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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is too big and too long but, whatever. I have been following and occasionally commenting on folks with questions about adapters for charging. I thought I should share my collection. A disclaimer: this is what I have setup, what you choose to do is on you. Also, I use none of these on a regular basis, but set them up to give me options in the future. My standard home charging solution is a Clipper Creek LCS-20 hardwired in the garage. I picked it up Craigslist for $100 from a former Chevy Volt owner. I carry three EVSE onboard the Bolt, the stock portable 120 VAC unit, an equivalent 120 VAC Ford unit I go on CL for $75 that can be operated on 240 VAC but isn’t marked to do so, and a Clipper Creek HCS-40P 240 VAC 32 Amp unit I picked up on CL for something like $200. I know the stock EVSE can be run on 240, but I wanted to leave it as a backup only. As for adapters, I try to always insure they don’t mismatch voltages. If the source outlet is 240 the output connector is 240. The one exception I have is a BloomGrow 120 to 240 to adapter I bought on Amazon. This allows a NEMA 5-15 120 VAC 15 Amp plug to plug into a NEMA 6-15 240 VAC 15 Amp outlet. Amazon.com: BloomGrow 110V / 120V to 220V / 240V Plug Adapter for US (1 PC) : Patio, Lawn & Garden This is required to use any of the other 240 adapters I have. The rest of my adapters I put together from plugs and outlets I had left over from various projects, or that I picked up at one of our local Habitat Restore locations. None of these were put together based on actual need, just on available parts. They are:

  • NEMA TT30-P 120 VAC 30 Amp plug to NEMA 5-15 120 VAC 15 Amp outlet, this only provides up to 15 Amps, but allows use of 120 VAC 30 Amp RV outlets.
  • NEMA L5-30P 120 VAC 30 Amp twist lock generator outlet to NEMA TT30-R RV outlet. I am not sure I will ever need it, but I couldn’t walk past it on the shelf, so there it is.
  • NEMA 14-50P or 14-30P 240VAC 50 Amp plug to NEMA6-20R outlet. The only difference between the 14-50P and the 14-30P is the shape of the neutral prong, and since there is no need to connect to the neutral, simply leaving it off allows the plug to fit both outlets.
  • NEMA 10-30P 240 VAC 30 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This allows connection to 3 prong 30 Amp dryer outlets.
  • NEMA 6-30P 240 VAC 30 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This allows connection to 30 Amp welder outlets.
  • NEMA 10-20P 240 VAC 20 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This one I have some doubts about for two reasons. One, this is an ungrounded plug that connects to the neutral, and two, this is an almost obsolete connector so the odds of finding one of these outlets is slim. I am not sure an EVSE would accept the ground being connected to a neutral. I have less than $3 invested in it so what the heck, put it together.
All of this and a spare tire, jack, lug wrench, air compressor, a tool bag, and chock blocks fit neatly under the upper cargo floor in the Bolt.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@evtinker What's the details of that spare tire? Make, model, wheel?
I found it at Pick-n-Pull based on threads on this Forum. This one is a 215/60R16 on a steel rim from a Chevy Cruze. I didn't put the tire and rim combo together, it is just what was already on the car. I don't remember the year, maybe 2014? I have mounted it and checked clearances front and rear, no issues found. It is certainly slightly different in overall diameter from the stock tires, but this is a spare, not long term. It is almost certainly a better match than many common compact spares are to their respective cars. It doesn't need to be perfect. According to Tire Rack's chart it is about a 1/4" different in height and 5 revolutions per mile. Rather than a fancy tire cover it is in a garbage bag. Yes, I am cheap, why do you ask? The jack is from the same source, off an S-10 per a thread on this Forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You carry 3 EVSEs?
Yes, but if I could find an affordable adjustable one I could get away with two. (Belt and suspenders.) My long term plans are to full time in my RV and tow dolly the Bolt, so I will loose the home EVSE option. Either way, there is room so why not?
 

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I modified a Leaf EVSE to run 120v/240v and it has a NEMA 14-50p on it.

