Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
  • Hey Guest, welcome to ChevyBolt.org. We encourage you to register to engage in conversations about your Bolt.
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

Registered
Joined
286 Posts
Perhaps lightning can strike the same place twice.

https://insideevs.com/chevrolet-bolt-battery-died-twice-why/

His car is an early 2017 build.
Thanks for the info. Sucks to be that dude.
As someone in manufacturing, you can have a 6 sigma event, even if the process is under control. That's how statistics work. They're effectively admitting their process wasn't under good control, but that also is typical to find and improve as you go along.

Unclear if that guy is asking for some free stuff, but I would be.

We had the drivers side airbag go off while at freeway speed in our Malibu. [Diagnosis was the mirror controls are on the same circuit as the airbag, so mirror movements longer than 5 secs "armed" the airbag, plus something about the controller under the driver's seat and rubbing, I forget the exact details.] Both our local dealer and Chevy corporate had the proper and timely response. We were given a brand new premier level as our free rental while Chevy corporate investigated our car. That was our first experience with heated seats and it was right at Girl Scout cookie season, so my daughter and wife had warm butts as she was out selling cookies. That was about 10 years ago, and it still comes up. I realize now we could have pressed for some pain and suffering money, but we didn't BECAUSE we felt taken care of and that was mostly because of how they handled it.

Hopefully, something similar happens to that guy and to anyone else who's had major troubles.
 

Registered
Joined
5,054 Posts
I know, I know. I shouldn't be suspicious. But in addition to the serious stroke of bad luck for just a random Bolt EV owner, what are the chances that that Bolt EV owner also happens to be a writer for an online EV publication that has been critical of GM and the Bolt EV?

I'm not saying he invented the story, but that's an interesting coincidence that's difficult to overlook. Is it possible that he might have attempted to crack the battery (physically or software code) at any point? He already stated that he was using an OBD2 device to try to see what was going on. He might not have wanted to admit to a $15,000 boo boo.
 

Registered
2017 Premier
Joined
1,282 Posts
He already stated that he was using an OBD2 device to try to see what was going on. He might not have wanted to admit to a $15,000 boo boo.
You, I, and many other Bolt owners use an "OBD2 device" to monitor info about our Bolts on a regular basis.

Edit: For me it's almost essential because my car stopped talking to OnStar less than 2 months after purchase so if I didn't have Torque nobody would be monitoring my cell voltages (I am planning on having the dealer try to fix that and a few other issues when I bring my car in for the BMS update this spring)
 

Registered
Joined
776 Posts
I have a Jan 2017 bolt. So far, 19000 miles and no issues except infotainment bugs.

I feel for the guy. I understand that he is the victim of a bad cell group out of 296 but GM needs 100% perfect parts for consumers cars or they have to eat a lot of extra costs.

I am disappointed that Mary Bara lied about not replacing a single pack. There is no other way to interpret what she said. She flat out lied.

Words have meaning. Use them properly.
 

Premium Member
Joined
2,576 Posts
I know, I know. I shouldn't be suspicious. But in addition to the serious stroke of bad luck for just a random Bolt EV owner, what are the chances that that Bolt EV owner also happens to be a writer for an online EV publication that has been critical of GM and the Bolt EV?

I'm not saying he invented the story, but that's an interesting coincidence that's difficult to overlook. Is it possible that he might have attempted to crack the battery (physically or software code) at any point? He already stated that he was using an OBD2 device to try to see what was going on. He might not have wanted to admit to a $15,000 boo boo.
I don't think he's "making news" so to speak, but including the "and that one pregnant lady that had her Bolt die on her on the highway!" line sure screams of Electrek-esque anti-GM sensationalism.
I'm reminded of the story where one Tesla owner kept taking his Tesla to the service center because a fuse kept blowing. Tesla added some tamperproof tape to the fuse box after the 3rd or 4th time he reported it happened, and after that, the blown fuse issue magically stopped forever.
 

Registered
12/16 build, 2017, white LT
Joined
14,916 Posts
I know, I know. I shouldn't be suspicious. But in addition to the serious stroke of bad luck for just a random Bolt EV owner, what are the chances that that Bolt EV owner also happens to be a writer for an online EV publication that has been critical of GM and the Bolt EV?

I'm not saying he invented the story, but that's an interesting coincidence that's difficult to overlook. Is it possible that he might have attempted to crack the battery (physically or software code) at any point? He already stated that he was using an OBD2 device to try to see what was going on. He might not have wanted to admit to a $15,000 boo boo.
Eric,

You have completely gone off the rails at this point. Try breathing into a paper bag. I love your enthusiasm, but you are embarrassing yourself.
 

