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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I usually tell it as it is.

The Bolt (actually all electric cars) suck in the winter. Horrible, horrible, horrible.

Normally I get 5-6 miles per kwh of electricity during the warmer weather. I get now 3 with heat running at 65 degrees- yes, I am going to run the cabin heat as I refuse to fight foggy/ frozen windshields and frozen feet. My impact screen shows my technique pegged to the right and all other variables pegged to the left. What a sorry azz picture :)

The low rolling resistance tires are bad in the cold. The hard rubber compound only gets harder in the cold and traction is limited. Car is heavy and does well overall on the slippery stuff, but the traction is just bad and stopping distances are not great compared to normal cars with all season tires.

Now more Bolt- specific:

The headlights have such a shape, that snow will stick to them and progressively will render them useless in heavy snow conditions

The automatic emergency brake only makes things harder as it cannot be used to rotate the car while in motion if it is understeering.

What the fcuk is wrong with the windshield wipers when snowing? They will get out of sync and start hanging in the middle of the windshield. Also their resting spot in the valley under the windshield is badly designed as it accumulates snow which only amplifies the out of sync wiper scenario.

Traction controll "off" should mean just that- dont you be turning on despite being off...

And there folks you have it
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My problem is that the Bolt can be made a bearable car in the winter, but GM has messed up a few things. Wipers, headlights, traction control. Those are things that are not specific to electric cars and GM being the company it is I fully expected to have those aspects nailed down by default... hence my dismay.
 

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My problem is that the Bolt can be made a bearable car in the winter, but GM has messed up a few things. Wipers, headlights, traction control. Those are things that are not specific to electric cars and GM being the company it is I fully expected to have those aspects nailed down by default... hence my dismay.
I suspect they may fix some of this in 2021. My hope is they at least keep making the Bolt. It is the only sensible, half affordable EV that you can buy outside the unicorn states. Tesla may someday make a sensible, small hatchback. I heard a rumor of a Model 2. But that may be pure speculation.
 

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My problem is that the Bolt can be made a bearable car in the winter, but GM has messed up a few things. Wipers, headlights, traction control. Those are things that are not specific to electric cars and GM being the company it is I fully expected to have those aspects nailed down by default... hence my dismay.
Can I add: No low washer fluid warning, no heat where the wipers rest, up-facing charge port that fills with snow and ice every time there is snow and ice.
 

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You are right in that all EV's suffer range loss in winter. Check out this Tesla owner's trip report:
.
 

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I usually tell it as it is.
As it seems to you. OK if not everyone agrees? Your opinions and results obviously vary, but can't agree with "Horrible, horrible, horrible"

The Bolt (actually all electric cars) suck in the winter. Horrible, horrible, horrible. Normally I get 5-6 miles per kwh of electricity during the warmer weather. I get now 3 with heat
And this is a surprise/disappointment how/why? If anyone could buy a BEV without understanding the range is significantly lower as the temperature gets lower? Isn't due diligence on the buyer?

FWIW, I've had every other shortcoming you mention on one or more ICE cars we've owned. There is no perfect car, especially at the deep discounts most here expect.

jack vines
 

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Can I add: No low washer fluid warning, no heat where the wipers rest, up-facing charge port that fills with snow and ice every time there is snow and ice.
I haven't had any issues with the charge port filling with ice and snow (at least not in a way that affected charging) but the fact that there is no washer fluid level warning and that even empty the washer fluid reservoir only holds 7/8 of a jug of washer fluid is frustrating.
 

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...the fact that there is no washer fluid level warning and that even empty the washer fluid reservoir only holds 7/8 of a jug of washer fluid is frustrating.
I just top off my washer fluid reservoir each time I do my monthly check of lights, fluid levels, etc. Never had a problem with it.
 

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I usually tell it as it is.

The Bolt (actually all electric cars) suck in the winter. Horrible, horrible, horrible.

Normally I get 5-6 miles per kwh of electricity during the warmer weather. I get now 3 with heat running at 65 degrees- yes, I am going to run the cabin heat as I refuse to fight foggy/ frozen windshields and frozen feet. My impact screen shows my technique pegged to the right and all other variables pegged to the left. What a sorry azz picture :)

The low rolling resistance tires are bad in the cold. The hard rubber compound only gets harder in the cold and traction is limited. Car is heavy and does well overall on the slippery stuff, but the traction is just bad and stopping distances are not great compared to normal cars with all season tires.

Now more Bolt- specific:

The headlights have such a shape, that snow will stick to them and progressively will render them useless in heavy snow conditions

The automatic emergency brake only makes things harder as it cannot be used to rotate the car while in motion if it is understeering.

What the fcuk is wrong with the windshield wipers when snowing? They will get out of sync and start hanging in the middle of the windshield. Also their resting spot in the valley under the windshield is badly designed as it accumulates snow which only amplifies the out of sync wiper scenario.

Traction controll "off" should mean just that- dont you be turning on despite being off...

And there folks you have it
I've don't get 5-6 in the summer, it's usually around 4. But for the below freezing days, it's more like 1.9 as reported on the dash or sometimes 2.1.
 

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As it seems to you. OK if not everyone agrees? Your opinions and results obviously vary, but can't agree with "Horrible, horrible, horrible"

And this is a surprise/disappointment how/why? If anyone could buy a BEV without understanding the range is significantly lower as the temperature gets lower? Isn't due diligence on the buyer?

