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Discussion Starter #1
So today I took a coworker's father in law for a ride in the bolt. He's 84 and had all sorts of questions about the Bolt and Tesla. I took him for a spirited ride one trip around the parking lot and had him grabbing the the "ohh schtuff" handle that isn't there. He said it was a far cry from his 34 Ford back in the day. He remembers the days before sealed bearings where you touched up the oil in the water pump bearings every time you put gas in. He was astonished when I told him the maintenance schedule (150,000 miles change the cooling loop glycol).
 

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I had an aunt, by marriage, who drove an electric during the early 1920s. It had the big Edison batteries, plugged into her night lamp pole outside, and got her all around Indianapolis for shopping, and going to her teaching position.
 

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Actually, the owners manual says the coolant and brake fluid should be changed every five years or 150,000 miles. But who's counting? It's the only shop service required for the life of the vehicle, although many owners are probably quite capable of performing these tasks themselves too. The battery may no longer hold over 50% charge at around the same mileage, but that's pretty much the expected life of a vehicle.
 

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This is why the seniors (such as myself) are the best candidates for EVs, because they probably cannot do the common ICE servicing anymore and spend thousands to pay others for those jobs ( I can still do them). The Bolt EV seats are higher than most sedans and not as high as in CUVs and SUVs, so they can enter and exits with little or no special effort. My mother-in-law cannot climb into our Chevy Equinox without help (she is 90 years old). And the Bolt EV's rear floor is FLAT from door to door making sliding in and out of the rear bench seat very easy.

This older group is growing, and GM is losing the sales potential by NOT marketing the Bolt EV for them. I only see ads for younger drivers. With the Bolt EV, seniors can live with it and still have fun!
 

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Actually, the owners manual says the coolant and brake fluid should be changed every five years or 150,000 miles. But who's counting? It's the only shop service required for the life of the vehicle, although many owners are probably quite capable of performing these tasks themselves too. The battery may no longer hold over 50% charge at around the same mileage, but that's pretty much the expected life of a vehicle.
Changing antifreeze used to be as easy as emptying, and refilling a bathtub. At some point they went from simple systems that could be drained by gravity, to systems with parts below the drain plug, and lines that act as traps, requiring a vacuum purge system. Be aware that the system in the Bolt absolutely requires a vacuum system. Watch the Weber Auto videos.
 

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Agreed. I've talked to several EV salesmen, and they consistently mention that the majority of EV customers are seniors. In general, marketing efforts by EV companies is poor - likely limiting the amount of potential sales.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I had an aunt, by marriage, who drove an electric during the early 1920s. It had the big Edison batteries, plugged into her night lamp pole outside, and got her all around Indianapolis for shopping, and going to her teaching position.
That's awesome, thanks for sharing! I never thought about charging from a lamp post, but I guess that's where the electricity was in that era!

Found some tidbits about the Detroit Electric car.... we've never had a standardized electric plug! ha! "By 1910, the company was making 800 cars annually, peaking at 1,893 six years later. This was also the year the Electric Vehicle Association of America introduced a standard charging plug – in three sizes – for all electric vehicles."

 

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Discussion Starter #10
I love the idea! Shopping centers have lamp posts too! Big companies like Blue Cross and Verizon have lamp posts in their parking lots.

I politic'ed at work like crazy earlier this year to get permission to put an EVSE on a lamp post in the parking lot. I finally got the OK, dug out the prints for the parking lot and realized that all the parking lot lights are controlled from one contactor inside the building so there's no juice in the day time on any of the pole... ****.
 

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I love the idea! Shopping centers have lamp posts too! Big companies like Blue Cross and Verizon have lamp posts in their parking lots.

I politic'ed at work like crazy earlier this year to get permission to put an EVSE on a lamp post in the parking lot. I finally got the OK, dug out the prints for the parking lot and realized that all the parking lot lights are controlled from one contactor inside the building so there's no juice in the day time on any of the pole... ****.
If you are going that far to do this job, add a new relay with a photoelectric sensor at the chosen pole so the lamp will turn on at dusk and off at dawn by itself (public street lights have this type of device at the top of the lamp housing like a plastic cap). Then have that circuit separated with a new breaker and turned on all day to power the EVSE.
 

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If you are going that far to do this job, add a new relay with a photoelectric sensor at the chosen pole so the lamp will turn on at dusk and off at dawn by itself (public street lights have this type of device at the top of the lamp housing like a plastic cap). Then have that circuit separated with a new breaker and turned on all day to power the EVSE.

I suspect that the approval was given assuming that the solution would be low-cost. Running a new, dedicated power line to a particular pole would probably be cost-prohibitive.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you are going that far to do this job, add a new relay with a photoelectric sensor at the chosen pole so the lamp will turn on at dusk and off at dawn by itself (public street lights have this type of device at the top of the lamp housing like a plastic cap). Then have that circuit separated with a new breaker and turned on all day to power the EVSE.
I’m not sure they would let me retrofit some of the posts with photocells, but it’s a **** of an idea. I think every two rows are one one wire, so I might be able to install one photo cell on the first one (or each one) and put the EVSE on the first post (or all on those two rows). I’d just take the wire that powers those two rows and move it from the dusk / dawn contactor to it’s own breaker. Thanks for the idea!
 

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Here’s the parking lot at work....
Do you know if SCE&G has any off peak rates or programs? I called but the person who answered was pretty clueless and took my info for another department to call me back.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Where are you in Columbia? I'm in Sumter.... if you are close to the Dorn VA center, would you mind doing a drive by in their parking lot and see if there's an EVSE there? Just curious.
 

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Where are you in Columbia? I'm in Sumter.... if you are close to the Dorn VA center, would you mind doing a drive by in their parking lot and see if there's an EVSE there? Just curious.
I do live near there and can check it out. I'm in a neighborhood called Shandon. I doubt the VA has one. It's not on plugshare. There is a Ford dealer right near the VA with a charger but I've never used it. I just saw that there is a new paid EVGO fast charger up near there too at the Library.
 
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