Registered
Joined
466 Posts
You, I, and many other Bolt owners use an "OBD2 device" to monitor info about our Bolts on a regular basis.

Edit: For me it's almost essential because my car stopped talking to OnStar less than 2 months after purchase so if I didn't have Torque nobody would be monitoring my cell voltages (I am planning on having the dealer try to fix that and a few other issues when I bring my car in for the BMS update this spring)
Pretty sure your car is still talking to Onstar. Even if you don't have an active plan, unless you have done something to sabotage the hardware, diagnostics are sent back over 4G LTE to the mothership.
 

Premium Member
Joined
2,576 Posts
Pretty sure your car is still talking to Onstar. Even if you don't have an active plan, unless you have done something to sabotage the hardware, diagnostics are sent back over 4G LTE to the mothership.
Yep. GM providing "free" basic Onstar service isn't exactly no strings attached free. ;)
 

Registered
Joined
585 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Although I never signed up for anything with OnStar, I still get monthly e-mails from them fourteen months after purchase. They always say my tire pressure is low (usually 34 psi) even if I just checked it. And I like to run it a bit low (36 psi), as the traction seems to be better.
 

Registered
2017 Premier
Joined
1,282 Posts
Pretty sure your car is still talking to Onstar. Even if you don't have an active plan, unless you have done something to sabotage the hardware, diagnostics are sent back over 4G LTE to the mothership.
No not talking about the OnStar plan, something spontaneously broke with my OnStar system from before the initial trial period even expired. I've called OnStar support about it several times (the OnStar button still works) and they had me try several things to try to fix it including disconnecting the 12V battery but nothing worked. Eventually they said I will have to have to bring it to the dealer for them to try to fix it. Since it's not a priority for me I haven't done that yet.

The only things I don't have (that I care about) due to the issue is I don't have the ability to remotely monitor my SoC with the My Chevrolet app and my Boltstats page is useless since it never updates.
 

Registered
Joined
5,054 Posts
You, I, and many other Bolt owners use an "OBD2 device" to monitor info about our Bolts on a regular basis.

Edit: For me it's almost essential because my car stopped talking to OnStar less than 2 months after purchase so if I didn't have Torque nobody would be monitoring my cell voltages (I am planning on having the dealer try to fix that and a few other issues when I bring my car in for the BMS update this spring)
My OBD2 adapter interferes with OnStar's ability to read data from my vehicle. That's why I try to make it a point remove it every now and then.

I am disappointed that Mary Bara lied about not replacing a single pack. There is no other way to interpret what she said. She flat out lied.

Words have meaning. Use them properly.
Her words were probably accurate. What she's been quoted as saying (what she did say) has been repeated without the context of the question that she was answering. The original article that shared her quote fully acknowledged that they didn't have access to the interviewer's question, and the question was most likely posed as a question about battery replacements due to degradation.

The battery recall and replacement is a well-known and highly publicized story. There would be no reason for Mary Barra to lie about it.

Eric,

You have completely gone off the rails at this point. Try breathing into a paper bag. I love your enthusiasm, but you are embarrassing yourself.
I'm just pointing out all of the coincidences (which have an astronomically low probability). The author basically acknowledged that he had been using an OBD2 interface, which could interfere with the car's software. Given the fact that both Nissan and Tesla have had issues with their BMS programming recently, it's quite clear that these systems are very sensitive.

I'm not saying that he cooked up a story, but the idea that he might have tried to sneak a peak at what was going on and screwed something up in the process seems just as likely as his being a two-time victim of an issue that has affected a fraction of a percent of owners. The entire story is just really weird either way, but the author's biased language was also unnecessary.
 

Registered
12/16 build, 2017, white LT
Joined
14,916 Posts
I'm not saying that he cooked up a story, but the idea that he might have tried to sneak a peak at what was going on and screwed something up in the process seems just as likely as his being a two-time victim of an issue that has affected a fraction of a percent of owners. The entire story is just really weird either way, but the author's biased language was also unnecessary.

I think this is a job for Occam's razor.
 

Registered
2017 Premier
Joined
1,282 Posts
My OBD2 adapter interferes with OnStar's ability to read data from my vehicle. That's why I try to make it a point remove it every now and then.
As do I to see if my cars OnStar problem miraculously fixes itself. But that really has nothing to do with you citing that as a reason for suspecting that the author might have done something to the car to cause his batteries to fail (and was committing warranty fraud).