FWIW, I've had every other shortcoming you mention on one or more ICE cars we've owned. There is no perfect car, especially at the deep discounts most here expect.

jack vines
Agreed. Although I've been driving EVs since 2012 so I was well aware of these shortcomings.

I get about 4 miles/kWh in the summer and about 1.5 in the winter for daily driving. I can get 2.5-3 on longer trips, where preheating the car takes a much smaller percentage of energy.

Before my first EV, I drove a Honda Insight. It got about 45MPG in the summer and closer to 25MPG in winter daily driving. Longer trips I could get back up to about 35MPG. So the EV is ultimately no different than the gas car.

The Bolt itself handles snow very well. The OEM tires are awful, but anyone who drives in snow regularly really should invest in snow tires. With a good set of tires, the Bolt is great in the snow!
 

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Normally I get 5-6 miles per kwh of electricity during the warmer weather. I get now 3 with heat running at 65 degrees...
This is exactly why I love the Bolt - it has enough range that I don't have to worry when cold weather reduces it down from it's normal 350-400km to 200-250km. The earlier generation of EVs that could only go 150-200km on a good day wouldn't have cut it for me.
 

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Entering my 2nd Minnesota winter in the Bolt. The lack of washer fluid sensor is annoying but minor. I actually like the extra weight for a small car. My efficiency drops from near 5 in the summer to 2.5-3 mi/kWh. It only dips below 2 mi/kWh if I’m driving less than a mile or two and get crazy heat to propulsion ratio. My biggest beef is that my 2017 has the single button for heat/AC vs two buttons in later years. If I heat the cabin and then turn the dial down, it will blow AC, which is not desirable.
 

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Here's the real world / reality of cold climate Bolt driving. The car was at 90% Monday morning, charged the night before and left the heated garage (38 degrees) without preconditioning. Drove to work and back home, temps were in the low 30's on Monday. I did not plug the car in Monday night, forgot to. Tuesday, today, the temps were in the teens. It was 15 degrees on the way to work, for the drive home it started at 14 degrees but dropped to 10 by the time I got home. Cabin heat was on Auto, set to 72 degrees on Monday, 73 today. The auto defrost features are disabled. Heated seat used, and the steering wheel used about half the time. Total trip distance over two days, 108 miles. I had a smidge of range anxiety btw. Just wanted to share how the northern climates operate, not complaining.

20191211_023826_resized.jpg 20191211_023846_resized.jpg
 

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Here's the real world / reality of cold climate Bolt driving. The car was at 90% Monday morning, charged the night before and left the heated garage (38 degrees) without preconditioning. Drove to work and back home, temps were in the low 30's on Monday. I did not plug the car in Monday night, forgot to. Tuesday, today, the temps were in the teens. It was 15 degrees on the way to work, for the drive home it started at 14 degrees but dropped to 10 by the time I got home. Cabin heat was on Auto, set to 72 degrees on Monday, 73 today. The auto defrost features are disabled. Heated seat used, and the steering wheel used about half the time. Total trip distance over two days, 108 miles. I had a smidge of range anxiety btw. Just wanted to share how the northern climates operate, not complaining.

View attachment 27861 View attachment 27860
Good information for those who are or will be going through their first winter in an EV. For those of us living in a cold climate who have been through at least one winter yeah, that's about the norm!
 

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@GetOffYourGas: I don't know if decent snow tires would help but my driveway is kinda steep in places. A little snow and my Bolt with their awful OEM's can't make it up. So it's parked for its first winter. :(

@TheCyberKnight: further to the above...now I'll give my driveway a go with it off. See what happens.

@BeThenPhotos: 7/8 of a jug!? I learned that there's no light too and so filled it up. It barely took a 1/4 or so. We're talking a gallon jug right? Yeah it's odd there's no light as my antique 2001 ICEV has a light. Oh well. Now I know. I'll just keep a jug on board.
 

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About the windshield wipers "getting out of sync and hanging in the middle of the windshield"... We don't live in the snow belt, so don't often need to deal with the frozen stuff. BUT, I have noticed a kinda weird thing with the wipers when I am cleaning my windshield. If I lift the wipers up off the glass I can very easily move them from the parked position to anywhere on the windshield. It is like the wiper arms are not rigidly connected to the drive shafts, but can rotate on the shaft with very little effort on my part. Is this some kind of "safety slip joint" to prevent stripping the motor drive gears if the wipers are hung up on snow or ice? Just seems unusual to me (compared to every other car I have owned).
 

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Concerning the wipers... if you've ever dabbled in robotics you will probably come to the conclusion that each wiper is independently operated by it's own servo motor vs the old standard single low speed continuous rotation motor that was linked to a common tie-bar bridging both wipers physically together. The thing is.. servo motors are notorious for getting out of sync because if one becomes impeded by some obstacle (snow in this case) the other blade would have to slow down or stop to stay in sync... which doesn't happen on the Bolt so the two wipers can get out of sync.
If you look at the parts diagram on gmpartsdirect.com you will indeed see that there is a right and left wiper motor for the bolt and both are direct connect to the wipers with no other linkages, eccentric cams, etc... so they are in essence independent servo's and will demonstrate all the failings of servo motors.
 
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