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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
About a month ago my 2018 Bolt stopped charging to the full 250 miles (approximate). Full charge shows only about 150 miles now. Other performance seems to be the same. I'm trying to avoid taking in the car to the dealer if I don't have to during this time. Any suggestions on what this could be?

Thanks!!
 

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It is unfortunate that folks are not aware of this great tool before they buy a Bolt. But once you have a problem it is definitely a good idea. At many dealerships, you can save a huge amount of wasted time, if you can come in with data in hand to point to where the problem is.


Lots of threads about sudden battery capacity loss on the forum.


 

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We have two Bolts, who have kept their milage capacity quite nicely. If that happened to me, I'd be at the dealer the next day. Start thourghly documenting, even running logs of calls to the dealer, receipts, etc. Also, start recording the details of your charges, etc. Best of luck !
 

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Hi All,
About a month ago my 2018 Bolt stopped charging to the full 250 miles (approximate). Full charge shows only about 150 miles now.
The range is just a guess based on your recent driving habits, it's no more an indication of battery capacity than the distance you can travel on a tank of gas is an indication of the tank's size. You can't drive nearly as far if, for example, you're driving at high freeway speeds, you're driving up mountains, or due to numerous other factors.

Don't panic until you've checked your battery capacity using one of the methods described in the threads linked to by GJetson.
 

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Hi All,
About a month ago my 2018 Bolt stopped charging to the full 250 miles (approximate). Full charge shows only about 150 miles now. Other performance seems to be the same. I'm trying to avoid taking in the car to the dealer if I don't have to during this time. Any suggestions on what this could be?

Thanks!!
Welcome to the forum. If you have a cell going bad in your battery, it will continue to drop pretty quickly based on observations of other forum member's experiences. At some point, the car might inform you through OnStar that it needs to be serviced. 150 miles range still could be explained from a sudden change in driving habits. Like driving 85 mph with the AC blasting on your last trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks. I'll go to the dealer. It's been like that for the past month so I'm guessing it would not be the sudden change in driving habits... Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi All,
I need advice. My bolt just spent two days at the dealer and in summary, the dealer has no idea why the drop in charge. They confirmed that I was getting on average 141 miles of charge. They ran full diagnostics on the electrical system/ battery and no red flags. He essentially said they don't know why and he gave me the "Chevy EV Range Driving Tips" as he suggested that I was the cause. No other explanation. When I pressed him he told me that I can check with another dealer. I responded "don't you have someone at Chevrolet - maybe a senior engineer - that you reach out to when you need help. He said "No". And then he said "Chevy is not going to ship a $10,000 battery replacement if we cannot show them a diagnostic".

There must a range of expected charge to each car. 200 miles if you drive 85 miles per hour with the A/C (random numbers for example) to 260 for those EV efficient drivers. I cannot imagine 141 miles. I use my car to drive around the city. I do not charge every night and wait until I reach about 75 miles.

I was a happy camper for about 14 months getting around 250 miles of charging until this dropped to 140 miles. Nothing changed in terms of my driving.

Any suggestions on next steps?

Thanks
RG
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What about "evidence-based practice"? It's crazy for a dealer and/or GM to absolve themselves of any responsibility by saying "yes, we confirmed your maximum 141 mile charge but our diagnostics did not show any codes/ red flags. Nothing more we can do". This is like purchasing a new GM Corvette and going into a dealer and saying "My new Corvette does not go past 50 MPH" and the Service Manager responds "yes, we saw that same behavior but did not see any issues on the digital diagnostic. We can't do anything."

btw, as I was leaving the dealership I saw the Service Manager and had the exact same conversation with him. So this response was not an isolated opinion from my Service Advisor.

The Service Advisor also gave me the Chevrolet 800 number. Should I be wasting my time with customer service? Any suggested strategy there?

Thanks...
 

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What about "evidence-based practice"? It's crazy for a dealer and/or GM to absolve themselves of any responsibility by saying "yes, we confirmed your maximum 141 mile charge but our diagnostics did not show any codes/ red flags. Nothing more we can do". This is like purchasing a new GM Corvette and going into a dealer and saying "My new Corvette does not go past 50 MPH" and the Service Manager responds "yes, we saw that same behavior but did not see any issues on the digital diagnostic. We can't do anything."

btw, as I was leaving the dealership I saw the Service Manager and had the exact same conversation with him. So this response was not an isolated opinion from my Service Advisor.

The Service Advisor also gave me the Chevrolet 800 number. Should I be wasting my time with customer service? Any suggested strategy there?

Thanks...
Looks like their response is tailored to what GM is telling them... no code, no coverage. You may have to call GM directly or file a complaint with your local DA or something like that.
 

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Many years ago, I had a similar issue with a Honda Civic Hybrid. Took to dealer, same thing, sorry, no code, nothing that we can do.
A couple years later, after warranty had expired, it finally threw a code. Took it in, told them, that I had brought it in for the same issue
while still under warranty. They checked their records, then told me that I would be betting a new battery pack at no charge. Of course,
this was after several major lawsuits about the same thing.
I have discovered that there are Pro dealers, and dealers that you wish to stay away from. What is the reputation of THIS dealership
towards EVs. The person / people that you spoke with, don't sound like people I would wish to deal with. GM didn't seem to be all
for EVs, but with things seeming to go that direction, perhaps there is a NEW or renewed interest. I would try the 800 number and see
what they have to say.
 