I don't have a NEMA 14-50r (receptacle) in this house yet (don't have an EV yet), but do have unused 14-30r outlets for a dryer and range. I purchased a 14-30p to 14-50r adaptor so I can plug my EVSE into the unused dryer outlet for when I have people over that own an EV.

Just got this yesterday

Amazon.com: ONETAK NEMA 14-30P to 14-50R 120V/240V 30 Amp 4 Prong Male Plug to 50 Amp 4 Prong Female Receptacle Generator Welder Welding Dryer PHEV EV Charger RV Power Cord Adapter Connector : Patio, Lawn & Garden



Since the EVSE I modified no longer has a standard plug on it, I had to buy a 5-15p to 14-50R adaptor. I got this yesterday also;

Amazon.com: CircleCord 50 Amp to 15 Amp 110V RV Adapter Cord, 5-15P Male to 14-50R Female Electrical Power Dogbone Plug, Heavy Duty STW 10 Gauge 12 Inch for RV Trailer Camper : Automotive

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As an aside, I've got a 2nd Leaf EVSE apart on my floor that I had picked up for $20. I need smaller ring terminals before I can complete the conversion to dual voltage.

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I have one of those Leaf charging cords that I sent to the guy in CA to be modified, it works on either 120 or 240 volts and is adjustable from low up to 20 amps. As part of the conversion, he installed a 3-prong twistlock plug on the cord and I bought pigtails for 120 volt and for the 15-40 plug. Since then, I built a couple of additional pigtails for the 15 amp 240 plug and for the 6-50 plug that my old buzz box welder had. I also built an extension cord with 3-wire SO cord and twistlock plug/receptacles on the ends. I think it's a L5-30. I don't think the guy does this conversion any more.

You adjust the current setting by shorting the 2 signal pins on the J1772 plug, then plugging in the power cord. Click the latch switch the number to correspond to the current setting you want, up to 20 amps. If you click it one more time, it starts over. It remembers the setting, and when you plug it in to power, the green light blinks to tell you the current setting. It's not entirely foolproof, but does work well.

I did this when I leased my 2013 Leaf, kept it when I leased my 2016 Leaf, then kept it when I turned the Leaf in, stuffing the Chevy cord into the Leaf's little storage bag. Of course, I kept it when I traded the '17 Bolt for the '20 Bolt that I have now.

The only time I charge away from home is when I visit my cousin, so I just leave the cord at his house, plugged into his welder receptacle.
 

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I thought the upgrade was way expensive back in the day, but I didn't realize you could also set the charge rate. Also didn't realize it allowed 20A compared to stock 12A. That might have been worth it to some people back in the day, but nowadays nobody wants an L2 that's so limited.

My upgrade might cost $15 in parts, with the main cost the NEMA 14-50p. Not too shabby getting a 240v EVSE for $35 total.

I'm sure I'll get something more capable in the future when I actually get an EV, but for now it's all my parents gen I Leaf needs. Winter range on that is about 30 miles, less if running the heat the whole time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Do the seats lay flat now?
Yes, no issue. The bag prevents drag on the seat. I did leave out the foam cover board between the carpet and the storage tray that holds the stock EVSE and air compressor. This allowed the spare to sit slightly lower. I also notched the bottom of the tray to clear the jack.
 

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I thought the upgrade was way expensive back in the day, but I didn't realize you could also set the charge rate. Also didn't realize it allowed 20A compared to stock 12A. That might have been worth it to some people back in the day, but nowadays nobody wants an L2 that's so limited.
Yeah, it was expensive, something like $250.00 total, including shipping, IIRC. Within a week or 2 after getting my Leaf, I had installed a Schnieder 6.6 Kw EVSE, so the stock outfit was just for backup. The Leaf's range was so short that I was limited to my home area; my Friday trips of 150 miles or perhaps more were 'out'. Now, with the Bolt, that's no problem except in the Winter. I've upgraded my home EVSE to a Clipper Creek HC-40, keeping the Schneider for a backup. The old [modified] Leaf charging cord is sufficient for my present needs; getting a couple of hours of charge with it assures me of getting home w/o sweating.

