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Tesla installed 8 super chargers at the Holiday Inn Express, here in Sequim, WA. I was blown away.
It appears to be battery-sourced, as the power available at this location can't provide 8 x 80kW. There is a large cabinet, about 1/2 the size of a cargo container. I assume that they use used batteries and keep them charged off of the grid.
Quite a surprise!

-Robert
 

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Superchargers are 400 volts x 400 amps 160,000 watts

Did they install superchargers or normal AC chargers?

Just found them - 8 super chargers at full capacity - probably not battery powered - commercial install with direct feeds from power companies!

Congrats!

BTW: like all DC Fast chargers the charge rate is tapered - recent Tesla's are limited to 125,000/140,000 watts maximum charge rate, but you often do not get that full charge rate unless your battery is nearly empty (just like the Bolt) - the wattage quickly tapers to more "modest" 100,000/90,000 watts as the battery approaches 50% and then goes down from there. Because of this while each supercharger is capable of 160,000 watts you never get that in practice due the limits of LiON battery chemistry - so the 160,000 watts is "shared" between two Tesla Superchargers - it's split between two stalls and if both cars plugged in are nearly empty then only one car will get full power - in practice this balances itself out in 10-15 min. of charging with the 1st car charging at nearly full tapering it's charge rate and the available load then ramps up the 2nd car plugged in so it gets a higher charge rate. Savvy tesla road warriors know about this splitting of the loads and if possible alternate the SC stalls they park at so that their car gets the full charge rate possible rather than sharing with other Tesla - the Stalls are labeled 1A/1B 2A/2B 3A/3B etc…if 1A is occupied you'll want to park in 2A/2B or 3A/3B to maximize your charge rate.

if two cars are >50% battery charge level then 160,000 watts is over kill and both cars while charging fast are not maximizing the 160,000 watt capacity of the SC

there is some talk of a 350,000 watt super charger - not that Tesla's would charge at that rate, but that would allow 4 stalls to share a load and most of the time the cars charging rate would be battery limited rather than charger capacity limited.

The Model 3 has slightly slower charge rates due to the smaller batteries and therefore splitting 4 stalls like this wouldn't really change the charge rate in any meaningful way and will probably be one of the ways in which Tesla grows charging stall capacity while not actually providing more power.
 

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Guess Tesla had an agreement with holiday Inn if all 8 of them are there. Maybe more will pop up at various Holiday Inn locations later on.
 

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Tesla is installing Superchargers at two new locations in WV, Clarksburg & Morgantown, through agreements with Sheetz gas station/food chains. Tesla is SO ahead of the game. When Model 3s fill the roads, the infrastructure to charge will already be in place, unlike the frequency and distribution of DCFC stations. From my location, No <200 mile range BEV can get to a DCFC. Only the Bolt with its 222+ mile range can get to the next nearest one, and then, only N or E, not S or W.
 

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Tesla installed 8 super chargers at the Holiday Inn Express, here in Sequim, WA. I was blown away.
You know, if Tesla made a small hatchback like the Bolt and if it was actually available to buy, then I'd be right on it. I admire Musk's vision. He actually believes in an electric future and he's both helping us to get there and also positioning himself to profit from it by installing such an extensive charging network.

If Telsa made that network available to other car makes for some sort of not-too-exorbitant fee I'd be happy to help support it.
 

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You know, if Tesla made a small hatchback like the Bolt and if it was actually available to buy, then I'd be right on it. I admire Musk's vision. He actually believes in an electric future and he's both helping us to get there and also positioning himself to profit from it by installing such an extensive charging network.

If Telsa made that network available to other car makes for some sort of not-too-exorbitant fee I'd be happy to help support it.
They do offer it to all automakers but as of yet, none have joined in. Not sure if it's pride, jealousy, cost, lack of vision? It's too bad 'cause the Bolt could be so much more if it had access.
 

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I have also heard Tesla installed another $9K on the starting price of Model 3, because the $35K version wouldn't be available until it's available, when it is available to whom it's available.
 

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I have also heard Tesla installed another $9K on the starting price of Model 3, because the $35K version wouldn't be available until it's available, when it is available to whom it's available.
The base model 3 for $35k should hit the configure page this fall so by end of year they should start popping up.
 

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The base model 3 for $35k should hit the configure page this fall so by end of year they should start popping up.
It seems that the volume production of the model 3 in any trim level, and the delivered quality of those units will only be settled by what happens in the next 3-6 months, and not by us arguing about it.

Personally I hope they knock this out of the park, because I want to see EVs succeed in general, and if they ship the volumes they are claiming, it will force the other manufacturers to get serious.
 

