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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for the weird formatting. Copy/pasted from reddit, so no in-line pics :(

Two weeks ago now (you lose track of time when you're going through some personal issues...), my wife and I took a quick little overnight trip to the Trona Pinnacles near Death Valley. This was mostly intended as a performance and range test for a longer trip we're planning on taking to the Grand Canyon next spring, but also of course to get away from the daily grind that we've spent way too much time in lately and see something cool.

Here we are all packed loaded up and ready to go.

But first, we had to make one quick stop.

All together we're dragging 6,500 lbs down the road Beverly Hillbillies of Wrath style. Plus the weigh of my fat ass, which I won't disclose here, since I was out of the car taking the pictures. Granny and her rocking chair would absolutely kill the aerodynamics, though, so we had to toss her in the trailer.

The trailer itself is 1,300 lbs empty, plus 34 gallons of water (situated directly over the axle) and whatever gear we weren't able to fit inside the Bolt. At 1,760 lbs on the axle and figuring the usual 10% tongue weight, it was probably around 1,955 lbs. The Bolt isn't technically rated to tow anything and the hitch itself claims 2,000 lbs, so this is fine, right?

My wife did most of the driving since her Bolt is the one that's set up for towing, but all in all the driving experience was fine. You could definitely tell the trailer was back there, but the rear air bags inflated to 30 psi did a lot to improve handling because they allowed the suspension to actually have some travel instead of being compressed by the weight of the trailer. Between the airbags and the "drop" hitch flipped upside down, we were able to get everything perfectly level, which probably helped with aerodynamics as well.

Power was honestly a non-issue. At "only" 200 hp, the Bolt didn't feel any slower than the V6 stick shift Nissan XTerra we previously towed with. Instant torque and no shifting do a lot to compensate for a lower overall power number, not to mention that in the conditions we experienced throughout most of our trip, the XTerra would have given us about a real-world 12 mpg.

The first leg of our trip included a mountain pass with ~3,000 ft of elevation gain, through which we had no trouble maintaining ~60 mph. The XTerra could have done that too, but it would be screaming its guts out at the top of the RPM range and just an overall less pleasant driving experience. Our 4-cylinder Tacoma would have been crawling along in the semi truck lane.


Charging Stop 1: Electrify America, Hesperia, CA
From our house to the Electrify Walmart in Hesperia was a total of 55.6 miles, and we arrived with 58% battery remaining. Assuming an advertised battery capacity of 64 kwh, that is an efficiency of right around 2 mi/kwh. Not bad when you consider that pretty much this entire leg of the trip was uphill, including a steep grade right at the end, and approximately 3,000 ft of elevation gain total. There was no wind, and just a light mist of rain that stopped once we got over the pass and into the desert. But right as we got over the hill, the wind started... oh, the wind :(

Although it wasn't ideal, we still had to stop here as the next charger without going out of our way is ~98 miles away, and we wouldn't have made it. We did some shopping at Wal-Mart and when we got done, the car was at 89% with a total of 20.9 kwh added. At the EA member rate, our cost "should" have been $6.50, but the charger/app glitched and did not bill us. This was the only stop where we had to detach our trailer, and for that reason we chose not to stop here again on the way back.

Arrival: 58%
Departure: 89%
KWh added: 20.9
Cost: $6.50
Distance: 55.6 miles
Efficiency: ~2 mi/kwh


Charging Stop 2: ChargePoint, Brady's Market, Inyokern, CA
Unfortunately, the only (working) fast charger anywhere near the Trona Pinnacles is out of our way about 10 miles in each direction. It would have been nice if there was one in Ridgecrest (we passed a Denny's that would have been a perfect location; there is a Denny's about halfway between our house and northern California that makes a great lunch/charting stop), but oh well. What we got was a pair of ChargePoints at a very run-down old gas station and mini-mart without much else besides restrooms. Thankfully, we knew this ahead of time from the PlugShare reviews, and came prepared.

On the plus side, we were able to charge, turn around, and leave all without detaching our trailer. On the negative, though, we knew this picnic table was there and planned to use it for our lunch while we waited, but the wind ever since we got out of Hesperia was so bad that we watched it blow over this tree as we were plugging in. Although there was a slight elevation loss, the constant crosswind did not do our efficiency any favors.

