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My apologies in advance if anyone has posted this yet; my searches didn't turn up anything that looked like this was covered.

Has anyone noticed if their Bolt pulls to one side under heavy acceleration? I've noticed this often, if I'm trying to beat a light, for example, when I "punch it," the car seems to kind of pull to one side even if I'm going straight. It's almost as though there were gyroscopic/centripetal forces yanking the car to one side, and then I would have to quickly compensate to keep going straight. When I let up on the accelerator, the phenomenon stops. I would like to know if anyone else noticed this, or if this is a defect. I could understand if the engine was turning so quickly it was indeed acting like a huge gyroscope.
 

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first world problems for early adopters learning to drive cars with instant torque - ROFL this is soooooooo not a problem - and common for front wheel drive cars…
 

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several reviewers mentioned a bit of torque steer in their reviews. my first experience with torque steer was from a front wheel drive turbo charged Plymouth Laser back in the early nineties. Wow, that was 195HP. Where the Bolt has 200HP. Can only imagine that the Bolt would.
 

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I agree - it is pretty well controlled on the Bolt. However, traction control can be fooled by a road with a noticeable crown or tilt, so that might be your issue.
 

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FWD absolutely sucks for performance cars for this reason. Front tire spin and torque steer equal a lame experience and time lost. Traction control only makes it more lame. The Bolt is a compromise in many ways in an attempt to appeal to many people. 200 hp and sport mode appeals to folks like me, but FWD appeals to most people living in snow.
 

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...FWD appeals to most people living in snow.
I love my front wheel drive cars. No, I'm not a performance nut - just an ordinary everyday driver. But my FWD cars behave far more predictably in wet and snowy conditions, and in all the ICE vehicles I've had the compact drivetrain arrangement means more space in the car for people and cargo.
 

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It is made much worse by the crappy grip of the tires. A tire starts spinning and the traction control tries to apply the brakes to the spinning tire resulting in even more erratic behavior. Others on the forum report that the torque steer is much more controlled with tires with better grip such as high performance summer tires. However, you will probably give up some range in the process.

You can not punch it but what fun is that?
 

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I currently drive a 2010 Subaru Forester and test drove a Bolt a few days ago. The difference is night and day. The Bolt has a huge torque steering problem as shown in the drive train diagram at the end of this article:

https://insideevs.com/deep-dive-chevrolet-bolt-battery-pack-motor-and-more/

The drive shaft lengths are not equal and it appears that the designers did not implement the fixes described in the Wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_steer

Take a look at how a real design is implemented:

https://www.subaruofkeene.com/subaru-all-wheel-drive.htm

To me this is a deal breaker. I was ready to trade in and buy but the test drive went so bad that I could not do it. Stopping on dry pavement was way longer than my forester and resulted in significant wheel skid. Moderate acceleration from a stop turning right resulted in wheel spin mid turn and temporary loss of control. Moderate to above acceleration while going straight at 40 MPH resulted in significant pulling (I think to the left) and required me to fight the steering wheel to keep from hitting the car next to me. If I drive like the old man that I am, the car is fine but if the I need quick acceleration in an emergency or fun situation, the machine is quite difficult to control.

I should add that the BMW i3 is crazy zippy as well and does not spin the tires and is very controllable accelerating on corners and straight on (highway and at 40MPH). It also stops quicker. I think the i3 is lighter due to smaller battery capacity and composite materials used. It seems to be a better design from a driver standpoint (until you get stuck in the snow).

The Bolt to me has an unacceptable design flaw and solutions exist and have existed for years. I don't subscribe to replies to the original posting that this is normal as it is not. I drove a 1967 Oldsmobile Tornado (425 hp front wheel drive) through my teens and this machine had zero torque steer issues. Not all front wheel drive cars have this issue.
 

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I currently drive a 2010 Subaru Forester and test drove a Bolt a few days ago. The difference is night and day. The Bolt has a huge torque steering problem as shown in the drive train diagram at the end of this article...
I keep hearing about this but for the life of my I've yet to experience it. I guess I just don't push my Bolt as hard as other people do.
 