I have no idea what he did to make the cord programmable, but it works well and is less cumbersome than it sounds, certainly better than having to fool with DIP switches or somesuch. I keep the shorting wire with it to enable reprogramming if necessary.
 

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This is too big and too long but, whatever. I have been following and occasionally commenting on folks with questions about adapters for charging. I thought I should share my collection. A disclaimer: this is what I have setup, what you choose to do is on you. Also, I use none of these on a regular basis, but set them up to give me options in the future. My standard home charging solution is a Clipper Creek LCS-20 hardwired in the garage. I picked it up Craigslist for $100 from a former Chevy Volt owner. I carry three EVSE onboard the Bolt, the stock portable 120 VAC unit, an equivalent 120 VAC Ford unit I go on CL for $75 that can be operated on 240 VAC but isn’t marked to do so, and a Clipper Creek HCS-40P 240 VAC 32 Amp unit I picked up on CL for something like $200. I know the stock EVSE can be run on 240, but I wanted to leave it as a backup only. As for adapters, I try to always insure they don’t mismatch voltages. If the source outlet is 240 the output connector is 240. The one exception I have is a BloomGrow 120 to 240 to adapter I bought on Amazon. This allows a NEMA 5-15 120 VAC 15 Amp plug to plug into a NEMA 6-15 240 VAC 15 Amp outlet. Amazon.com: BloomGrow 110V / 120V to 220V / 240V Plug Adapter for US (1 PC) : Patio, Lawn & Garden This is required to use any of the other 240 adapters I have. The rest of my adapters I put together from plugs and outlets I had left over from various projects, or that I picked up at one of our local Habitat Restore locations. None of these were put together based on actual need, just on available parts. They are:

  • NEMA TT30-P 120 VAC 30 Amp plug to NEMA 5-15 120 VAC 15 Amp outlet, this only provides up to 15 Amps, but allows use of 120 VAC 30 Amp RV outlets.
  • NEMA L5-30P 120 VAC 30 Amp twist lock generator outlet to NEMA TT30-R RV outlet. I am not sure I will ever need it, but I couldn’t walk past it on the shelf, so there it is.
  • NEMA 14-50P or 14-30P 240VAC 50 Amp plug to NEMA6-20R outlet. The only difference between the 14-50P and the 14-30P is the shape of the neutral prong, and since there is no need to connect to the neutral, simply leaving it off allows the plug to fit both outlets.
  • NEMA 10-30P 240 VAC 30 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This allows connection to 3 prong 30 Amp dryer outlets.
  • NEMA 6-30P 240 VAC 30 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This allows connection to 30 Amp welder outlets.
  • NEMA 10-20P 240 VAC 20 Amp to NEMA 6-20R outlet. This one I have some doubts about for two reasons. One, this is an ungrounded plug that connects to the neutral, and two, this is an almost obsolete connector so the odds of finding one of these outlets is slim. I am not sure an EVSE would accept the ground being connected to a neutral. I have less than $3 invested in it so what the heck, put it together.
All of this and a spare tire, jack, lug wrench, air compressor, a tool bag, and chock blocks fit neatly under the upper cargo floor in the Bolt. View attachment 39853 View attachment 39855 View attachment 39856
Don't forget a tandem Square-D breaker wired to an inline receptacle (with an alligator clip for the ground) and then of course just straight alligator clips to an outlet, and while you're in there, may as well pick up a set of good insulated drivers and a meter, safety glasses and a set of gloves.
 

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I just carry the Tesla UMC (Universal Mobile Charger, the EVSE they supply with their cars) and a Tesla to J1772 adapter. I have 3 A/C cords for the Tesla UMC so I can charge at virtually any 120V or 240V A/C outlet, Tesla destination charger, or J1772 charger.

I use the OEM EVSE for charging at 240V / 12A in my garage.
 
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