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I just picked up a 2020 Premier a few weeks ago, installed a hitch (took about 2 hrs alone), bought an old Kamparoo trailer (it weighs 275 lbs dry), and now we're headed up the mountains camping this weekend. I also plan on strapping another 100-150 lbs of cargo on top of the trailer. I still need to figure out the wiring to get the lights working but the dirt road is close by my home so I'll figure that out later. It pulls great and the regen in "L" mode makes it feel like I've got trailer brakes.
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Yes you posted this on Reddit. I will say the same thing as I did over there.

Let us know the range hit.
 

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I would be careful with driving in L, unless you are very good with your foot and adjusting accordingly, but if you are using a full regen from L in frequent stop and go - it may actually warm up the motor a bit too much. Keep in mind you have extra few hundred pounds in the back that will push you.

I tow with Bolt quite often and L is used only if I need to slow down quicker that I would like to. Majority of the time I am in D and let it coast.
Same for downhill - unless it is very long and steep - it stays in D and coasting. Not even using CC to slow down or L, for that matter, unless - again - due to the hill being steep and long my speed becomes a problem.
 
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I would be careful with driving in L, unless you are very good with your foot and adjusting accordingly, but if you are using a full regen from L in frequent stop and go - it may actually warm up the motor a bit too much. Keep in mind you have extra few hundred pounds in the back that will push you.

I tow with Bolt quite often and L is used only if I need to slow down quicker that I would like to. Majority of the time I am in D and let it coast.
Same for downhill - unless it is very long and steep - it stays in D and coasting. Not even using CC to slow down or L, for that matter, unless - again - due to the hill being steep and long my speed becomes a problem.
Question: about the motor warming up a bit too much. How would the motor know the difference between hauling a 275lb trailer or having an extra 275lb passenger? I would think the motor would not know the difference.
 

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Question: about the motor warming up a bit too much. How would the motor know the difference between hauling a 275lb trailer or having an extra 275lb passenger? I would think the motor would not know the difference.
This is what I figure also. Just because it has its own wheels doesn't make it push on the motor any harder. And it's not like I'm racing the thing on a rally course, just a casual cruise to a campsite. If the motor can't handle that then this Bolt was was very poorly designed and engineered with absolutely 0 safety factor in mind.

I think I'm good.
 

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That is an interesting camper. What else is in it?
Basically nothing. Its a glorified canvas tent on wheels, hence the 275 lbs. Its fun tho and it gets me out camping!

Kamparoo makes some really nice ones now with a lot of features, but this one is very basic.
 

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That looks like a nice camper. Based on the low height when towing, and my year's experience towing a roughly 1000 lb boat & trailer (always in L mode, with no observed issue), I expect you will see very little range hit. More range hit based on speed than on trailer weight.

It look me about twice as long to get the lights working (using the great doc on this site) as it took to install the Draw-Tite hitch.
 

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Question: about the motor warming up a bit too much. How would the motor know the difference between hauling a 275lb trailer or having an extra 275lb passenger? I would think the motor would not know the difference.
I thought the same... but it would know because you would not only have the trailer, but the cargo and passengers in the car.
Unless you are going all alone and nothing else was in the car.
 

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Towing with a car is always a hot topic. Keywords like "insurance won't cover you, manufacture printed "no towing" in the owner's manual, dangering others and so on will popup.
Can the car tow? yes. Can it do it safely? yes. Common sense has to be used such as know you limits, keep extra follow distance, slow/brake sooner.
I am sure it was said thousands of times. It is not only about the engine or having enough power to pull, but handling! frame structure, being able to distribute the load, suspension wheelbase and trailer brakes all play a role. You should have no problem with a small trailer like yours. I also installed a hitch mainly to haul my mountain-bike, but occasionally will pull a small aluminum trailer with a dirtbike planted on it.
 

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Question: about the motor warming up a bit too much. How would the motor know the difference between hauling a 275lb trailer or having an extra 275lb passenger? I would think the motor would not know the difference.
The motor doesn't care. It would not be any different than having 4 people in the car and you are coasting downhill on a lengthy colorado mountainside. The motor will give all the regen it can. I am sure the car will protect itself and there is engineering built-in.
 