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You know, if Tesla made a small hatchback like the Bolt and if it was actually available to buy, then I'd be right on it. I admire Musk's vision. He actually believes in an electric future and he's both helping us to get there and also positioning himself to profit from it by installing such an extensive charging network.

If Telsa made that network available to other car makes for some sort of not-too-exorbitant fee I'd be happy to help support it.
Yep. I was all ready to get in line and put a deposit on a Model 3... then it was revealed that it was going to not be a hatchback and it was going to have the ridiculous interior/display/controls it now has. No sale for me. I will keep my eye on the Model Y, but it seems the company is going in a direction I don't care for.

I too would use their charging network, but it's not a big deal for me. I have no plans to travel anywhere with the Bolt beyond it's round trip range. I have gas cars for that.
 

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Both the BMW i3 and the Tesla Model 3 are RWD vehicles. The Bolt's FWD was a major selling point for me. Does the total weight (and the weight distribution) for EVs make this a non-issue? Are the batteries over the rear wheels just like putting 50# of kitty litter in the trunk? Is traction just as good with RWD? (Not that I would choose the i3 with its 120 mile {+60-70 miles via gasoline generator} range.) Don't get me wrong, I love my Bolt. But I wonder if I did not do diligent homework prior to my purchase, and just went with what I thought to be true.
 

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Both the BMW i3 and the Tesla Model 3 are RWD vehicles. The Bolt's FWD was a major selling point for me. Does the total weight (and the weight distribution) for EVs make this a non-issue? Are the batteries over the rear wheels just like putting 50# of kitty litter in the trunk? Is traction just as good with RWD? (Not that I would choose the i3 with its 120 mile {+60-70 miles via gasoline generator} range.) Don't get me wrong, I love my Bolt. But I wonder if I did not do diligent homework prior to my purchase, and just went with what I thought to be true.
What do you mean by "I wonder if I did not do diligent homework prior to my purchase, and just went with what I thought to be true."?

RWD is better for racing since you aren't asking the front tires to do all the work of both turning the vehicle, and accelerating it. Furthermore, acceleration causes the center of weight to shift back, placing more weight over the rear wheels. More weight means more traction. A FWD vehicle loses traction as weight shifts away from the front.

FWD tends to be safer for the average driver since understeer is generally more controllable than oversteer. That said, electronic stability control can do a lot to mitigate the tendency of RWD vehicles to oversteer.
 

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Both the BMW i3 and the Tesla Model 3 are RWD vehicles. The Bolt's FWD was a major selling point for me. Does the total weight (and the weight distribution) for EVs make this a non-issue? Are the batteries over the rear wheels just like putting 50# of kitty litter in the trunk?
I like front wheel drive because it means I only need two snow tires on the front wheels in the winter. The rear wheels don't do a whole lot more than hold up the back end of the car. I drive conservatively in slippery conditions and have never had any issues with just snow tires on just the drive wheels in front wheel drive cars.

It helps that we don't usually get very much snow here in Vancouver, and that I don't commute with the car and so I can pick and choose when I go out. Still, I've travelled upcountry and had to plow through 6" of snow or more on plenty of occasions, and never had any trouble doing so.

The only time I've ever gotten stuck was in some soft ground I parked on overnight with the summer tires on the car. I had to wedge some branches in there to get myself going again.

Using only snow tires on the drive wheels also leads to not having to rotate the tires - since the front summer tires aren't on the car as long as the rears the extra wear caused by transmitting propulsion power and steering the vehicle is roughly balanced by the reduction how long they're used. It's not exact, but again over 40 years of owning front wheel drive cars it's worked out very well for me.
 

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I like front wheel drive because it means I only need two snow tires on the front wheels in the winter. The rear wheels don't do a whole lot more than hold up the back end of the car. I drive conservatively in slippery conditions and have never had any issues with just snow tires on just the drive wheels in front wheel drive cars.

It helps that we don't usually get very much snow here in Vancouver, and that I don't commute with the car and so I can pick and choose when I go out. Still, I've travelled upcountry and had to plow through 6" of snow or more on plenty of occasions, and never had any trouble doing so.

The only time I've ever gotten stuck was in some soft ground I parked on overnight with the summer tires on the car. I had to wedge some branches in there to get myself going again.

Using only snow tires on the drive wheels also leads to not having to rotate the tires - since the front summer tires aren't on the car as long as the rears the extra wear caused by transmitting propulsion power and steering the vehicle is roughly balanced by the reduction how long they're used. It's not exact, but again over 40 years of owning front wheel drive cars it's worked out very well for me.
I must respectfully disagree with the above, Mr. Nelson. Since it works for you, we can't argue with your experience, but it shouldn't be taken as a general recommendation. Just know using snow tires only on the front of an FWD is bad science. You've gotten away with it because you say you drive conservatively. However, the unexpected happens; on a downhill curve, something requires a panic stop. The heavily loaded fronts with snow tires grab. The lightly loaded rears with summer tires can't and suddenly the car is spinning downhill like a top. Bottom line, all FWD car manufacturers and all snow tire manufacturers recommend they be fitted on all four corners.

