If true, that might mean thicker sidewalls which are less prone to atmospheric migration...?
Stiffer sidewalls are also 1 of the characteristics of run flats but it didn't seem to mitigate the need from adding air to MY 2017 & 2018 Chevys. At least what I considered too often. I haven't added air to my 2020 since I bought it 4 months ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,069 Posts
Stiffer sidewalls are also 1 of the characteristics of run flats but it didn't seem to mitigate the need from adding air to MY 2017 & 2018 Chevys. At least what I considered too often. I haven't added air to my 2020 since I bought it 4 months ago.
It could also be that warmer summer temperatures are compensating for air loss so you will not notice any difference in your cold inflation pressure... your cold inflation pressure is now 30 deg F "less cold" than it was in winter :)

Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
I have had to add air many times over the past couple years. Seems about like a normal tire in that resepect, at least for me.

Another thing to keep in mind about the sealing goop. We have no way to know how many small punctures they have successfully sealed. You just notice the fails..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
It could also be that warmer summer temperatures are compensating for air loss so you will not notice any difference in your cold inflation pressure... your cold inflation pressure is now 30 deg F "less cold" than it was in winter :)

Keith
That may apply to some but I live in South Florida.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I replaced the OEM Michelin self-sealing tires (which I HATED for no traction and mediocre handling) with regular tires that are neither run-flat nor self-sealing, and after 7k miles on the new tires noticed no difference in air retention. The tires I bought were low rolling resistance, since I treasure my range, and handle WAY better, have better traction, and no difference in range that I can detect (other users claim tire changes cause huge losses). The tires I bought and recommend are Vredestein Quatrac 5's, and they are well reviewed on both Tire Rack and Consumer Reports. Just get a tire plug kit, a can of sealer, and a GOOD portable compressor (look at what Tire Rack sells, and another quaity clue is that the pump connects to the battery, not the lighter socket)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,521 Posts
I have had to add air many times over the past couple years. Seems about like a normal tire in that resepect, at least for me.
I have to add air in the fall to compensate for lower temperatures, and then let air out through the spring. So I have absolutely no idea whether there's a net loss or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Another piece of good news is that my tire was able to self-seal a small sidewall puncture. I removed a piece of metal about the size and shape of a pine needle from the sidewall that was causing a slow leak. I was surprised it worked but it's held up for months now and thousands of miles.

People hate on them but I'm actually fine with the OEMs and the security blanket they provide. Hopefully we get more range reports so I can try something else but range is a huge consideration for me with 20-30 miles leftover from my commute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
I add air about once a year to my vehicles. They only lose ~4 PSI over the course of a year. That's my guess as I haven't actually tracked it, but it's so slow that that I don't notice the loss over many months of use. If a tire loses more than 5 PSI in a month, it's got a leak I can find and plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Another piece of good news is that my tire was able to self-seal a small sidewall puncture. I removed a piece of metal about the size and shape of a pine needle from the sidewall that was causing a slow leak. I was surprised it worked but it's held up for months now and thousands of miles.

People hate on them but I'm actually fine with the OEMs and the security blanket they provide. Hopefully we get more range reports so I can try something else but range is a huge consideration for me with 20-30 miles leftover from my commute.
I find it odd that a side wall puncture was sealed by the goo patch that only covers the inside area over the treads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,808 Posts
Another piece of good news is that my tire was able to self-seal a small sidewall puncture. I removed a piece of metal about the size and shape of a pine needle from the sidewall that was causing a slow leak. I was surprised it worked but it's held up for months now and thousands of miles.
I am glad your tire is not leaking. However, there is no conceivable way for this to be attributable to the sealant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I check the air pressure every month or 2. I have 2 different gauges, one digital and one mechanical that agree with each other. But, the TPMS readings I get from the phone app never match. I set all 4 tires at 40 psi, and the phone app will show most of them different by 1 to 4 pounds. I would think those sensors should be pretty accurate, but right now I don't trust them.
I am going to check there app vs the dash display to see if they agree...
Yep, they agree. So, I'll check again tomorrow and see what my gauges say vs the displays!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
I'll check again tomorrow and see what my gauges say vs the displays
My car's display is always off a couple psi because I live at high altitude. The sensors, being located inside the tire, can only read absolute pressure. But the car reports back the reading in gage pressure that is adjusted for sea level which is an error if you live anywhere besides zero feet above (or below) sea level. The only way they could fix this is by having a pressure reading outside of the tire to make the necessary adjustment to the absolute pressure reading of the sensor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I am glad your tire is not leaking. However, there is no conceivable way for this to be attributable to the sealant.
Ya, I looked at the cutouts. I guess I just pictured slime sloshing around the tire. Well in any case, something worked because it was definitely punctured in the sidewall and leaking when I found it.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top