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I know you've ruled out the Model Y, but the "strategy game" as you call it for long distance EV travel virtually disappears with any Tesla. And, unfortunately for mass EV adoption, it seems that Tesla is the only EV manufacturer that has understood this issue from Day 1.

Almost three years ago when I first started logging into this forum, the great white hope was that charging infrastructure for CCS Combo vehicles would soon catch up with, and even surpass, what Tesla offers. Well soon has come and gone and despite signs of life from EA and a few others, we are still looking at a really substandard long distance charging experience compared to that offered by Tesla.

I really hope that we are still not having conversations in two or three more years about substandard DCFC charging experiences because such continued inadequacy will be the ultimate bottleneck for the average driver considering an EV rather than an ICE. And that doesn't even address the issue of the number of charging stalls being installed at any given location. If you think Thanksgiving week at San Luis Obispo or Kettleman City looks bad for Teslas, just imagine even 25% as many non-Tesla EVs trying to get home on a holiday weekend.
Yes, I remember those claims as well. I think there was a flawed logic to begin with and that was that Tesla was demand constrained as "proven" by the release of the MR Model 3. Running with that falsehood, theorized that the Supercharger Network was now dead in it's tracks. Without continued sales, there would be no funding for a continued build out. It would be difficult to imagine how much further behind the public DCFC network would be if not for Volkswagen getting caught in the Dieselgate scandal.

Fast forward to now. We obviously know that Tesla never was nor will likely be demand constrained for quite some time. They are a money printing machine at this point so the aggressive build-out of the Supercharger Network never actually shut down so that the public network could catch up. With the continued popularity of Tesla's vehicles and especially the Model Y, that build out will go to hyperspeed now. It has to or west coast Tesla owners will feel the crunch.
So I think part of the reason that the public infrastructure didn't catch up is that the Supercharger Network isn't static as assumed.

At some point, the EA build out will stop. After that, it will be either capitalism or government subsidies that will keep the public network growing. We already see a significant cooperation at the state level (Florida, New York) that will bring the public network to a viable infrastructure. It's getting close now in quantity and locations, just not reliability. Until they can match the convenience and dependability of the Supercharger Network, regardless of the number of portals, it will always seem inferior.

Elon posted a tweet the other day reiterating Tesla's mission to advance the adoption of sustainable transportation.


"Tesla is open to licensing software and supplying powertrains & batteries. We’re just trying to accelerate sustainable energy, not crush competitors! "

Further down in the replies, Robert Bollinger again reached out to Elon via twitter to ask if Bollinger can use the Supercharger network.
For the life of me, I can't fathom why Bollinger doesn't just contact Tesla directly rather than use twitter which I doubt Elon reads every single response.

Regardless, it would seem to be in the BEV communities best interest to ensure the supercharger bottlenecks are addressed before opening it up to non-Tesla's but the numbers would seem to make that concern moot. The total number of non-Tesla's that would be using the Supercharger Network is about 6 months worth of Tesla's production (WAG). IMO, it would be a negligible impact to the queue's especially if they meet the minimum charging speed threshold originally spelled out. I don't know what that is but would guess it to be 100kW, so the number of non-Tesla's that meet the minimum charging speed is even less.

I believe Rivian is planning on building their own charging network but mostly to address off roading limitations. There was another company too that recently announced their own proprietary network but I'll have to try and find it (not Ford glomming onto the existing one). I imagine that may have more to do with the dysfunctional aspects that are becoming the achilles heel of the public network and that is countless different software's from a variety of manufacturers and vendors, trying to communicate with a handful of charging hardware and software. That along with the payment fiasco has really stalled the adoption IMO.
I don't see an easy or timely solution that addresses that shortcoming that will always be looked upon as a deficiency when compared to proprietary charging networks, regardless of whether they are considered a standard or not. That argument is laughable if 80% of the vehicles on the road use the non-standard protocol that is objectively superior.
 

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Dyefrog I believe your objective overview of the current state of EV charging infrastructure is correct. While I am confident that, some time in the future, the non-Tesla world will basically come to emulate the simplicity and ubiquity of that company's fast-charge system, it may be a while.