Bridgestone states:

No matter what kind of vehicle you drive, never mount two winter tires on the front axle without also mounting them on the rear axle. Only installing snow tires on the front wheels increases the risk of losing rear tire traction while braking or cornering on wintery roads. This is because the back wheels will have less grip than the front wheels, a scenario that can throw you into a rear-wheel skid.
Tire Rack states:
Intuition suggests that since the front tires wore out first and because there is still about half of the tread remaining on the rear tires, the new tires should be installed on the front axle. This will provide more wet and wintry traction; and by the time the front tires have worn out for the second time, the rear tires will be worn out, too. However, in this case, intuition isn't right...and following it can be downright dangerous.

"When tires are replaced in pairs...the new tires should always be installed on the rear axle and the partially worn tires moved to the front."
jack vines
 

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...Just know using snow tires only on the front of an FWD is bad science. You've gotten away with it because you say you drive conservatively. However, the unexpected happens; on a downhill curve, something requires a panic stop. The heavily loaded fronts with snow tires grab. The lightly loaded rears with summer tires can't and suddenly the car is spinning downhill like a top.
While what you say may be true, IMHO the real error in this situation is the need to make a panic stop in snow, especially on a downhill curve. That's likely to get you into trouble no matter what tires you're using.
 

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yep

Yep. I was all ready to get in line and put a deposit on a Model 3... then it was revealed that it was going to not be a hatchback and it was going to have the ridiculous interior/display/controls it now has. No sale for me. I will keep my eye on the Model Y, but it seems the company is going in a direction I don't care for.

I too would use their charging network, but it's not a big deal for me. I have no plans to travel anywhere with the Bolt beyond it's round trip range. I have gas cars for that.
I had a Model 3 reservation but I cancelled it when my Bolt was built and ready for shipping. One of the things that really attracted me to the Tesla was the charging network. From where I am in Iowa I could go to every major metropolitan area in the upper Midwest (Chicago, Milwaukee, Green Bay, St. Louis, Omaha, and the Twin Cities) and be able to charge at a supercharger somewhere in between. We have three super chargers running along I-80 now in Iowa, with two more under construction along I-35, and another one along I-29.

Other than the Twin Cities I don't usually go that far. If I was going on a real long road trip and there weren't DC chargers along the route I'd probably rent a vehicle for the trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Tesla installed 8 super chargers at the Holiday Inn Express, here in Sequim, WA. I was blown away.
It appears to be battery-sourced, as the power available at this location can't provide 8 x 80kW. There is a large cabinet, about 1/2 the size of a cargo container. I assume that they use used batteries and keep them charged off of the grid.
Quite a surprise!

-Robert
Additional info on this station:

There are 4 super chargers that pull 131KVA each for one vehicle being charged, 160KVA each when two vehicles are being charged. Connected load = 4X160 = 640KW. The estimate their peak demand is somewhat lower at 534KVA.
Tesla Super Charger Specifications:

· The Supercharger pulls 192A at 480/277VAC at 100% load (160kVA).

· The Supercharger has a .99 power factor (158kW at 100%).

· Each Supercharger serves 2 charging posts

· 24/7 Operation Capability

Utility Service Electrical Requirements:

· Current design features (4) superchargers, each capable of pulling 192A and 480/277VAC (160kVA).

· Total connected load is 768A at 480/277VAC (640kVA). We anticipate the actual maximum peak demand to be 642A at 480/277VAC (534kVA).


See attached images.

For a more detailed explanation of what the Supercharger Deployment project is please visit http://www.teslamotors.com/supercharger.

It's sad to see so much capability for just the Tesla. So far, I've not seen more than one vehicle there.
 

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You know, if Tesla made a small hatchback like the Bolt and if it was actually available to buy, then I'd be right on it. I admire Musk's vision. He actually believes in an electric future and he's both helping us to get there and also positioning himself to profit from it by installing such an extensive charging network.

If Telsa made that network available to other car makes for some sort of not-too-exorbitant fee I'd be happy to help support it.
Model Y to be announced. I must admit, I am waiting for this one also.
 

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Model Y to be announced. I must admit, I am waiting for this one also.
I'm keeping my eye on it too for the future. There is much I like about Tesla and their products, but if the Model 3 is an indicator of the direction the company is heading, It's likely not what I'll be getting. I am no fan of the iPlank dashboard and all the autonomous driving stuff. I would very much like Adaptive Cruise Control, but other than that I see no up side and much down side to the robot supposedly doing the driving.
 
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