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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1) PlugShare shows "Level 2" non-Tesla EVSE without regard to the power provided (40 amp, 32 amp, 16 amp; no voltages {206V, 240V}; or even the wattages corresponding to the voltage/amperage).

2) Planning travel without knowing if you will get 25 miles per charging hour or 10 mpch makes it nearly impossible to make a trip.

3) Tesla Superchargers are NOT available to Bolts.

4) Tesla Level 2 chargers are proliferating like wildfire.

5) J1772 to Tesla Plug Adaptors for Level 2 charging are available (obviously not illegal).

6) If not "free" there is a way to pay for the juice, no matter which plug you use.

Questions:

1) Are all Tesla Level 2 (destination charging) EVSE the same voltage/amperage/wattage?

2) What is that power level?

3) Would this make it more "suitable/preferable" to buy a $250 adapter and just plan to use Tesla chargers along a route where Level 3 does not exist?
 

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Would this make it more "suitable/preferable" to buy a $250 adapter and just plan to use Tesla chargers along a route where Level 3 does not exist?

Many of the Tesla destination charge locations also have a clipper creek Level 2 EVSE with a J1772 at the same location. If you look for Tesla connectors on plugshare and also see a J1772 it is likely that Tesla installed it at the same time when they were putting in the Tesla charging. The two hotels I charged at over Thanksgiving I used J1772 installed by Tesla (subcontractors).

Having the adapter could be a good idea as a back up but my luck with available Level 2 has been good. Not fast, but good...
 

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Plugshare does have a field to report power level for L3 chargers. I assume it is the same for L2?

However, most people don't use these fields when they do checkout. You are right in that this causes serious problems when you are trying to plan a trip. Wish I knew a good solution.
 

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Having the adapter could be a good idea as a back up but my luck with available Level 2 has been good.
I found a bad J-1772 plug at one hotel, and used my adapter to the Tesla charger with no problem. I think this is a likely circumstance, as these are pretty simple electrical plugs that can easily become worn and cause intermittent contact.
 

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Plugshare does have a field to report power level for L3 chargers. I assume it is the same for L2? However, most people don't use these fields when they do checkout. You are right in that this causes serious problems when you are trying to plan a trip. Wish I knew a good solution.
When on a long journey, the recording of such a lot of data, when you are bent on a nice meal someplace, is a bit tedious. Luckily, most EVgo chargers are 50 kW, and some of the others can be predicted. For example, most of the Chevy dealership chargers are 25 kW. Also, you soon can recognize which charger is which just from the picture on Plugshare.
 

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Tesla Destination Chargers tend to be at least 40 amps - but I've encountered less and more (some are 80 amps charging rate). The only way to know for sure is the review the plug-share comments or call the business owner.

As with all things there are no guarantees about anything.

There is nothing special about a Tesla destination charger - it's a Tesla wall mounted L2 charger - if you have an adapter and the charger's owner is willing to let you use it - it will work via the Tesla to J-1772 adapter. The charge rate provided by the charger will depend the type of installation the business owner opt'd for at install time. The charger itself is flexible and can be configured from 12 to 80 amps.

If the charge rate matters to you I recommend you call the associated charger owner and:

1. verify they will let you use it with the adapter for your Bolt
2. verify the charge rate it is expected to provide.
 

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Planning travel without knowing if you will get 25 miles per charging hour or 10 mpch makes it nearly impossible to make a trip.
I have never come across low power level 2 chargers. They have all tended to give me the required 32 amp, 6 kW, for a Chevy Bolt EV. Its going to be more variable if you are in an RV campground (30 amp, or 50 amp circuit) Its more important to worry about level 3 chargers. There a factor of two while on the road in the middle of the day is a big deal.
 

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Questions:

1) Are all Tesla Level 2 (destination charging) EVSE the same voltage/amperage/wattage?

2) What is that power level?

3) Would this make it more "suitable/preferable" to buy a $250 adapter and just plan to use Tesla chargers along a route where Level 3 does not exist?
1) no there is no standard value - although most tend to be at least 40 amps as a charge rate
2) depends on the charger and what installation the owner decided to install
3) yes - having the adapter will open up the set of Tesla L2 chargers as options for you on your trip - but it doesn't magically guarantee a particular charge rate, functionality, or a willingness of the business owner to let you use their chargers - it's buys you options, not guarantees.

Page 21 of the Tesla Wall Connect install manual details the possible charge settings - https://www.tesla.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/wall-connector-eu/wall_connector_installation_manual_80A_en_US.pdf?201612081439

12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80

although this doesn't tell the whole story- if the chargers are installed to share a single circuit (up to 4 chargers can share a circuit) - even an 80 amp charge install sharing 4 chargers will yield a 20 amp charge rate if there are 4 cars actively charging

so the answer is: it all depends and your millage may vary - or modified for EV terms - you charge rate may vary (YCRMV)
 

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Your life experiences with the type of folks that answer a phone question like that must have been Waaaayyyyyy... better than mine ;)
LOL - no it hasn't - but I occasionally get an informed response - normally I call to verify it's functional, available and has anyone recently complained about slow charging. I'm I'm polite I occasionally get a followup call where they can tell me what the AMP rating is on the breaker the chargers are using.

but yeah in practice the only way to know what a charger will put out is to plug in and see what happens!

given that all Tesla's come with at least a 40 amp charger (because the short range Model 3 is not yet shipping) most of these installs are at least 40 amps - I have run into 20 amp charger - but it was fine and still charged pretty well over night.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Many of the Tesla destination charge locations also have a clipper creek Level 2 EVSE with a J1772 at the same location. If you look for Tesla connectors on plugshare and also see a J1772 it is likely that Tesla installed it at the same time when they were putting in the Tesla charging. The two hotels I charged at over Thanksgiving I used J1772 installed by Tesla (subcontractors).
And are all these Clipper Creek EVSE 7.2 kW? And what if it is blocked and the three Tesla plugs are free?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
When on a long journey, the recording of such a lot of data, when you are bent on a nice meal someplace, is a bit tedious. Luckily, most EVgo chargers are 50 kW, and some of the others can be predicted. For example, most of the Chevy dealership chargers are 25 kW. Also, you soon can recognize which charger is which just from the picture on Plugshare.
You are talking Level 3 DCFC of which the entire State of WV has NONE (not even at any of our Chevy dealerships, of which <5% will sell/service the Bolt).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have never come across low power level 2 chargers. They have all tended to give me the required 32 amp, 6 kW, for a Chevy Bolt EV. Its going to be more variable if you are in an RV campground (30 amp, or 50 amp circuit) Its more important to worry about level 3 chargers. There a factor of two while on the road in the middle of the day is a big deal.
Both WV Chevy dealerships I used during my 350 mile return from buying the Bolt provided only 16 amps (3.3 kW) necessitating 30 hours of charging and 2 overnight stays (instead of the one planned motel stop). From Hagerstown, MD to Huntington, WV no 7.2 kW stations were encountered. And, there are no DCFC in the entire State.
 
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