Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Love my bolt EV but it did consistently give me and my family an irritating static shock.
A little research I found the culprit was most likely "low rolling resistance" tires use silica instead of carbon black as reinforcing agent, improving gas mileage, but decreasing tire's ability to diffuse static.

So - old school solution was to install a 'static strap' to my rear bumper assembly.

I have to say I was really doubtful this would work - But it has worked amazingly well. Have not had a single shock since it was installed.

Easy $7 fix.

People tell me I have something dragging from my car LOL
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
You have something dragging from your car.

Wonder if they have more options with the tires as they no longer have to worry about gasoline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Eliminating static electricity from vehicles is a constant problem due to low atmospheric humidity, especially in winter. As a child living in NYC I have seen plenty of trucks with chains dangling from their frames or bumpers, and I read about passengers who opened their door and were shocked unconscious as soon as they put their foot on the surface outside (they were discharging that vehicle's static energy completely through their limb).

Dragging a conductive strip will help even if it doesn't look "good", and that is preferred over having to pick up a passenger or yourself after stepping out. Or install solid steel wheels (no tires) and never accumulate static electricity, although the ride will be terrible!

Luckily for me, I live in sunny and eternally humid Puerto Rico where we never get static accumulation or winter. We only have "spring" and "summer".
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
3,521 Posts
You may also notice that the approach lane to most manned toll booths have a piece of flexible wire poking out of the ground to discharge vehicles by supplying a ground connection to the chassis. This is so the toll booth operator isn't thrown against the opposite wall every time they reach for the toll from the driver. I wonder if anyone has thought to collect the charge in a battery (or capacitor) to power the toll booth lights?

I like the strap solution, but I'd "hide" it somewhere closer to the middle of the vehicle, thus eliminating most "is something falling off your car?" comments.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
3,521 Posts
i think if you just hold on to a metal part of the car (door, for example) as you step out you won't get shocked.
The whole car can be charged up with static as you drive, and insulated by the rubber tires. Holding something metal as you exit might make the discharge to ground *worse*. YouTube has some interesting videos of people starting fires by re-entering their ICE vehicle while it fills, then sliding across their seat (and charging up their body) when it's done filling, and discharging static into the fill hole full of gas fumes. *BOOM* This could be eliminated by grounding oneself to the pump prior to grabbing the nozzle. Fun with static!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,422 Posts
Love my bolt EV but it did consistently give me and my family an irritating static shock.
You may also notice that the approach lane to most manned toll booths have a piece of flexible wire poking out of the ground to discharge vehicles by supplying a ground connection to the chassis. This is so the toll booth operator isn't thrown against the opposite wall every time they reach for the toll from the driver.
YouTube has some interesting videos of people starting fires by re-entering their ICE vehicle while it fills, then sliding across their seat (and charging up their body) when it's done filling, and discharging static into the fill hole full of gas fumes. *BOOM*
Now, that's just weird. I've lived in very humid Alabama, dry CA and moderately dry WA, but never in sixty years has any of my myriad vehicles, including our Bolt, ever shocked me nor any of the hundreds of tankfuls of gasoline exploded at the pump. Been served at countless drive-throughs without killing an attendant.

How is static electricity such a catastrophic disaster waiting to happen and I've never experienced it while driving? Yet another thing for which to be thankful.

jack vines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,380 Posts
The whole car can be charged up with static as you drive, and insulated by the rubber tires. Holding something metal as you exit might make the discharge to ground *worse*. YouTube has some interesting videos of people starting fires by re-entering their ICE vehicle while it fills, then sliding across their seat (and charging up their body) when it's done filling, and discharging static into the fill hole full of gas fumes. *BOOM* This could be eliminated by grounding oneself to the pump prior to grabbing the nozzle. Fun with static!
To minimize the pain, you can just grab anything conductive on your body (your house keys, your watch, your bracelet) and make sure you have a large patch of skin contacting that conductive object. Then touch ONLY the metal object to a metal part on your car and you'll equalize to the potential of the car. That should prevent static shock across a small collection of nerves which hurt more than spreading the shock across a large surface.

You might even hear/see the shock as your conductive object comes in contact with the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
The whole car can be charged up with static as you drive, and insulated by the rubber tires. Holding something metal as you exit might make the discharge to ground *worse*. YouTube has some interesting videos of people starting fires by re-entering their ICE vehicle while it fills, then sliding across their seat (and charging up their body) when it's done filling, and discharging static into the fill hole full of gas fumes. *BOOM* This could be eliminated by grounding oneself to the pump prior to grabbing the nozzle. Fun with static!
nope. you're really only getting a charge from rubbing on the seat.

http://www.physics.org/article-questions.asp?id=44

sebzips could try it out for us by removing the strap, and then hanging on to the door when he gets out of the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,203 Posts
Now, that's just weird. I've lived in very humid Alabama, dry CA and moderately dry WA, but never in sixty years has any of my myriad vehicles, including our Bolt, ever shocked me nor any of the hundreds of tankfuls of gasoline exploded at the pump. Been served at countless drive-throughs without killing an attendant.

How is static electricity such a catastrophic disaster waiting to happen and I've never experienced it while driving? Yet another thing for which to be thankful.

jack vines
You don't wear polyester clothes, right? Synthetic fabrics are hydrophobic, and can build up quit a charge...cotton not so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
To minimize the pain, you can just grab anything conductive on your body (your house keys, your watch, your bracelet) and make sure you have a large patch of skin contacting that conductive object. Then touch ONLY the metal object to a metal part on your car and you'll equalize to the potential of the car. That should prevent static shock across a small collection of nerves which hurt more than spreading the shock across a large surface.

You might even hear/see the shock as your conductive object comes in contact with the car.
A decade ago I had a Chevy Lumina that would shock me almost every time I got out of the car. I developed a habit of touching the door frame with my forearm or elbow as I got out of the car because I hardly felt the shocks there, while they could be painful on the fingertips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i tried that

I read that as well and it made me doubt the effectiveness of the strap, but it has made a 100% difference. I used to hold the metal on the door while stepping out - the shock would still happen where I was holding the metal - as soon as my foot touched the ground. Mind you, it was not painful - just irritating and my 11 yo son hates it.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
3,521 Posts
nope. you're really only getting a charge from rubbing on the seat.

http://www.physics.org/article-questions.asp?id=44

sebzips could try it out for us by removing the strap, and then hanging on to the door when he gets out of the car.
Physics or not, talk to someone who has worked in a toll booth without the static discharge thingies. Their stories are literally hair-raising.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top