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Can we talk more about towing the camper? How was the trip? Did it jostle or wiggle? The suspension? What's the tongue weight? How was it over the bumps? Did your hitch drag anywhere?

Lights will be a pain in the ass, but doable. I did a rig for my 2017, there was a powered driver box and removal of body panels and peeling of wire harnesses, but in the end it was pretty slick. I only drove LED trailer lights. I'd resist any urge to splice the trailer cable directly in to the car. And don't skip the fuses.

I want that camper 😍

Have fun, and don't forget to put out your camp fire.
 

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I did a rig for my 2017, there was a powered driver box and removal of body panels and peeling of wire harnesses, but in the end it was pretty slick. I only drove LED trailer lights. I'd resist any urge to splice the trailer cable directly in to the car. And don't skip the fuses.
Apologies to the OP. At some point I plan to wire my car for a trailer as well. It wouldn't be my first time either. I have done everything from plug and play to soldiering wires. Is there a particular reason why this was difficult, and is there a reason why you wouldn't just splice into the appropriate wires?
 

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That's a really neat little camper, I like it! I'm more of a tent (or hammock when backpacking) camper myself. But I may end up investing in a small cargo trailer to help carry the stuff for a family of 5.
 

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Apologies to the OP. At some point I plan to wire my car for a trailer as well. It wouldn't be my first time either. I have done everything from plug and play to soldiering wires. Is there a particular reason why this was difficult, and is there a reason why you wouldn't just splice into the appropriate wires?
Happy to share why I have the opinion of "difficult"
The wires you need are in the drivers side trunk area, behind the left panel where the trunk lamp is. The lights you want are in the liftgate, so it's better to pick them up before they get up there. Getting that panel open is a chore and there are plenty of other parts that need to come away to really get in there, and some of it's just better to bend it away and work awkwardly rather than F with the airbags. I'm serious. The wires are also in that furry wire harness tape which is REALLY STICKY and peeling it is a lot of work, and you'll probably end up cutting it, so be careful. On top of it, there's not a lot of slack or room to work in there, and the bundles have plenty of different wires, and finding the green with the blue stripe or was it the...green with the purple stripe... then realizing you have the wrong bundle because the photo isn't exactly clear and the one you REALLY want is basically up against the rear seat and extra hard to reach. Cutting and soldering in these quarters is not recommended. The wires can't stand to lose any length, and they're pretty thin and require a bit of faith in those press-on splice gizmos. I was afraid that I was going to press them on and then..pop! the wire in the harness would get cut bu them, but it ended up being fine. I did have to solder in to some sort of control module back there to get the 12V, but it was just one wire. So, It's not a plug and play picnic or just going in and wire nutting in to the back of each tail light. In the end, the results were good. I used a Tekonsha 119148 Modulite Head Protector Trailer Light Power Module Kit from Amazon for $44.46 - I liked it because it was a buffer sort of thing, where it was powered off the 12V bus and the load on the existing light circuit was only enough to trip the logic in the module, so no freakishness on the part of bulb-out logic or risk of overload, and just to be safe, I fused the 12V input to something way way less than rated because I was only driving LEDs and I wanted to play it extra safe. After all, it's not mechanical flashers nowadays.

So I don't want to discourage you - If you're comfortable with it and don't mind being shoulder deep for a few hours, I'd say go for it. I'm going to have to do it on the next Bolt I get here, and I'm not looking forward to it, but the prior experience will speed things up a lot.

Good luck.
 