Rich
 

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Where are they opening a new SC?
If they told you you could get delivery to your nearest SC, they lied. You can only take delivery of a Tesla in Mt Kisco, Brooklyn, or (I think) somewhere out on Long Island. You CANNOT take delivery of a Tesla in Henrietta/Rochester or Latham/Albany (which is why I now own a Bolt because Tesla promised "nearest service center" of Henrietta and then shafted me over to Mt Kisco, forcing me to cancel my order and file a credit card dispute over their bait-and-switch.
The new location is Smithtown Long Island at the intersection of rt 347 and rt 25. It is going to be a combination location as a Service/Delivery Center and new Store location. They are taking the business license from Mt. Kisco location in order to be able to use the new location as a delivery center. All this has been confirmed by Tesla personell at the only present Long Island Tesla Service Center/Delivery Center in Manhassett Long Island. It is a huge location, at one point they had over 400 Tesla's park there for delivery (I have pictures of that). I drive past it frequently since it's so close to my house... the Tesla sign is up, the building painted, the scaffolding is gone, the parking lot is paved, etc.. it is scheduled for staffing this week and opening in mid August.
 

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I know you've ruled out the Model Y, but the "strategy game" as you call it for long distance EV travel virtually disappears with any Tesla. And, unfortunately for mass EV adoption, it seems that Tesla is the only EV manufacturer that has understood this issue from Day 1.

Almost three years ago when I first started logging into this forum, the great white hope was that charging infrastructure for CCS Combo vehicles would soon catch up with, and even surpass, what Tesla offers. Well soon has come and gone and despite signs of life from EA and a few others, we are still looking at a really substandard long distance charging experience compared to that offered by Tesla.

I really hope that we are still not having conversations in two or three more years about substandard DCFC charging experiences because such continued inadequacy will be the ultimate bottleneck for the average driver considering an EV rather than an ICE. And that doesn't even address the issue of the number of charging stalls being installed at any given location. If you think Thanksgiving week at San Luis Obispo or Kettleman City looks bad for Teslas, just imagine even 25% as many non-Tesla EVs trying to get home on a holiday weekend.
Even Tesla didn't get it on "Day 1." Initially, they copied what GM did with Magne Charge for the EV1. They realized a few years later, however, that that wasn't going to be good enough, so that's when they started working on the Supercharger Network.

Yes, three years ago, there was talk about the public charging infrastructure catching up to the Supercharger Network in terms of coverage and speed. That has mostly happened. The coverage from Electrify America alone is about where the Supercharger Network in the United States was in 2017, and Electrify America's network provides faster charging speeds than the Supercharger Network. Now, to be fair to the Supercharger Network, it is a moving target, so while the public charging network doesn't look anything like it looked 3 years ago, neither does the Supercharger Network. That does not, however, mean that the public charging infrastructure is woefully inadequate in the same way as it was 3 years ago. Basically, 3 years ago, the Supercharger Network had an insurmountable lead over the public charging infrastructure. Now, though? It's just a bit ahead.

As for the "strategy game," frankly, there isn't one. It's simply knowledge. I don't plan my trips anymore. I'm not special. I just have more working knowledge of the public charging infrastructure than most other EV owners. Strategies only really come into play for particular cars, and even that could be categorized as knowledge and understanding of your particular vehicle. For instance, a Tesla Model 3 owner might want to drive until they're down to 5%, charge for 15 minutes, rinse and repeat. While a Bolt EV owner might want to drive until 10% battery and charge to 65% to cool the battery and limit the number of stops they make. An Audi e-Tron owner might want to drive however and charge to 80-85% each stop.

In terms of traveling "strategy," though, it's simply a matter of knowing where you want to go, what your range will be while traveling, and where and how long you need to recharge along the way. The only significant advantage Tesla has in that regard is that they've integrated that route planner into the vehicle, and it's designed to work with their private, proprietary charging network. That integrated functionality is coming to other vehicles soon, but you could argue that functionality is already there for those of us who know how to use the tools at our disposal.

And as for the FUD about traveling on holidays being as bad as what Tesla owners have to deal with, it's not even going to be close. The only way it would be is if Tesla releases a CCS adapter, and the overflow from crowded Superchargers also backlogs the public charging sites.