This charger was on the expensive side ($0.44/kwh), but definitely not as bad as the $6 gas at the same location. We were not particularly inclined to care, though, as the $500 in EVGO credits we each got for buying our Bolts also works at ChargePoint locations, so it didn't cost us anything out of pocket.

Arrival: 23%
Departure: 92%
KWh added: 49.0
Cost: $21.82
Distance: 98.5 miles
Efficiency: ~2.3 mi/kwh


The Pinnacles
Unfortunately, it was another 38 miles from our last charging stop to our campsite, fighting the afternoon wind that was actually picking up a bit now. The last 5 miles of this was actually down a (decently maintained) dirt road with some washboarding and a couple of sandy spots. I had looked it up online beforehand and everyone said that a 2wd car could get down it fine if you went slow, so I didn't expect it to be much of an issue, but of course that's not the same as confirming in person that we could get through.

We made it to what would become our campsite with 65% battery, unhooked the trailer, and did some exploring. Although the area was small enough to easily check out on foot in a couple hours, it was still really cool. FWIW, parts of both Planet of the Apes and one of the Star Trek movies were filmed here.

With the sun going down, it was finally time to set up camp and make dinner. The front wheel and trailer hitch made decent anchor points to tie our bathroom tent to until the wind finally died down.

It rained overnight and by the time we had gotten most of our stuff packed back up, the wind was picking up again, so we decided we had seen enough yesterday and were ready to leave. We now had a decision to make - take a shortcut and try to make it 72 miles on 65% battery to a charger at a rest stop in Boron, CA, or add some extra time to the trip and go back to Brady's Market, which we knew we could do. ABRP with the OBD2 hooked up thought we could make it to Boron with 17% left, but we chose not to trust it and it's probably a good thing we didn't.


Intermission
We were driving pretty much directly into the wind the whole way back to Brady's, and just kept watching our range get less and less. We knew we'd made it there, but as we approached the place we'd have to turn to go to Boron, it was becoming clear that we absolutely wouldn't make it. Oh well, no harm in taking a detour to make sure we don't get stranded. At a random stop light in the middle of nowhere, we picked up a hitch-hiker that would become our travel companion for the rest of the day. He has gone from cold and shivering to warm and sleepy to happy and purring since we picked him up off the side of the road. Good thing, too, because it started pouring rain right as we plugged in to charge again, and did not let up for the rest of the day.


Charging Stop 3: Brady's Market (again)
Back here again for a quick charge. Pulled in with 26% so between the unrelenting wind and pouring rain that's about to start, there is no way we would have made it another 35 miles to Boron. Also, from here on out we abused the heater for the rest of the trip as well, which probably didn't help things.

Arrival: 26%
Departure: 72%
KWh added: 29.3
Cost: $13.05
Distance: ~80-ish(?) miles
Efficiency: ~1.9-ish(?) mi/kwh


Charging Stop 4: Rest Area, Boron CA
Honestly, thank god this was here. Just a single 50kw charger at a rest stop, but with the weather we were experiencing (still very windy, but now with temperatures in the 40s and pouring rain the entire time we were driving), we would have had to charge to 100% at Brady's and even then it might have been cutting it close. There was so much rain and visibility was so bad that there were parts of this leg where we didn't feel comfortable going more than about 45 mph, but hey, that helps efficiency at least. ABRP predicted we'd get here with about 26% and we pulled in with 20, so it probably would have been accurate if not for the absolutely awful weather conditions. But at least we could just sit in the car with the heat on without having to unhook, and this charge was completely free so we didn't even have to pay for the extra power draw.

We also drove past at least a couple miles of absolutely massive fields of solar panels on our way here. Probably not doing much right now, but on any normal day we'd probably be charging entirely on sunlight here.

Arrival: 20%
Departure: 65%
KWh added: 32.5
Cost: Free
Distance: 63.9 miles
Efficiency: ~1.9 mi/kwh


Charging Stop 5: ChargePoint, Chevron, Victorville, CA
Finally, we're on the home stretch. It's still wet, windy, and cold, so we're not thrilled with the idea of having to detach the trailer to use EA again. After looking at pictures on PlugShare, this looks like the best spot for us to not have to do this is a ChargePoint station an exit up the freeway from our first stop. When we got there, it turns out this was correct. At this point, the wind finally died down and the rain had slowed to a drizzle from a downpour, but we still didn't feel like messing with the trailer when we could be sitting in the car watching YouTube with the heat on.

