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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
She came home from a short trip (miles wise) and plugged it in to charge (110 volt). She came in telling me it wouldn't charge. A message on the IP stated the battery could not be charged at this time.

She was scared it was broke already.

I had some stuff to do outside so I headed out the door. Fed/treated the dogs and petted them some. Took a garbage can out to the road. Put some blankets in the truck (washed up after the last trip to the vet with a dog). Took some transmission lube to the shed to wait on the rest of the stuff to change the transmission lube in the Coupe.

Headed to the house and she had to be watching me out the window as she opens the back door and asks me what's wrong with the Bolt. Of course I tell her I've been too busy to even look but if she'd get me a key fob I'd take a look. She come to the door with a key fob and I go to the carport.

Yup, the green light is not blinking or on steady so not charged and not charging. I open the door and the message pops up in red letters telling me the battery can't be charged right now. Shows 190 miles left on the available charge in the battery.

I unplug the charger, plug it back in and get the same message (can't be charged right now.) I take a look at the 12 ga. wire extension cord the charger is plugged in to and sure enough, the plug isn't glowing red to let me know it has power. I walk to the back porch and she comes to the door again to ask me what's wrong. I tell her to just wait a minute, bend down, open the outlet cover door on the wall and see the red light on the GFCI outlet is on. Tripped. Why? No idea unless there was a power flutter yesterday during the big thunder storm. I press the reset button, the red light goes out, the car makes a beeping noise, I look at it and the green light is blinking. Okay, fixed it.

Then I called her outside to look at the outlet, explained it to her and she told me she'd already looked at it but she thought the red light meant it was working okay. Well, the outlet on the extension cord glows red when it's got power so I can excuse the misunderstanding. I show her the reset button, show here the green light on the Bolt is flashing and she gets that big smile on her face I love to see.

The Bolt is charging and she's happy. Problem solved.
 

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is the GFCI outlet also hooked up to other outlets. if there are other things on the circuit after the GFCI combined could trip the GFCI outlet.

if tripped are all other outlets in the vicinity still working?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
For some reason they wired the back porch GFCI outlet onto the same circuit as the downstairs bathroom GFCI outlet. I don't use the one in the bathroom. My wife uses it for charging the water flosser, hair dryer, electric toothbrush, etc. If there was anything wrong with those she failed to mention it this morning.
 

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Are you doing 8A or 12A charging on that outlet? And I thought there was something about using a gfci outlet with evse. Something about it already having built-in gfci.
 

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"I take a look at the 12 ga. wire extension cord the charger is plugged in to"
Not a good idea to use extension cord to charge the Bolt. Recommended to use a dedicated circuit without any extension.
 

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"I take a look at the 12 ga. wire extension cord the charger is plugged in to"
Not a good idea to use extension cord to charge the Bolt. Recommended to use a dedicated circuit without any extension.
This is recommended because the 110V charger has a temperature sensor IN the plug itself in case you have a cruddy outlet that overheats. It will trigger on overheating. When you plug it in to an extension cord, that protection only exists where you plug in to the extension cord, not at the power outlet at the wall. That's the reason.

That being said, everybody and their mother uses extension cords and I've yet to hear of an incident. Doesn't mean it didn't happen or that the thermal protection would have prevented it. It's a clever idea that I wish was in more places.

What I'd be more concerned about is the outside outlet on a circuit that also occasionally serves a hair dryer.

Anyways, the Original Poster would do well to really explore the idea of a 220V charger, even a little 16A would be better than the 110V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
8 amp charge rate.

We're retired. The car doesn't need to go down the road every day. It might go down the road two or three days in a row but that would be unusual. We drove it shopping and out to eat the other day, came home around 3 PM and put it on charge and the message on the IP was it would be charged by 0745 the next day.

I do plan to install a 230 volt circuit (got an empty/open breaking in the panel) but that is to make my wife feel better. She has a thing with worrying. It doesn't make her happy to worry, but she sure does a lot of it anyway.

The extension cord is 25 ft. The shortest one that would reach the carport and charger assembly that came with the car.

A lot of the trips in the car will be 20 miles or less.

We live in a sort of unique place. Woods/creek behind us. Horse pasture directly across the road, trees behind that, field/pond behind that. About 10 houses, or so, on the dead end road we live on. Five food stores within 3 miles of us. Two Lowes stores and two Home Depots with a less than 20 mile round trip (not that we'd use the Bolt for very many trips to either of those stores). It's just that we don't have a long trip to get to any place we really need to go and we don't need to go every day. The Bolt is perfect for our uses.

We picked it up on a Friday afternoon and drove it four days before we ever put it on charge. By then it told us it would take right at 2 days to charge up. And that was okay.
 

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For some reason they wired the back porch GFCI outlet onto the same circuit as the downstairs bathroom GFCI outlet.
Builders often pick one GFCI plug to "host" that function and then run multiple outlets off it "downstream" (because they're all protected by that outlet). It saves a few bucks. My parents' half-bath had the GFCI plug that also protected the garage wall outlets.

The original garage circuit in my house also protects the outlet on the back porch; I know this because my electric smoker sometimes trips it when I first turn it on.
 
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