Looking at the Highway 101 route connecting the Bay Area to Los Angeles (still a bit of a sore point because we lost all those potential Recargo sites), between Salinas and Santa Barbara, there are currently 58 Supercharger stalls broken up over eight sites with four more sites on the way (two of them in Santa Barbara). By contrast, the public charging infrastructure has 38 chargers broken up over 18 sites (six of these chargers at two sites are only waiting for the public utility). The additional distribution of public chargers helps to offsets backlogs, but just the raw charger count indicates that the non-Tesla EV population would need to be closer to 50% of the current Tesla population in that region before there's an issue. And this is only a 230-mile section of road between two major city centers when many upcoming EVs will be able to drive directly from Los Angeles to San Francisco on a single charge with no stops. Essentially, by the time the EV population could potentially overwhelm the charging infrastructure, ranges will have increased to the point that 90% of EV owners will never need to use charging infrastructure away from home or work.
 

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The new location is Smithtown Long Island at the intersection of rt 347 and rt 25. It is going to be a combination location as a Service/Delivery Center and new Store location. They are taking the business license from Mt. Kisco location in order to be able to use the new location as a delivery center. All this has been confirmed by Tesla personell at the only present Long Island Tesla Service Center/Delivery Center in Manhassett Long Island. It is a huge location, at one point they had over 400 Tesla's park there for delivery (I have pictures of that). I drive past it frequently since it's so close to my house... the Tesla sign is up, the building painted, the scaffolding is gone, the parking lot is paved, etc.. it is scheduled for staffing this week and opening in mid August.
Do you know where the closest delivery center would be for upstate New Yorkers? Asking for a friend.
 

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Do you know where the closest delivery center would be for upstate New Yorkers? Asking for a friend.
Since they are only allowed 5 locations in NY with Brooklyn and two Long Island locations taken that only leaves Henrietta/Rochester NY and Latham NY for Upstate customers.
That's my best guess anyway.
 

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Are you sure? I still haven't got a straight answer about the Bolt despite many requests for an answer. People say that D mode in the Bolt applies friction braking immediately, but then others say it only engages after regen has been tapped out. This question is the biggest mystery surrounding all EVs.
I can't claim to have attached diagnostic equipment to my Bolt or studied the engineering and design diagrams, but I ran a test where I drove the Bolt down a long steep hill in "L", "D" and "N" modes. "L" and "D" behaved identically - they both showed the same kW of regen on the driver information console and the brake calipers were at ambient temperature as measured with an IR thermometer at the bottom of the hill. That's in spite of me having to use a fair bit of brake pedal force to maintain speed on the way down. "N" mode of course showed no regen and the brake calipers showed very noticeable heat buildup.

So there's no doubt in my mind that "D" mode uses regen alone for mild to moderate braking. Where exactly it kicks in I couldn't tell you, but it's beyond the kinds of braking forces that I use in normal driving, so for me at least it's a moot point.
 

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Further down in the replies, Robert Bollinger again reached out to Elon via twitter to ask if Bollinger can use the Supercharger network.
For the life of me, I can't fathom why Bollinger doesn't just contact Tesla directly rather than use twitter...
I can think of one obvious reason - Bollinger doesn't think that Elon will allow third-party access to the Supercharging network and he's publicly calling Elon out on it. That may or may not be true, but if Elon doesn't respond then it's the inference that I'd take away from it.
 

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...Yes, three years ago, there was talk about the public charging infrastructure catching up to the Supercharger Network in terms of coverage and speed. That has mostly happened. The coverage from Electrify America alone is about where the Supercharger Network in the United States was in 2017, and Electrify America's network provides faster charging speeds than the Supercharger Network. Now, to be fair to the Supercharger Network, it is a moving target, so while the public charging network doesn't look anything like it looked 3 years ago, neither does the Supercharger Network. That does not, however, mean that the public charging infrastructure is woefully inadequate in the same way as it was 3 years ago. Basically, 3 years ago, the Supercharger Network had an insurmountable lead over the public charging infrastructure. Now, though? It's just a bit ahead...
I still read about problems from EA and EVGo users having to move from one charging stall to another to another just to find one that will communicate with their car/credit card. How often is the average car owner going to put up with that before the word-of-mouth undoes the reliability of the next ten charging locations that work as designed. (Marketing people have long identified the fact that one bad review undoes the hard work done to acquire 10 loyal customers.)

...As for the "strategy game," frankly, there isn't one. It's simply knowledge. I don't plan my trips anymore. I'm not special. I just have more working knowledge of the public charging infrastructure than most other EV owners...
Requiring a better working knowledge of public charging infrastructure than most other EV owners actually makes you special.