An unfortunate consequence was that we couldn't get food while we were charging (we didn't feel like gas station convenience store food), but it's all downhill between here and home so we didn't need too much. Charged to 55% and went and got ourselves some Golden Corral, while the kitten snoozed away inside the backpack we brought for clothes, warm and wrapped in a jacket.

Side note, unless I did my math wrong, I have no idea why the efficiency was so bad on this leg of the trip. I thought maybe we were going slightly uphill, but according to Google it's pretty much entirely flat between Boron and Victorville. The weather was just as crappy as it had been all day. Maybe we used the heat more? Or maybe I'm not accounting for heater use while plugged into the chargers properly and that's skewing my calculations.

Arrival: 18%
Departure: 55%
KWh added: 23.7
Cost: $8.47
Distance: 50.5 miles
Efficiency: ~1.7 mi/kwh


Home
After charging our own batteries to 100% on greasy and absolutely terrible-for-your-body buffet food (but it tastes good and it's all you can eat, god damnit!) it was time to hit the road home. This last section was pretty much all downhill and at least the rain had stopped, but we were going a bit faster since we just wanted to get home. ABRP predicted we'd get home with 14% and we actually made it with 16.

Arrival: 16%
Distance: 59.2 miles
Cost: ~$11.82 (to charge back to 100%)
Efficiency: ~2.3 mi/kwh


Final Thoughts:
While we were hoping this would be a fair range test for longer trips in the future, it turns out that it was pretty much the worst-case scenario. Even with the weather heavily stacked against us, we still hovered right around 2 mi/kwh for most of the trip. We plan to do this type of trip at least two more times next year, in the spring/summer when that shouldn't be nearly as much of a problem.

Total cost, including charging back up to 100% after returning home, was $61.66. Of course, we didn't actually pay the vast majority of that due to EA glitching and our EVGO credits. For comparison, even assuming a "generous" 15 mpg, our XTerra would have cost $134 at $5/gal. More if we had to fill up in the middle of nowhere, where gas is often overpriced. My in-laws took their ICE SUV and tent trailer up to Northern California and back over the summer and it cost them $500 just in gas.

In terms of performance, the Bolt handled the trip flawlessly. Due to its weight and low center of gravity, as well as the weight of the trailer and all our gear, even the high winds didn't really do much for drivability and handling, other than kill the efficiency. The smoothness, quietness, and "effortlessness" of even a "low performance" electric motor is loads better than the harsh noise and vibration of an ICE, especially when it's struggling to drag a trailer up a hill. And as a huge bonus, I plan on hardwiring an inverter under the hood with a couple of plugs inside the car so we can use it as a giant battery pack while camping.

Total distance: 404 miles
Efficiency: 2.1 mi/kwh (according to trip meter)
Cost: $61.66
 

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Sorry for the weird formatting. Copy/pasted from reddit, so no in-line pics :(

Two weeks ago now (you lose track of time when you're going through some personal issues...), my wife and I took a quick little overnight trip to the Trona Pinnacles near Death Valley. This was mostly intended as a performance and range test for a longer trip we're planning on taking to the Grand Canyon next spring, but also of course to get away from the daily grind that we've spent way too much time in lately and see something cool.

Here we are all packed loaded up and ready to go.

But first, we had to make one quick stop.

All together we're dragging 6,500 lbs down the road Beverly Hillbillies of Wrath style. Plus the weigh of my fat ass, which I won't disclose here, since I was out of the car taking the pictures. Granny and her rocking chair would absolutely kill the aerodynamics, though, so we had to toss her in the trailer.

The trailer itself is 1,300 lbs empty, plus 34 gallons of water (situated directly over the axle) and whatever gear we weren't able to fit inside the Bolt. At 1,760 lbs on the axle and figuring the usual 10% tongue weight, it was probably around 1,955 lbs. The Bolt isn't technically rated to tow anything and the hitch itself claims 2,000 lbs, so this is fine, right?

