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2017 Bolt Premier
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24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2017 probably has the original battery in it. What is the procedure to hook it up to a trickler?
Also what is procedure to remove or replace it?
 

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2021 Bolt Premier
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3,144 Posts
I just hook up the maintainer the same way I would with any other 12V vehicle. There's a convenient negative/grounding stud sticking up near the middle of the "engine" bay. Hook positive to the battery. Just be sure the charger/maintainer is a "smart" one, made specifically for 12V PbA AGM batteries. A cheap-o one can cook the battery.

To replace the battery, you'll want to open the hood and wait about ten minutes for the car to go back to sleep without a fob near. Do nothing to wake up the car, then disconnect the negative terminal first. Disconnect positive and take it to your local auto parts store and exchange it for another one of the same type. I go for the best-rated 12V PbA AGM battery that will fit in the spot.

For long term-storage at home, disconnect the battery ground and hook up the maintainer to the battery terminals themselves.
 

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2017 Bolt Premier
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much! Ok shopping for a smart charger today.

How do I know the car is completely asleep? Isn't the radio always on? Under settings it says 2%
Also what happens when or if I ever run it dead? Do I just have it towed to a charger? Im not going to do this but I think it would be important to know and if someone towing would know how to properly transport am electric vehicle if it's different.
So I ran it down to 8 miles today. I didn't have to work so I thought I'd see what I could get it down to.
It sat on 30 miles for a few days so I took it out on the highway and turned the heater, steering wheel, and seat on, at 14 miles a propulsion warning came on.... shortly after the min/max figures went blank. I went to the battery screen and the last bar was blinking. I came back into town and put it in l mode. It seems to basically from there on, just generate power in my small town driving. It's on my 32a charger so I'm also seeing how long it takes.
 

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Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
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3,144 Posts
Thank you so much! Ok shopping for a smart charger today.

How do I know the car is completely asleep? Isn't the radio always on? Under settings it says 2%
Also what happens when or if I ever run it dead? Do I just have it towed to a charger? Im not going to do this but I think it would be important to know and if someone towing would know how to properly transport am electric vehicle if it's different.
So I ran it down to 8 miles today. I didn't have to work so I thought I'd see what I could get it down to.
It sat on 30 miles for a few days so I took it out on the highway and turned the heater, steering wheel, and seat on, at 14 miles a propulsion warning came on.... shortly after the min/max figures went blank. I went to the battery screen and the last bar was blinking. I came back into town and put it in l mode. It seems to basically from there on, just generate power in my small town driving. It's on my 32a charger so I'm also seeing how long it takes.
If the ignition is off, the car will go to sleep after a while if there isn't anything done to wake it up, like open or close a door or the hood.

I carry a lithium battery jump pack in case the 12V aux battery goes nearly flat when I'm out and about. I've never used it, though. If a cell is shorted in the 12V aux battery, a jumper pack may not be adequate. You don't need much current to get the vehicle started, because unlike an ICE, you're not turning over a high power starter motor. You're just providing enough power to wake up some electronics. Once the vehicle is "on", the DC-DC converter should charge up the 12V aux battery from the traction pack, unless it's a faulty DC-DC that caused the dead 12V in the first place.

I question the health of any 12V PbA battery that has been allowed to go flat, and been re-charged. It's health will probably suffer from then on. Some batteries are better at deep discharge than others (like trolling motor batteries), and I've always replaced the OEM batteries with deep-discharge AGM types in my EVs for the last 20 years, and top them up around once a month with a maintainer. I've never been stranded.
 
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