...In terms of traveling "strategy," though, it's simply a matter of knowing where you want to go, what your range will be while traveling, and where and how long you need to recharge along the way. The only significant advantage Tesla has in that regard is that they've integrated that route planner into the vehicle, and it's designed to work with their private, proprietary charging network. That integrated functionality is coming to other vehicles soon...
There's that "soon" promise rearing its teasing head once more.

...Essentially, by the time the EV population could potentially overwhelm the charging infrastructure, ranges will have increased to the point that 90% of EV owners will never need to use charging infrastructure away from home or work...
It would be really nice if your aspiration for EVs becomes reality. Contrast that with the fact that over the six year life of the Chevy Volt, GM managed to increase the EV-only range from 45 to 55 miles. In the first four years of the Chevy Bolt the range has increased a whopping 27 miles. The Audi e-Tron has 50% more battery pack than the Bolt and gets 50 miles less.

A pessimist is defined as a well-informed optimist.
 

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.... Regen breaking and 1 petal driving are separate functions. The aggressiveness of regen is also selectable.
If you select the 'Low Regen' in a Tesla, you get somewhat of a 'coast' when you remove your foot from the Go Pedal, correct?
Then to slow your speed further requires the use of Friction Brakes, correct?

1 Pedal to me means you are controlling your accel and decel forces with your foot, working that Go Pedal the entire time.
1 Pedal means you get NO COAST function.
If you want to gradually slow down,, you have to work at achieving that by 'feathering' your right foot on the Go Pedal.

Other EV's you can drive Normal Style.
Taking your foot off the Go Pedal to 'adjust' ;) , or if you want to let the car slow down at its own rate, you can do that.
( I realize the 'coast' is producing some regen to make the car feel like a normal ICE. Shifting to N is real coasting.)
Then when if you want further decel you use the Brake Pedal to apply Variable Regen, with no Friction Brakes until max regen is used.

NONE
of that is available in a Tesla.

Tesla's force you to choose between two modes of regen, one requires your foot on the Go Pedal the whole time, and the Brake Pedal is strictly old-school Friction Brakes.

Creep and coming to a complete stop are not what I am talking about here.
 

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Since they are only allowed 5 locations in NY with Brooklyn and two Long Island locations taken that only leaves Henrietta/Rochester NY and Latham NY for Upstate customers.
That's my best guess anyway.
Thanks, I'm only 10 minutes from the Latham one and was just there a month ago getting the HW3 upgrade and it's only a Service Center. I had written to Tesla suggesting Saratoga Springs would be an ideal location due to demographics and location. They already have a destination charger at the Auto Museum near the Hall of Springs which they used to use when they had demo days. The last legislative session seemed to really push back on allowing more than 5 Sales Centers so I'm not holding out much hope for more but if there's a new opportunity, I hope they consider the Capitol Region.
Based on the latest map, there are 4 downstate and 1 in Rochester. They still show Mt. Kisco as a Sales Center but I know the map lags based on what Supercharge.info has. The one in White Plains is only about 20 minutes further I suppose. Paramus is also a possibility. Montreal probably not an option due to regulatory issues and such. By the time the Cybertruck comes out, maybe it will deliver itself
30083
 

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If you select the 'Low Regen' in a Tesla, you get somewhat of a 'coast' when you remove your foot from the Go Pedal, correct?
Then to slow your speed further requires the use of Friction Brakes, correct?

1 Pedal to me means you are controlling your accel and decel forces with your foot, working that Go Pedal the entire time.
1 Pedal means you get NO COAST function.
If you want to gradually slow down,, you have to work at achieving that by 'feathering' your right foot on the Go Pedal.

Other EV's you can drive Normal Style.
Taking your foot off the Go Pedal to 'adjust' ;) , or if you want to let the car slow down at its own rate, you can do that.
( I realize the 'coast' is producing some regen to make the car feel like a normal ICE. Shifting to N is real coasting.)
Then when if you want further decel you use the Brake Pedal to apply Variable Regen, with no Friction Brakes until max regen is used.

NONE
of that is available in a Tesla.

Tesla's force you to choose between two modes of regen, one requires your foot on the Go Pedal the whole time, and the Brake Pedal is strictly old-school Friction Brakes.

