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I had a coworker that drove his car the 3/4 mile he lived from work. Laziness. Many (most?) people default to what is most convenient to them.
Who "defaults" to doing what is most inconvenient for them? While I do get your point that many will avoid an inconvenience, even if it's better for them, I find it hard to fault anyone for wanting personal convenience.
 

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Who "defaults" to doing what is most inconvenient for them? While I do get your point that many will avoid an inconvenience, even if it's better for them, I find it hard to fault anyone for wanting personal convenience.
I'm not faulting people, just pointing out a flaw endemic to humanity.

We're not good at making cost/benefit analysis. For instance, that 2 minute drive my coworker was making is the most severe operating conditions for the vehicle since it never warms up. The emissions are worst during this period of time too. He utilizes a parking space that would otherwise be free for others, he misses out on the daily opportunity for brief physical exercise...

Another example is how the vast majority of products at a store are purchased from "eye level", meaning people grab it because it's the first thing they see and it's easy to reach, not because it's the most ideal product, or best cost.

To answer your question, I'm the type to inconvenience myself after having assessed the cost/benefit proposition. I've got an engineering mind though, so optimization is always top of mind for me.
 

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The best way to reduce pollution (and traffic) is $10 a gallon gasoline.

Keith
Ah, this is why I hang around this forum. Less Tesla and more pointless heckling and arguing lol.

Pollution and traffic are complex issues that can't be solved with $10 gas. The downstream effects would be massive. Suburban expanses are crippling and bankrupting cities all across north america. They cause massive amounts of pollution and ecological destruction and also cost more than the tax revenue they bring in. Suburban expanses are poor options for raising a family too, and perpetuate a government subsidized culture of debt.
 

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Suburban expanses are poor options for raising a family too
Hmm... I think there are definite issues with the "suburban expanse", but I can't say that I understand that statement.

I had lived in what could be considered part of the suburban expanse. My young daughter was allowed to walk down the street to friends homes without a worry and I'd leave my garage door open all day and evening, without a worry. With my daughter grown and moved away, I moved to a smaller, urban home. It is convenient but there are homeless/drug addicts on the corner down the street and occasionally walking down the alley. I keep my garage closed and letting a young girl walk down the street by herself is definitely not advised. That said, there's plenty of families with young children in the area and as long as you take the realities of the area into consideration, I think it's perfectly okay.

But I don't see how the suburban expanse is necessarily a poor option for a family. Perhaps you can enlighten me.
 

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Urban living will increasingly become a moot point as distributed work becomes more commonplace. I expect a massive expansion of suburbs as people are no longer required to live in the city to minimize their commutes. Dense living will then become primarily a decision of preference, and as demand drops for residential property within the city, it becomes more affordable.
 

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Hmm... I think there are definite issues with the "suburban expanse", but I can't say that I understand that statement.

I had lived in what could be considered part of the suburban expanse. My young daughter was allowed to walk down the street to friends homes without a worry and I'd leave my garage door open all day and evening, without a worry. With my daughter grown and moved away, I moved to a smaller, urban home. It is convenient but there are homeless/drug addicts on the corner down the street and occasionally walking down the alley. I keep my garage closed and letting a young girl walk down the street by herself is definitely not advised. That said, there's plenty of families with young children in the area and as long as you take the realities of the area into consideration, I think it's perfectly okay.

But I don't see how the suburban expanse is necessarily a poor option for a family. Perhaps you can enlighten me.
I had a long paragraph written but it was pretty piss poor. Everything I would have said is in this video. I also forgot to post a video when I mentioned "suburbia as a ponsi scheme" because this person does a better job explaining it. Better than strong towns or literature explaining that feedback loop.
I feel stupid for not referencing any resources when I used the aforementioned term.
If I could have kids I certainly wouldn't raise them in the suburbs just on the fact that it perpetuates a culture of debt and that it removes autonomy from children.
 

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If I could have kids I certainly wouldn't raise them in the suburbs just on the fact that it perpetuates a culture of debt and that it removes autonomy from children.
Very noble of you. I mean that sincerely. Most people do their best to live their lives the best they can within the reality around them, not alter their lives to some ideal they wish could exist.

But I'm not sure what the big deal is with autonomy. I had a lot of autonomy as a child which essentially meant that I was able to do things I shouldn't and get away with it. I think Independence is more important and the whole "helicopter parenting" is the damaging thing, and that happens whether you're in a suburb or not.

I didn't really get the "culture of debt" thing from the video. I moved to the suburbs to spend less on a house and go into less debt so I don't get the connection. Some people move to the suburbs to get "more" house than they could otherwise get, but they still look for the same price range.

But I do think the biggest hope for reducing the problem was touched on in the video. The danger from cars. Once we get to fully autonomous vehicles there could be a significant change.
 

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I live in a suburb of a "city" of 10k. We can walk everywhere. I think the small city will make a comeback.

Interesting to see all those bicycles unlocked. Such a society can exist when there is enough stability and enforcement of rule of law, and cultural regard for community. I don't know of any large US city that one could regularly leave an unlocked bicycle. Meth and vagrancy has destroyed them.