My wife did most of the driving since her Bolt is the one that's set up for towing, but all in all the driving experience was fine. You could definitely tell the trailer was back there, but the rear air bags inflated to 30 psi did a lot to improve handling because they allowed the suspension to actually have some travel instead of being compressed by the weight of the trailer. Between the airbags and the "drop" hitch flipped upside down, we were able to get everything perfectly level, which probably helped with aerodynamics as well.

Power was honestly a non-issue. At "only" 200 hp, the Bolt didn't feel any slower than the V6 stick shift Nissan XTerra we previously towed with. Instant torque and no shifting do a lot to compensate for a lower overall power number, not to mention that in the conditions we experienced throughout most of our trip, the XTerra would have given us about a real-world 12 mpg.

The first leg of our trip included a mountain pass with ~3,000 ft of elevation gain, through which we had no trouble maintaining ~60 mph. The XTerra could have done that too, but it would be screaming its guts out at the top of the RPM range and just an overall less pleasant driving experience. Our 4-cylinder Tacoma would have been crawling along in the semi truck lane.


Charging Stop 1: Electrify America, Hesperia, CA
From our house to the Electrify Walmart in Hesperia was a total of 55.6 miles, and we arrived with 58% battery remaining. Assuming an advertised battery capacity of 64 kwh, that is an efficiency of right around 2 mi/kwh. Not bad when you consider that pretty much this entire leg of the trip was uphill, including a steep grade right at the end, and approximately 3,000 ft of elevation gain total. There was no wind, and just a light mist of rain that stopped once we got over the pass and into the desert. But right as we got over the hill, the wind started... oh, the wind :(

Although it wasn't ideal, we still had to stop here as the next charger without going out of our way is ~98 miles away, and we wouldn't have made it. We did some shopping at Wal-Mart and when we got done, the car was at 89% with a total of 20.9 kwh added. At the EA member rate, our cost "should" have been $6.50, but the charger/app glitched and did not bill us. This was the only stop where we had to detach our trailer, and for that reason we chose not to stop here again on the way back.

Arrival: 58%
Departure: 89%
KWh added: 20.9
Cost: $6.50
Distance: 55.6 miles
Efficiency: ~2 mi/kwh


Charging Stop 2: ChargePoint, Brady's Market, Inyokern, CA
Unfortunately, the only (working) fast charger anywhere near the Trona Pinnacles is out of our way about 10 miles in each direction. It would have been nice if there was one in Ridgecrest (we passed a Denny's that would have been a perfect location; there is a Denny's about halfway between our house and northern California that makes a great lunch/charting stop), but oh well. What we got was a pair of ChargePoints at a very run-down old gas station and mini-mart without much else besides restrooms. Thankfully, we knew this ahead of time from the PlugShare reviews, and came prepared.

On the plus side, we were able to charge, turn around, and leave all without detaching our trailer. On the negative, though, we knew this picnic table was there and planned to use it for our lunch while we waited, but the wind ever since we got out of Hesperia was so bad that we watched it blow over this tree as we were plugging in. Although there was a slight elevation loss, the constant crosswind did not do our efficiency any favors.

This charger was on the expensive side ($0.44/kwh), but definitely not as bad as the $6 gas at the same location. We were not particularly inclined to care, though, as the $500 in EVGO credits we each got for buying our Bolts also works at ChargePoint locations, so it didn't cost us anything out of pocket.

Arrival: 23%
Departure: 92%
KWh added: 49.0
Cost: $21.82
Distance: 98.5 miles
Efficiency: ~2.3 mi/kwh


The Pinnacles
Unfortunately, it was another 38 miles from our last charging stop to our campsite, fighting the afternoon wind that was actually picking up a bit now. The last 5 miles of this was actually down a (decently maintained) dirt road with some washboarding and a couple of sandy spots. I had looked it up online beforehand and everyone said that a 2wd car could get down it fine if you went slow, so I didn't expect it to be much of an issue, but of course that's not the same as confirming in person that we could get through.

We made it to what would become our campsite with 65% battery, unhooked the trailer, and did some exploring. Although the area was small enough to easily check out on foot in a couple hours, it was still really cool. FWIW, parts of both Planet of the Apes and one of the Star Trek movies were filmed here.