Creep and coming to a complete stop are not what I am talking about here.
I assume your handle is the bike. That was on my short list as a "yute". Helped my best friend growing up wrench in a Triumph shop back in the 70's.
Anyway, your not getting any pushback on whether a Tesla uses mechanical brakes when braking. Pushing on the brake pedal has absolutely no impact on regen other than reduce the kinetic energy that regen only would have recaptured. So your bolded sentence above is correct. You cannot vary regen on a Tesla using the brake pedal. That's never been disputed.
Where the disagreement stems from is this statement you made originally.

"'Standard' regen requires '1 Pedal' driving, correct? Foot off that Go Pedal = lots of regen and Brake lights. "

If you choose Low Regen, you will coast more than Standard Regen, that much you have right. Either one can slow you to within about 5 mph using regen only. Low will need more space but in time you adjust your driving to your liking. If you are accustomed to go from accelerator to brake with no in between, Low Regen is the ticket. But it still gives back some regen. You can still drive it without using the brake up to the last 5 mph. And if you want the car to do the mechanical braking for you within that last 5 mph, it can if you select "Hold" in the stopping mode menu. You can drive and never touch the brake if you want in either Low or Standard Regen.

1 Pedal in a Tesla does just what you think it does regarding controlling the car with just the accelerator. Just like it does in the Bolt, or the Leaf. Feathering the accelerator is how most people drive Bolts, Leafs and Tesla's with 1 Pedal enabled. I can't tell if you don't like that aspect since your comment, If you want to gradually slow down, you have to work at achieving that by 'feathering' your right foot on the Go Pedal. makes it sound like a burden. It's no more a burden in a Tesla than it is in a Bolt.

I'm not sure if the point your trying to make is focusing on the paddles in the Bolt allowing on the fly adjustments to regen that can avoid using the brakes if you've miscalculated your stopping distance or a sudden change in plans. If it is, then as mentioned earlier, the Bolt differs from the Tesla in that regard. You cannot add braking to a Tesla beyond what the regen can deliver unless you press the mechanical brake. If that's the point you're now trying to make, you win.

My Leaf also had the "paddle" regen ability and I did use it from time to time and it's better to have it than not but I certainly didn't consider it a bragging point. I think too that the Tesla being RWD, may not need to adjust regen on the fly like a FWD car might. I know that I've never had any handling or traction issues in snow or ice with regen on standard but it may be modulated by computer and I'm just not aware.

Tesla forces you to choose between two modes of regen, Low or Standard. Neither requires your foot on the accelerator the whole time and yes, the brake is strictly friction brakes.
Tesla also "forces" you to choose one of 3 types of stopping modes. Creep, Roll, Hold.
Standard regen can be enabled without 1 pedal driving.
 

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I can think of one obvious reason - Bollinger doesn't think that Elon will allow third-party access to the Supercharging network and he's publicly calling Elon out on it. That may or may not be true, but if Elon doesn't respond then it's the inference that I'd take away from it.
Yup. I spoke with Robert Bollinger at the LA Autoshow. They settled on the CCS standard because Tesla shunned them when they asked about being able to use Tesla's charging standard and access the Supercharger Network.
 

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I still read about problems from EA and EVGo users having to move from one charging stall to another to another just to find one that will communicate with their car/credit card. How often is the average car owner going to put up with that before the word-of-mouth undoes the reliability of the next ten charging locations that work as designed. (Marketing people have long identified the fact that one bad review undoes the hard work done to acquire 10 loyal customers.)
This is moving the goal posts a bit. I still read stories almost daily of Tesla owners who are struggling to get Superchargers working properly or are surprised at not getting the charging rates they are supposed to, and that's with a private, proprietary, integrated system. Yes, the public chargers need to improve their reliability, but that, too, is a moving target. EVgo's reliability is far better than it was in 2016 when I first ordered my Bolt EV. Electrify America's reliability has improved significantly since adopting their app. There's no reason to assume that reliability won't improve over time.

Requiring a better working knowledge of public charging infrastructure than most other EV owners actually makes you special.
I disagree. Experience is in no way "special." It's simply a choice whether to be informed or not.

There's that "soon" promise rearing its teasing head once more.
Perhaps, though really I was simply giving Tesla that benefit. As I stated, that functionality already exists for a number of us who know how to access and use it. The "soon" really applies to having it built-in on the car rather than only being able to access it when an external device is plugged in. Technically, vehicles like the Porsche Taycan, Volvo Polestar 2, etc. already have these features integrated, and more cars with similar features are on the way.

