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Discussion Starter #1
I do like that the car isn't over aggressively styled or over swoopy. Enough, but not too much.
I do like the seats, mine work well for my posterior. Great height adjustment range too.
I do like the long steering wheel extension range, most cars really suck here.
I do like the headroom. This with the seat jacked up gives a CUV type road view.
I do like the passenger room, you can have 6+ footers both front and rear.
I do like the regen brakes, smoother than friction and the way they function doesn't bug me.
I do like plugging in instead of gassing up. Not getting into the rest, its just more convenient.
I do like the lack of engine noise. I love a good motor growling, but for commuting.. no.
I do like that Chevy gave it more than 120hp 120 torks and let it eat! #1 of the big 4 that sold me.
I do like the 200 mile range. No anxiety. #2 Without this, I'm not here.
I do like the HOV lane access. #3
I do like the rebates. #4 Without it, I'm not here.

I don't like that the factory tires are LRR with low grip.
I don't like the jarring hit from pot holes. Could be a little softer riding.
I don't like how it resets from 12 to 8 amps every dang day.
I don't like how the power delivery is inconsistent. Even in sport mode. Which I am in 100%.
I don't like that the car weighs too much. Yeah I know but I don't have to like it.
I don't like that its shorter than some cars, I miss having a big trunk.
I don't like that its narrower than some cars, I miss that 3 wide space in the 2nd row.
I don't like what I have to pay extra montly for the wifi/onstar. But thats life.
 

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(...)I don't like how the power delivery is inconsistent. Even in sport mode. Which I am in 100%.(...)
I much prefer "normal" mode for smooth power delivery, the "sport" mode is over aggressive with the throttle response at the beginning of the engagement, making it hard to modulate.

I found that the Traction Control is really what makes the power delivery inconsistent, by limiting power when the wheels are not perfectly strait. If you want to drive a little more spiritedly, that's the button to press, not "sport" mode.

Also you only disabling "Traction Control" not "Stability Control", so if you go too crazy the system will still intervene to prevent you from going to much sideways.
 

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I too was very annoyed at the 12 amp back to 8, but then I found LocationBased item in the small little quick intro book. So no problem there now. A small issue is that the index in the main large manual seems somewhat poor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I much prefer "normal" mode for smooth power delivery, the "sport" mode is over aggressive with the throttle response at the beginning of the engagement, making it hard to modulate.

I found that the Traction Control is really what makes the power delivery inconsistent, by limiting power when the wheels are not perfectly strait. If you want to drive a little more spiritedly, that's the button to press, not "sport" mode.

Also you only disabling "Traction Control" not "Stability Control", so if you go too crazy the system will still intervene to prevent you from going to much sideways.
Thank you! Will try regular mode. Will try disabling TC.
 

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I don't like that the factory tires are LRR with low grip.
LRR is a good thing. But there are better compromises, trading off just slightly less efficiency for more grip and much lower noise. Given tires on the market today, I'll be replacing the factory tires with Continental TrueContacts when that day comes.

Across my electrified cars, I've had Bridgestone Ecopia, Goodyear Fuel Max, Michelin Premier, Michelin Energy Saver, and Continental TrueContact. The Conti's have been nearly as efficient yet offer much quieter ride and more grip.
 

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don't like that the factory tires are LRR with low grip.
Yes it became most apparent to me when putting the power down coming out of a corner. The unweighted drive wheel loses traction and spins. But that's not the way I routinely drive anyway.

My favourite maneuver is exiting a freeway onto an off ramp with a sharp bend in it. When the bend also has an elevation change it’s even more fun to gauge exactly when and how much regen to use so as not to require the brake pedal by the time one reaches the end of the off ramp. The tires seem fine for that.

Anyway, the only problem for me with the tires is keeping the pressures exactly where I want them. In the summer they seemed to lose air unpredictably and inexplicably. The problem doesn't seem as bad now as winter is setting in.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I get why LRR tires exist. I get that they may be the best choice for some buyers and their driving habits. They do alright for what they are I guess, but I'd prefer the range hit. Anyway its a quick fix, not a huge deal.

The flat floor is a great selling point. Most cars have a bump in the center (even FWD cars have it sometimes, mine did).

Back row leg room is luxury car good. The back row side to side shoulder room is unfortunately subcompact bad, as you guys probably well know. Works alright for 3 small kids but you don't want to have to stick 3 adults back there. 2 adults it works out good.
 

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The back row side to side shoulder room is unfortunately subcompact bad, as you guys probably well know. Works alright for 3 small kids but you don't want to have to stick 3 adults back there. 2 adults it works out good.

I compared the BMW i3 * rear seat width with that of the Bolt. I often have three adult females in back. While not great for a long (> 70 mile, or 1 hour) trip, the Bolt hip room is much more comfortable than the i3 was.

* Congrats BMW on selling the 100,000th i3 last month!
 

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I have swapped the LRR tire for some sticker tires with great performance benefits and a little range impact:
http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/12-wheels-tires-brakes-suspension/7922-recommendations-stickier-tires-2.html#post191266

I also went for the Riken Raptor ZR in OEM size. In San Diego we can run summer tires all year long. I have theses tires for roughly 1500 miles now.

They are definitely way stickier than the stock tires, a much more secure feel overall, no more wheel spin during acceleration or aggressive cornering. There is not a lot of feel difference at low speed, but the car really feel transformed when pushed a bit more and all the "wobbliness" is gone.

Now for the cons, there is an slight impact on the efficiency and range, I went from 4.1 to 3.7 Miles/kWh, during my normal commute, obviously efficiency drops even more during canyons and back road driving, as the car is now a real peach to enjoy dynamically.
That's about what the range show (210-220 miles) in the morning indeed.

The turn-in and initial bite is crispier, so you feel it in the steering, but there is no specific suspension feel difference with the new tires. The stock tires, unlike traditional run flat tires, do not have a stiff sidewall, so you will not get any confort improvement here. I found that inflating the tires to the recommended value as opposed to over-inflating to gain efficiency, goes a long way toward improving confort.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm getting used to the factory tires. As terrible as ever, but I don't mind them so much as before. On concrete I can modulate the throttle so they lightly squeak all the way from 0-25mph.. I am now using non-sport mode as suggested here for better modulation.

15's are probably ideal comfort and range wise. But you will not find a 15" performance tire in 25.5" diameter. 16" would be a good compromise, less inertia, more sidewall cushion, but still can get performance tires with the right diameter..
 
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