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I hardly notice it anymore because my brain has made the adjustment. It's like holding the right rudder on takeoff. Don't even realize I'm doing it.
 

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Our 2016 Highlander Hybrid also has a fair amount of torque steer under heavy acceleration, so the problem is hardly unique to expensive econoboxes. It also seems to be a problem in expensive “pseudo-luxury” SUVs.
 

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Been driving RWD, AWD and 4x4s all my life, my first drive by wire, BEV, FWD, REGEN Braking car. A lot of things different and a lot of habits and training that need relearning. Yes torque steer is an issue, but I now have no problem with its squirrely nature. Thats not unique to this car either. It is unique to FWD cars, but unlike @trossin, I bought one after driving it and love every minute (except for the wipers in snow) driving it.

Did I have to learn, darn right it did, the first mad rip in the car caught me of guard, and I can see where people could get scared of it. But now I am used to it and ride that horse well. Even put her away wet! ;) No big deal. But i sure miss the power oversteer capabilities of a RWD car though :(. What I dont miss is trips to the pump.! :) Still working on what I learned a racing school about FWD cars that one can be 90 degrees to the road and one can pull out of oversteer by steering into the oversteer and powering out. Need a skid pad or at least a big empty space. :) I am pretty sure I see Autocross in its future.
 

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Solution: don't punch the accelerator to the floor when going around corners.
 
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Does the bolt have a limited slip type of differential or does power go to the wheel with the least traction?
 

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I currently drive a 2010 Subaru Forester and test drove a Bolt a few days ago. The difference is night and day. The Bolt has a huge torque steering problem as shown in the drive train diagram at the end of this article:

https://insideevs.com/deep-dive-chevrolet-bolt-battery-pack-motor-and-more/

The drive shaft lengths are not equal and it appears that the designers did not implement the fixes described in the Wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_steer

Take a look at how a real design is implemented:

https://www.subaruofkeene.com/subaru-all-wheel-drive.htm

To me this is a deal breaker. I was ready to trade in and buy but the test drive went so bad that I could not do it. Stopping on dry pavement was way longer than my forester and resulted in significant wheel skid. Moderate acceleration from a stop turning right resulted in wheel spin mid turn and temporary loss of control. Moderate to above acceleration while going straight at 40 MPH resulted in significant pulling (I think to the left) and required me to fight the steering wheel to keep from hitting the car next to me. If I drive like the old man that I am, the car is fine but if the I need quick acceleration in an emergency or fun situation, the machine is quite difficult to control.

I should add that the BMW i3 is crazy zippy as well and does not spin the tires and is very controllable accelerating on corners and straight on (highway and at 40MPH). It also stops quicker. I think the i3 is lighter due to smaller battery capacity and composite materials used. It seems to be a better design from a driver standpoint (until you get stuck in the snow).

The Bolt to me has an unacceptable design flaw and solutions exist and have existed for years. I don't subscribe to replies to the original posting that this is normal as it is not. I drove a 1967 Oldsmobile Tornado (425 hp front wheel drive) through my teens and this machine had zero torque steer issues. Not all front wheel drive cars have this issue.
The Bolt has a minor torque steering issue that’s easily controlled.

Many Subarus (including Foresters) have a major engine design flaw that causes severe oil consumption. No car is perfect, but I would personally avoid a manufacturer that sells cars with defective engines, year after year after year, and lies about it.

Just google Subaru excessive oil consumption, it’s a major issue, and there’s already been a class action settlement affecting hundreds of thousands of cars over many years and models.

No piston rings in the Bolt, and it hasn’t used even a quart of oil in 5k miles.
 

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I keep hearing about this but for the life of my I've yet to experience it. I guess I just don't push my Bolt as hard as other people do.
Punch it hard halfway through a turn, you’ll feel it. I’m familiar with torque steer, it’s simply not a big deal once you’re aware of it, and easily controlled and/or avoided, mostly by not punching it hard halfway through a turn.
 
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