It would be really nice if your aspiration for EVs becomes reality. Contrast that with the fact that over the six year life of the Chevy Volt, GM managed to increase the EV-only range from 45 to 55 miles. In the first four years of the Chevy Bolt the range has increased a whopping 27 miles. The Audi e-Tron has 50% more battery pack than the Bolt and gets 50 miles less.

A pessimist is defined as a well-informed optimist.
In terms of automotive advancements, they grow in leaps, not steps. So sure, the interval might be longer than you (or even I) would prefer, but the advancements are significant nonetheless. Rather than cherry picking a PHEV, where battery electric range is far less crucial, you could instead focus on an apples-to-apples comparison. Instead, we could look at the Spark EV first released in 2013 with an EPA range of 82 miles was replaced by the larger Bolt EV four years later with an EPA range of 238 miles (a three-fold increase). While I don't expect the EVs GM releases four years after the Bolt EV was released to see another three-fold increase in range, I do expect them to be even larger (appealing to more consumers) with even more range.

You can look beyond GM for that as well. Hyundai and KIA went from having ~100 mile Ioniq Electric and Soul EVs to having >200 mile Kona Electric and Niro EVs in a single generation. Mercedes went from having a ~90 mile b250e to a 200+ mile EQC to announcing a 400+ mile EQS.

I prefer objective facts and reality to either optimism or pessimism.
 

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..... Feathering the accelerator is how most people drive Bolts, Leafs and Tesla's with 1 Pedal enabled.

I can't tell if you don't like that aspect since your comment, If you want to gradually slow down, you have to work at achieving that by 'feathering' your right foot on the Go Pedal. makes it sound like a burden. It's no more a burden in a Tesla than it is in a Bolt.

Standard regen can be enabled without 1 pedal driving.
OK, you win at word count.
But are you saying most EV drivers use the 1 Pedal Style of driving? It's not clear...

Yes, I am saying it's a burden. It's more work load for the driver. You never get to take your right foot off the Go Pedal to coast and relax.

Yes, 'Standard regen' in a Tesla means using the Friction Brakes and not getting much regen during a 'slow down to stop'.

The moral of this long saga is:
Blended Brakes is a high-tech feature that Tesla's don't have.
Anyone can drive an EV Normal Style with Blended Brakes and not use the Friction Brakes for the most part.
Tesla's force you to adopt a new driving style to get all the regen braking available.
Not everyone likes this new style of driving, imho.
 

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Yes, I am saying it's a burden. It's more work load for the driver. You never get to take your right foot off the Go Pedal to coast and relax.
The position of the foot is more relaxed for me when I feather the acceleration pedal than when I put it down on the floor. And by the way, nothing stops you from giving a tap to the shifter and move to D and coast. Tap it again and engage L again once you had enough of coasting and using the right foot to break.

Ohh, wait, it’s the same foot that was feathering the acceleration pedal, now is feathering the break pedal in this situation. Silly me, how could I propose you to use D and having the same burden on your poor foot. 🤦🏻‍♂️
 

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OK, you win at word count.
But are you saying most EV drivers use the 1 Pedal Style of driving? It's not clear...

Yes, I am saying it's a burden. It's more work load for the driver. You never get to take your right foot off the Go Pedal to coast and relax.

Yes, 'Standard regen' in a Tesla means using the Friction Brakes and not getting much regen during a 'slow down to stop'.

The moral of this long saga is:
Blended Brakes is a high-tech feature that Tesla's don't have.
Anyone can drive an EV Normal Style with Blended Brakes and not use the Friction Brakes for the most part.
Tesla's force you to adopt a new driving style to get all the regen braking available.
Not everyone likes this new style of driving, imho.
I can't say what most EV drivers prefer but I can say that before the Model 3 had the ability to use 1 pedal driving via OTA upgrade, many Bolt forum members were quick to point out all the advantages to 1 pedal driving. I have mine set for 1 pedal and prefer it but to be honest, I don't even think about feathering. Either I've gotten real lucky or real acute to being able to time letting off the accelerator based on speed, distance, grade so that I come to a full stop with my foot still resting on the accelerator. But if you like coasting with your foot off the accelerator, use Low. That will allow you to coast more than Standard regen will. I drive normal style and do not use the friction brakes for the most part. There is no "style" of driving a Tesla that is any different than a Bolt. You push the accelerator to move the car, you let off the accelerator to slow the car down, you use the brake for a panic stop. How is that any different? That's how it worked on my Leaf too.