With the sun going down, it was finally time to set up camp and make dinner. The front wheel and trailer hitch made decent anchor points to tie our bathroom tent to until the wind finally died down.

It rained overnight and by the time we had gotten most of our stuff packed back up, the wind was picking up again, so we decided we had seen enough yesterday and were ready to leave. We now had a decision to make - take a shortcut and try to make it 72 miles on 65% battery to a charger at a rest stop in Boron, CA, or add some extra time to the trip and go back to Brady's Market, which we knew we could do. ABRP with the OBD2 hooked up thought we could make it to Boron with 17% left, but we chose not to trust it and it's probably a good thing we didn't.


Intermission
We were driving pretty much directly into the wind the whole way back to Brady's, and just kept watching our range get less and less. We knew we'd made it there, but as we approached the place we'd have to turn to go to Boron, it was becoming clear that we absolutely wouldn't make it. Oh well, no harm in taking a detour to make sure we don't get stranded. At a random stop light in the middle of nowhere, we picked up a hitch-hiker that would become our travel companion for the rest of the day. He has gone from cold and shivering to warm and sleepy to happy and purring since we picked him up off the side of the road. Good thing, too, because it started pouring rain right as we plugged in to charge again, and did not let up for the rest of the day.


Charging Stop 3: Brady's Market (again)
Back here again for a quick charge. Pulled in with 26% so between the unrelenting wind and pouring rain that's about to start, there is no way we would have made it another 35 miles to Boron. Also, from here on out we abused the heater for the rest of the trip as well, which probably didn't help things.

Arrival: 26%
Departure: 72%
KWh added: 29.3
Cost: $13.05
Distance: ~80-ish(?) miles
Efficiency: ~1.9-ish(?) mi/kwh


Charging Stop 4: Rest Area, Boron CA
Honestly, thank god this was here. Just a single 50kw charger at a rest stop, but with the weather we were experiencing (still very windy, but now with temperatures in the 40s and pouring rain the entire time we were driving), we would have had to charge to 100% at Brady's and even then it might have been cutting it close. There was so much rain and visibility was so bad that there were parts of this leg where we didn't feel comfortable going more than about 45 mph, but hey, that helps efficiency at least. ABRP predicted we'd get here with about 26% and we pulled in with 20, so it probably would have been accurate if not for the absolutely awful weather conditions. But at least we could just sit in the car with the heat on without having to unhook, and this charge was completely free so we didn't even have to pay for the extra power draw.

We also drove past at least a couple miles of absolutely massive fields of solar panels on our way here. Probably not doing much right now, but on any normal day we'd probably be charging entirely on sunlight here.

Arrival: 20%
Departure: 65%
KWh added: 32.5
Cost: Free
Distance: 63.9 miles
Efficiency: ~1.9 mi/kwh


Charging Stop 5: ChargePoint, Chevron, Victorville, CA
Finally, we're on the home stretch. It's still wet, windy, and cold, so we're not thrilled with the idea of having to detach the trailer to use EA again. After looking at pictures on PlugShare, this looks like the best spot for us to not have to do this is a ChargePoint station an exit up the freeway from our first stop. When we got there, it turns out this was correct. At this point, the wind finally died down and the rain had slowed to a drizzle from a downpour, but we still didn't feel like messing with the trailer when we could be sitting in the car watching YouTube with the heat on.

An unfortunate consequence was that we couldn't get food while we were charging (we didn't feel like gas station convenience store food), but it's all downhill between here and home so we didn't need too much. Charged to 55% and went and got ourselves some Golden Corral, while the kitten snoozed away inside the backpack we brought for clothes, warm and wrapped in a jacket.

Side note, unless I did my math wrong, I have no idea why the efficiency was so bad on this leg of the trip. I thought maybe we were going slightly uphill, but according to Google it's pretty much entirely flat between Boron and Victorville. The weather was just as crappy as it had been all day. Maybe we used the heat more? Or maybe I'm not accounting for heater use while plugged into the chargers properly and that's skewing my calculations.