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Looks like their response is tailored to what GM is telling them... no code, no coverage. You may have to call GM directly or file a complaint with your local DA or something like that.
Local DA? As in you think a crime has been committed? Any warranty issues are civil issues, which is where the lemon laws reside. If someone can find all the necessary elements of a conspiracy and knowingly implicate executives of wrongdoing, the DA will be the LAST person you want to bring 'that' up to. But while I have you, have you seen a professional to discuss where some of your idea's come from? Go to maps.google.com and type in; "local therapist" and call the first one on the list.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks, everyone. An attorney friend suggested I file with the City Attorney of Los Angeles. In my eyes, this is consumer fraud. A business cannot advertise "238 miles of electric range on a full charge" and only deliver on 141 miles and not be held accountable. That's fraudulent advertising, warranty coverage or something else. In addition, I plan to reach out to certain media relationships that I can reach.

Bottom line this is bad business. This is not the way you treat any customer - current or prospective - and definitely not the way to treat a customer that is going on a second Chevy EV (former Volt owner). I'm comforted to hear that I am not the only one.

If anyone has any emails of Chevrolet Corporate Communications and/or Executive Management please send me a private message.
RG
 

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Doesn't the battery warranty state it will be replaced if it loses more than 40% of capacity?
How is that determined?
 

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Good lord, the time for attorneys and media is after a problem is un-resolvable... you haven't even called the number they gave you for GM corporate yet, and you are talking about fraud?

We in this forum are on your side, this has to be resolved most likely with a section of the battery being replaced. I am not saying you don't have a right to be pissed off at the dealership involved and their lack of giving a crap.

BUT

You not only haven't investigated the problem yourself (yes, not your responsibility... but resolving the problem is to your benefit even if you have to do a bit of work) by using torque pro and a cheap OBDII dongle to check your individual cell voltages. If you check your cell voltages, and call the GM corporate number given to you by the dealership with the pertinent information the problem will get resolved.

Get a grip,

Keith
 

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I went through almost the same process several years ago with my Mitsubishi Miev. It turned out to be pure ****. They insisted that their mysterious diagnostic machine indicated no problem even though the car had lost 50% of its battery capacity. Turned out that they were colluding to avoid replacing the battery. I resorted to Yelp, leaving a scathing review of the the dealer on their Yelp site. The owner of the dealer contacted me later that day. After guaranteeing that I would get a new battery, I agreed to drop the review. Best of luck...
 

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I agree with the bad review.
Manufacturers and Dealers are used to people huffing and puffing, but, seldom anything comes of that from the customer end.
If on the other hand, you are able to convince people to NOT deal with them, then it hits their pocketbook and they will pay
attention.
 

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Hi All,
I need advice. My bolt just spent two days at the dealer and in summary, the dealer has no idea why the drop in charge. They confirmed that I was getting on average 141 miles of charge. They ran full diagnostics on the electrical system/ battery and no red flags. He essentially said they don't know why and he gave me the "Chevy EV Range Driving Tips" as he suggested that I was the cause. No other explanation. When I pressed him he told me that I can check with another dealer. I responded "don't you have someone at Chevrolet - maybe a senior engineer - that you reach out to when you need help. He said "No". And then he said "Chevy is not going to ship a $10,000 battery replacement if we cannot show them a diagnostic".

There must a range of expected charge to each car. 200 miles if you drive 85 miles per hour with the A/C (random numbers for example) to 260 for those EV efficient drivers. I cannot imagine 141 miles. I use my car to drive around the city. I do not charge every night and wait until I reach about 75 miles.

I was a happy camper for about 14 months getting around 250 miles of charging until this dropped to 140 miles. Nothing changed in terms of my driving.

Any suggestions on next steps?

Thanks
RG
I would try customer service. The problem may involve something more subtle and GM may be interested in digging into it a bit deeper. However I would not be surprised that part of this conversation has already occurred with the dealer.

Sometimes problems can be very tricky to find. The mechanic is pretty much at the mercy of the diagnostics and if he cannot see anything wrong he really does not know what to change. It could easily not be the battery. If it's some odd software bug if may take some more digging. I could see something like this leading to a lemon law suit.

You could try the OBDII diagnostics. You want to watch the cell voltages as the battery level goes down. You are looking for one or more cells that are lower than the others.

This should have already been done. If no fault is found, it would not be unheard of for the dealer to take the car and drive it for a few days in order to confirm the complaint. If confirmed and no diagnostic errors are found, the next step would likely be to start swapping parts. It would help a lot if GM was more involved. GM has a dealer support hierarchy and it can take some time to get the local GM dealer rep involved. I would suspect something like swapping a battery, even if for diagnostic purposes, would take quite a lot. Basically it can become a dance. Dealers hear a lot of extremely stupid requests and they rely on their standard procedures to work. A little honey and support from GM can't hurt.

I would not be surprised that the problem is not the battery at all. Then again, you never know till you dig into it.
 

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There must a range of expected charge to each car. 200 miles if you drive 85 miles per hour with the A/C (random numbers for example) to 260 for those EV efficient drivers. I cannot imagine 141 miles.
If you're expecting 200 miles of range when driving at 85MPH then I think your expectation may be unrealistic, particularly if you have a 2017 thru 2019 Bolt. 141 miles of range is about 60% of the rated EPA range for pre-2020 Bolts, which to my gut feels like it could be about right for that kind of speed.

This graph comes from this thread on Speed vs Efficiency:

 

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This is the reason I got Torque Pro and a $15 OBDII dongle: so I can keep an eye on my cells. I have not had a problem but if I ever did and the dealer denied doing anything, I can print out the voltage of all 96 cells in about 5 minutes to prove there's at least one bad cell causing the problem.

Mike
 
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