I think another member pointed out that there are more choices to driving styles in a Tesla.
There's
  1. 2 choices of regen: (neutral or no regen is not a selection) Low or Standard
  2. 3 choices of stopping mode: Creep, Roll, or Hold
  3. 3 choices of steering wheel feedback: Comfort, Standard, or Sport
  4. 2 choices of efficiency: Chill or Standard
  5. Infinite power seat and steering wheel adjustments
So you have 36 different styles of driving that you can select. There's gotta be something in there that fits how you like to drive which is still unclear to me. As I mentioned a while back. I would be surprised if you drove a Tesla and thought, gee, this feels so weird to me. I don't think I can get used to it. Especially if you've been driving an EV.

My preference though is zero pedal driving especially now with the traffic light recognition.
 

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The moral of this long saga is:
Blended Brakes is a high-tech feature that Tesla's don't have.
Anyone can drive an EV Normal Style with Blended Brakes and not use the Friction Brakes for the most part.
Tesla's force you to adopt a new driving style to get all the regen braking available.
Not everyone likes this new style of driving, imho.
Note: Dyefrog posted while I was writing this up.

I finally took out my Model 3 to double check all the claims here. I can report that what's been discussed is right. To summarize:

In a Model 3 you have the option of "Low" and "Standard" regen. Low feels and acts like the Bolt does in "D" mode. Standard feels and acts like the Bolt does in "L" mode.

When the brakes are used in the Model 3 you do not get any additional regen up to a certain threshold, it simply applies the brakes. So yes, this means you don't get any additional regen applied before the brakes are applied as with the Bolt (what is being called blended brakes).

Now for the opinion portion: You are totally making a mountain out of a mole hill. In normal situations you don't even notice the difference between how the Tesla drives and how the Bolt drives in either mode. And the loss of additional regen due to there being no "blended" braking is minimal under normal driving. There's really nothing you need to relearn. Every person that has driven my Model 3 from my 16 year old daughter to my friends and family has adapted to the one pedal driving immediately and they don't find it burdensome.

With my driving style I don't use the brakes in my Model 3 any more than I use them in my Bolt. So the lack of blended braking doesn't matter to me as I really don't use it or get any advantage from it. I doubt most people here would notice a difference in brake use either. Sure, I'll take the blended braking on the Bolt, the one or two times a month where it may get used is nice. But it wouldn't influence my decision about purchasing either car. If you are even considering this difference to be a deal breaker when deciding between the two vehicles, you are wasting time. There's plenty of more meaningful differences between the vehicles to concentrate on. So take that however you want, I'm just some random guy on the Internet, and I understand that you may not agree with me. But my opinion isn't based on hand waving, guessing, and conjecture, it is based on the fact that I currently own and regularly drive both cars and have experienced how both drive and behave.

And finally, if Tesla wanted to implement blended braking, I'm sure they could do it through a software update just like they did with one pedal driving.
 

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What's the difference between controlling fishtailing in "D" mode by modulating the brake pedal vs. in "L" mode by modulating the accelerator pedal? It seems to me you should be able to apply the same deceleration force, it's just that you're doing it with a different method. With blended braking it's not as if you're get braking force on all four wheels in "D" mode unless you're pushing that pedal pretty aggressively, which is presumably what you're trying to avoid.
Let's assume you are correct. In normal circumstances, you don't get any braking force on the rear wheels until regen has been tapped out. (I don't know that this is true, but I'll accept it as true for the sake of argument). What happens when you hit some ice and traction control cuts in? Is that still true? I don't think it is, but I cannot prove it. Unless you can prove that it is not, I will continue to drive in D during the winter.

Also, empirically, I seem to be able to control the sliding much more in D than in L.
 

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..And finally, if Tesla wanted to implement blended braking, I'm sure they could do it through a software update just like they did with one pedal driving.
Just to clarify, when I say 1 Pedal driving style, I mean when you let off the Go Pedal the EV goes into max regen.

Someone new to a Tesla is herky jerky on the Go Pedal. They must assimilate.:sneaky:

You don't get coast when you let off the Go Pedal, unless in that 'Low' mode, which then requires friction brakes to slow any quicker than the default Low regen amount.

I believe Tesla's have always been this way and the Brake Pedal is strictly Friction Brakes.
I doubt the hardware is there to allow SW to suddenly give a Tesla Blended Brakes.
 
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