Arrival: 18%
Departure: 55%
KWh added: 23.7
Cost: $8.47
Distance: 50.5 miles
Efficiency: ~1.7 mi/kwh


Home
After charging our own batteries to 100% on greasy and absolutely terrible-for-your-body buffet food (but it tastes good and it's all you can eat, god damnit!) it was time to hit the road home. This last section was pretty much all downhill and at least the rain had stopped, but we were going a bit faster since we just wanted to get home. ABRP predicted we'd get home with 14% and we actually made it with 16.

Arrival: 16%
Distance: 59.2 miles
Cost: ~$11.82 (to charge back to 100%)
Efficiency: ~2.3 mi/kwh


Final Thoughts:
While we were hoping this would be a fair range test for longer trips in the future, it turns out that it was pretty much the worst-case scenario. Even with the weather heavily stacked against us, we still hovered right around 2 mi/kwh for most of the trip. We plan to do this type of trip at least two more times next year, in the spring/summer when that shouldn't be nearly as much of a problem.

Total cost, including charging back up to 100% after returning home, was $61.66. Of course, we didn't actually pay the vast majority of that due to EA glitching and our EVGO credits. For comparison, even assuming a "generous" 15 mpg, our XTerra would have cost $134 at $5/gal. More if we had to fill up in the middle of nowhere, where gas is often overpriced. My in-laws took their ICE SUV and tent trailer up to Northern California and back over the summer and it cost them $500 just in gas.

In terms of performance, the Bolt handled the trip flawlessly. Due to its weight and low center of gravity, as well as the weight of the trailer and all our gear, even the high winds didn't really do much for drivability and handling, other than kill the efficiency. The smoothness, quietness, and "effortlessness" of even a "low performance" electric motor is loads better than the harsh noise and vibration of an ICE, especially when it's struggling to drag a trailer up a hill. And as a huge bonus, I plan on hardwiring an inverter under the hood with a couple of plugs inside the car so we can use it as a giant battery pack while camping.

Total distance: 404 miles
Efficiency: 2.1 mi/kwh (according to trip meter)
Cost: $61.66
Great write up, and congrats on the successful test trip. Sounds like it went quite well, especially considering that "the Bolt can't tow."
 

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Thanks for the write up.

We've been flip-flopping between getting a tent or a small, lightweight motorcycle tent trailer for our Bolt EV. Your piece takes a bit of the mystery out of towing.

One question though...what happens to insurance coverage if you get into an accident while towing in a vehicle that the manufacturer says is not recommended for towing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'd imagine that they'd pay the claim like anything else. We had a (large) bird cage fly out of the back of a trailer that we were towing with a Chevy Cavalier. Granted the tow vehicle didn't factor into it, but they didn't even mention it to us, nor the fact that the cage was unsecured.
 

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Thanks for the write up.

We've been flip-flopping between getting a tent or a small, lightweight motorcycle tent trailer for our Bolt EV. Your piece takes a bit of the mystery out of towing.

One question though...what happens to insurance coverage if you get into an accident while towing in a vehicle that the manufacturer says is not recommended for towing?
An excellent question. Sounds like unlimited liability for the EV driver. Consider, God forbid, that the car was involved in a fatal accident. If the insurance company caught on that your car was not equipped properly, they could refuse coverage easily. Also consider yourself. How would you feel about being the contributer to a death? When we had a motor home, we towed a car, and I was very attentive to proper hook-up, braking capability, etc. if such an accident case happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Asking the real questions. His name is Brady because we were on our way to charge at Brady's Market and he is the newest addition to our household <3

He loves to climb inside our pants when we sit on the toilet and he purrs if we so much as look at him.
 

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When we had a motor home, we towed a car, and I was very attentive to proper hook-up, braking capability, etc.
Wish all the gomers in those moving roadblocks were paying attention to the signs which say, "Slow vehicles with five or more following must use turn-out". That's routinely ignored and seldom ticketed.

One story from Idaho a couple of years back - a gomer couple in a motor home with a toad behind, the car had a flat tire and ran until the tire got so hot it caught on fire and continued on throwing off flaming chunks, setting the countryside ablaze. Finally, the ISP was able to roadblock him and said, "Several people phoned they'd passed you, waved, pointed, honked, but you ignored them." The driver said, "Well, Mother doesn't like me driving the speed limit, so we're used to folks behind us being mad; we just pay them no mind." Last I read, his insurance company was on the hook for a million in firefighting costs.

jack vines
 
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