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Happy to share why I have the opinion of "difficult"
The wires you need are in the drivers side trunk area, behind the left panel where the trunk lamp is. The lights you want are in the liftgate, so it's better to pick them up before they get up there. Getting that panel open is a chore and there are plenty of other parts that need to come away to really get in there, and some of it's just better to bend it away and work awkwardly rather than F with the airbags. I'm serious. The wires are also in that furry wire harness tape which is REALLY STICKY and peeling it is a lot of work, and you'll probably end up cutting it, so be careful. On top of it, there's not a lot of slack or room to work in there, and the bundles have plenty of different wires, and finding the green with the blue stripe or was it the...green with the purple stripe... then realizing you have the wrong bundle because the photo isn't exactly clear and the one you REALLY want is basically up against the rear seat and extra hard to reach. Cutting and soldering in these quarters is not recommended. The wires can't stand to lose any length, and they're pretty thin and require a bit of faith in those press-on splice gizmos. I was afraid that I was going to press them on and then..pop! the wire in the harness would get cut bu them, but it ended up being fine. I did have to solder in to some sort of control module back there to get the 12V, but it was just one wire. So, It's not a plug and play picnic or just going in and wire nutting in to the back of each tail light. In the end, the results were good. I used a Tekonsha 119148 Modulite Head Protector Trailer Light Power Module Kit from Amazon for $44.46 - I liked it because it was a buffer sort of thing, where it was powered off the 12V bus and the load on the existing light circuit was only enough to trip the logic in the module, so no freakishness on the part of bulb-out logic or risk of overload, and just to be safe, I fused the 12V input to something way way less than rated because I was only driving LEDs and I wanted to play it extra safe. After all, it's not mechanical flashers nowadays.

So I don't want to discourage you - If you're comfortable with it and don't mind being shoulder deep for a few hours, I'd say go for it. I'm going to have to do it on the next Bolt I get here, and I'm not looking forward to it, but the prior experience will speed things up a lot.

Good luck.
Thanks for taking the time to explain the issues on doing the wiring there. It does sound like a chore; since it is a somewhat difficult job, I will likely wait until I have the time and energy to deal with it. Too bad there is no plug and play stuff. I wonder if any other plug and play kits for other GM models will work? I could see GM just reaching into their parts bins and using another existing model's plugs instead of making Bolt specific plugs.
 

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The trailer has a flat 4 plug. I ran a matching flat 4 through one of the plastic plugs under the sub woofer then used just the first two wires to splice to a flat 2 connecter. I then connected a matching flat 2 connecter to a 12 v accessory plug with a 6 foot lead that I plug into the 12 v outlet on the console.
The result is I can power the LED trailer running lights when I flip the switch at the accessory plug. I don’t have brake or turn signals. I didn’t want to get into splicing into the Bolt‘s wiring. With a low trailer, the Bolt‘s tail lights are visible so this workaround is OK for my needs.
I have been happy with this solution.
 

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I would be careful with driving in L, unless you are very good with your foot and adjusting accordingly, but if you are using a full regen from L in frequent stop and go - it may actually warm up the motor a bit too much. Keep in mind you have extra few hundred pounds in the back that will push you.

I tow with Bolt quite often and L is used only if I need to slow down quicker that I would like to. Majority of the time I am in D and let it coast.
Same for downhill - unless it is very long and steep - it stays in D and coasting. Not even using CC to slow down or L, for that matter, unless - again - due to the hill being steep and long my speed becomes a problem.
I've had no issues whatsoever driving with a 2000 lbs trailer at highway speeds (70-75 mph) using L on the longest downgrade off ramp in my area. I've seen 70 kW regen for ~20 seconds tops. I don't live in a mountainous area, but I think a lot of people are overly cautious about a vehicle they don't understand well. If the battery or motor get too hot, the Bolt will reduce the amount of regen and power available to keep within safe limits. I've personally never even observed this happening, but most of my towing has been on cooler days, and limited to under 50 miles or so, so less of a potential for overheating.

The only real concern is to just leave more space between you and the vehicle in front of you. It does take quite a bit more distance to come to a complete stop with the brakes in a panic situation. No different than a gas vehicle.
 

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As someone mentioned it in an earlier thread, the lithium battery likes to live in the same environment as humans. So if it feels like getting hot, it will turn on the A/C for sure I have experienced this here in Texas often. Not sure if the motor shares the same cooling loop, but it reduction gear and the motor bearings have a pump that spays trans fluid/oil on them. One thing for sure, as technology advances the car will protect itself against elements and human behavior; The bolt does.
 
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