Her words were probably accurate. What she's been quoted as saying (what she did say) has been repeated without the context of the question that she was answering. The original article that shared her quote fully acknowledged that they didn't have access to the interviewer's question, and the question was most likely posed as a question about battery replacements due to degradation.

The battery recall and replacement is a well-known and highly publicized story. There would be no reason for Mary Barra to lie about it.
It's possible that her words were technically accurate if in context but there's no escaping the fact that the answer was misleading. Even if the interviewer asked specifically about degradation instead of reliability an answer of "we've never replaced a battery (for degradation)" only says they have never had a Bolt or Volt lose more than 40% of it's battery capacity. It would be like saying I've never been convicted of a DUI and using that to suggest that I was a safe driver.

I'm just pointing out all of the coincidences (which have an astronomically low probability). The author basically acknowledged that he had been using an OBD2 interface, which could interfere with the car's software. Given the fact that both Nissan and Tesla have had issues with their BMS programming recently, it's quite clear that these systems are very sensitive.
Sorry this is just equine excrement, in fact it's the kind of tortured reasoning you often hear people make when trying to defend certain politicians when they have done something indefensible.

The simple fact is that GM provides very little in the way of information about our cars including energy usage and environmental/system conditions and pretty much anyone who's well informed about modern vehicles is going to know about OBD interfaces and apps like Torque. FTR Torque Pro has 1M purchases and installs in the Play Store, Torque Lite has over 10M. OBD to Bluetooth adapters are very popular on Amazon, these are all commonly used tools and I have never once heard of any carmaker even suggesting that it's a bad idea to use them. Nor have I heard of one ever causing problems with any vehicle.

In any case I run with Torque Pro 95% of the time and have for the better part of a year, I have a 2017 Bolt and am yet to have the first BMS update done. And if you might suggest that my "OBD Adapter" use is the reason my OnStar stopped working, my OnStar stopped working more than 2 months before I started using it. In fact the OnStar problem is what inspired me to dig my old OBD adapter out of the drawer where it had been sitting for several years.
 

Premium Member
Joined
2,576 Posts
As do I to see if my cars OnStar problem miraculously fixes itself. But that really has nothing to do with you citing that as a reason for suspecting that the author might have done something to the car to cause his batteries to fail (and was committing warranty fraud).




It's possible that her words were technically accurate if in context but there's no escaping the fact that the answer was misleading. Even if the interviewer asked specifically about degradation instead of reliability an answer of "we've never replaced a battery (for degradation)" only says they have never had a Bolt or Volt lose more than 40% of it's battery capacity. It would be like saying I've never been convicted of a DUI and using that to suggest that I was a safe driver.



Sorry this is just equine excrement, in fact it's the kind of tortured reasoning you often hear people make when trying to defend certain politicians when they have done something indefensible.

The simple fact is that GM provides very little in the way of information about our cars including energy usage and environmental/system conditions and pretty much anyone who's well informed about modern vehicles is going to know about OBD interfaces and apps like Torque. FTR Torque Pro has 1M purchases and installs in the Play Store, Torque Lite has over 10M. OBD to Bluetooth adapters are very popular on Amazon, these are all commonly used tools and I have never once heard of any carmaker even suggesting that it's a bad idea to use them. Nor have I heard of one ever causing problems with any vehicle.

In any case I run with Torque Pro 95% of the time and have for the better part of a year, I have a 2017 Bolt and am yet to have the first BMS update done. And if you might suggest that my "OBD Adapter" use is the reason my OnStar stopped working, my OnStar stopped working more than 2 months before I started using it. In fact the OnStar problem is what inspired me to dig my old OBD adapter out of the drawer where it had been sitting for several years.
I wonder if the fuse for your Onstar system blew and that's why it's not working (fuse F31).
 

Registered
2017 Premier
Joined
1,282 Posts
I wonder if the fuse for your Onstar system blew and that's why it's not working (fuse F31).
The folks at OnStar say they can talk to my vehicle but it's not reporting the data it should be. They keep sending it commands and it's acting like it's executing them but the behavior doesn't change. I think it's just a weird issue with my OnStar module and they will ultimately need to replace it or maybe re-flash the firmware.

My only real concern is that they will try to claim that when I installed my Dash Cam that I somehow broke it. I installed the Dash Cam after the OnStar issue came up and in any case it's powered off of the rear view mirror power supply via a T-Tap so I can't see how but I've seen dealers look for any excuse to deny a warranty claim when they don't want to fix something (or want to turn a flat rate job into a customer pay job) and they know most people won't bother to sue them for violating Magnuson鈥揗oss (I sure wouldn't since OnStar isn't that important to me)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top