Large metros need to not have naked men sleeping across the sidewalks, needles in the parks, and feces in the streets before people will be comfortable letting their children mill about. I'm among the least overprotective parent (in US terms) but would never let my child walk about in SF. I have friends who have been raped in Portland. Large metros are in decline. Bask in the progress!
 

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Just for starters, the lower classes spend a far larger percentage of their income on fuel. They also are least able to afford to live near where they work and less likely to be able to afford a newer EV. So you are placing the greatest burden on them. Some may have to quit their jobs located far from their lower cost housing. And lot's of other domino effects and unpredictable consequences will follow, just on that one aspect.

Ideas like this often create more problems than they solve, which is what the politician want because they get to once again claim that if you vote for them, they will fix the problems.

P.S. I know it's well-meaning and I truly believe that, with few exceptions, we all want what works out best for everyone. But still, **** is paved with good intentions.
Weather raised over night, or slowly over time in the real world it would lead to suffering in the poor. The OBJECTIVE would be to spend the $7.00 a gallon in extra fuel taxes on public transportation infrastructure (electric buses, electric light rail etc.)... but we know that politicians can't keep their hands out of the cookie jar and most of the fuel tax revenue would be spent on special interest groups and campaign donors. So the extra tax on fuel would not hurt the poor, the mishandling of the revenue generated by the tax on fuel would hurt the poor.

If the tax was raised over night, the idea of spending it on infrastructure would lag behind by years, resulting in suffering in poor comunities. If it was raised incrementally over time, the "there isnt' enough to spend on infrastructure YET, so in the mean time, lets spend it on X, Y, and Z" excuse would come into play... and the infrastructure would never get built, but the increased tax would keep going up year after year.

Keith
 

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Public transit is a legacy model. Once self-driving is ubiquitous, there will be no demand for buses at any price (including free). Buses aren't efficient either in the US. Not only do the fares not come anywhere near covering the cost to operate, but petrol buses are more polluting than cars. The passenger miles per gallon are abysmal because they mostly operate at low capacity.

All tax income should be collected into a single pool and distributed based on most effective use of those funds. Special interests interfere at every step in that process.

Can you imagine if we ran our personal finances like the government. Somehow we fall short on our food budget, and rather than pull back on our discretionary spending, we just starve, because our budgets are strictly allocated.
 

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Public transit is a legacy model. Once self-driving is ubiquitous, there will be no demand for buses at any price (including free).
There isn't enough road space for shuttling everyone around in their own single-occupancy vehicle, particularly when you add in a whole new tranche of zero-occupancy vehicles dead-heading to their next gig. Unless we all end up in those small towns you expect to proliferate.

Transit benefits just as much from automation as individual cars do, and has the economies of scale (both geometric and economic) that are essential to moving people around dense cities.
 

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There isn't enough road space for shuttling everyone around in their own single-occupancy vehicle, particularly when you add in a whole new tranche of zero-occupancy vehicles dead-heading to their next gig. Unless we all end up in those small towns you expect to proliferate.

Transit benefits just as much from automation as individual cars do, and has the economies of scale (both geometric and economic) that are essential to moving people around dense cities.

Distributed work will reduce the demand for commuting.
AI driving and traffic management will vastly improve efficiency. Ever see someone making a left turn leave a gap ahead of them so large you could fit a 747 in there? AI will eliminate that inefficiency.
It's been estimated that 40% of Urban traffic is people looking for parking. I've circled for 90 minutes trying to park a vehicle before.

When the marginal cost to have a private taxi pick you is small enough, nobody will want to take a bus. If the cost to take a 15min trip is $4 vs $3, people will want to save time and have their own cab.
 

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So, any news on the Tesla CCS1 <-> SC adaptor ?
 

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Distributed work will reduce the demand for commuting.
AI driving and traffic management will vastly improve efficiency. Ever see someone making a left turn leave a gap ahead of them so large you could fit a 747 in there? AI will eliminate that inefficiency.
It's been estimated that 40% of Urban traffic is people looking for parking. I've circled for 90 minutes trying to park a vehicle before.

When the marginal cost to have a private taxi pick you is small enough, nobody will want to take a bus. If the cost to take a 15min trip is $4 vs $3, people will want to save time and have their own cab.
An easier solution is one we have been using for a very long time: buses, trains and trams. Plenty of countries get along just fine with their public transit. Buses take up less space than personal taxi cabs, require less material because it is one vehicle carrying 40 people rather than 40 cars carrying one persons. Also, buses are anonymous, can be paid to ride with cash, centralize the repair and maintenance and reduce total infrastructure needed. Really we need to be working towards a safer and smarter future where our cities are car free and you can rent a car or take long range public transit when going outside of the city.
 

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Well, there's a Tesla CCS1 <-> SC adaptor being sold in Korea, and a Chinese company is selling one in the U.S.

Does anybody in the U.S. have a Tesla branded one?
 
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