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Discussion Starter #1
I found a close up shot of what the Bolt's engine bay will look like and there's a sticker showing you how to cut off the power? Personally don't really know what everything is but I assume someone here can make heads and tails of this.

 

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Thanks ! To me.. that pretty much just looks like a hyper photon plasma flux capacitor... but that's just my knowledge on it..
 

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Anything orange is high voltage (for first responders)
12v battery and brake master cylinder/reservoir on the far right (in the photo)
Blue fluid reservoir is washer fluid
The coolant reservoirs for the 3 loops are visible (red orange fluid)
AC compressor and hoses on the left.
Center is the usual electronics for an EV (inverter/charger/BMS, etc)
 

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The Bolt's layout is so much cleaner than the average gas engine bay and everything is easier to locate. Now I can see where the washer fluid levels are without guessing and thanks to DucRider, I know to stay away from anything orange. Sure they're wrapped in a protective layer but now that I know what they are, it makes me a little anxious.
 

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Anything orange is high voltage (for first responders)
12v battery and brake master cylinder/reservoir on the far right (in the photo)
Blue fluid reservoir is washer fluid
The coolant reservoirs for the 3 loops are visible (red orange fluid)
AC compressor and hoses on the left.
Center is the usual electronics for an EV (inverter/charger/BMS, etc)
That was a great breakdown, with some vital information for those of us that have no idea what the heck is going on in there. Thanks !
 

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Does anyone know what the orange fluid in the translucent plastic bottle near the dash and behind the hood support rod is? Being an ICE driver and totally ignorant of BEV systems, I'm guessing battery temperature regulation fluid?

It's a brave new world out there and I've got a lot to learn.

Many thanks to all of the kind folks on the forum who so generously share their experience and knowledge.
 

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Does anyone know what the orange fluid in the translucent plastic bottle near the dash and behind the hood support rod is? Being an ICE driver and totally ignorant of BEV systems, I'm guessing battery temperature regulation fluid?

It's a brave new world out there and I've got a lot to learn.

Many thanks to all of the kind folks on the forum who so generously share their experience and knowledge.
Coolant (GM uses Dexcool which is orange instead of green)
If you look closely there are 3 reservoirs with the orange coolant
1) Battery Pack (takes 6.9L)
2) Power Electronics (Inverter/charger) & Drive Unit (3.9L)
3) Passenger compartment (1.8L)

Not sure which is which
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All those batteries probably needs extra cooling and there needs to be enough to go around the whole floor of the Bolt where they're located. That's a lot of area to cover and I guess that's why there's so much coolant.

Found a diagram showing us areas that needs cooling.

 

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What might help in the future is constructing the batteries of lighter material. So if the casing is metal, going to carbon fiber could save some, that along with savings elsewhere in the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not sure about heat dissipation but I know carbon fiber is supposed to have high heat tolerance.
 

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Pardon another basic question from a newbie.

I wonder why the Bolt and other BEV's use a single speed (transmission?) I've learned that the motors used in EV's make max torque at
0 RPM. Wouldn't a few extra speeds help lower the current draw at highway speeds?

If this has been asked before please direct me to the answer, if possible.

Thx, in advance
 

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Pardon another basic question from a newbie.

I wonder why the Bolt and other BEV's use a single speed (transmission?) I've learned that the motors used in EV's make max torque at
0 RPM. Wouldn't a few extra speeds help lower the current draw at highway speeds?

If this has been asked before please direct me to the answer, if possible.

Thx, in advance
Weight and complexity. Tesla played with a 2 speed for the S, but dropped the idea due to reliability concerns.

Torque is mostly called into play during acceleration. Cruising at highway speeds doesn't require loads of torque.
 

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Thanks again to DucRider.
I understand the torque curve.
I'm having trouble understanding the decrease in KW (draw) as the speeds increase on the right hand side of the graph.

I'm probably getting dumber quicker than I thought I was.

"Old age is not for the faint of heart."
 

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Thanks again to DucRider.
I understand the torque curve.
I'm having trouble understanding the decrease in KW (draw) as the speeds increase on the right hand side of the graph.

I'm probably getting dumber quicker than I thought I was.

"Old age is not for the faint of heart."
That's available torque and power - as in having the "go pedal" mashed to the floor. While a 2 speed tranny might be of some use, the benefits are marginal given the characteristics of electric motors and the added cost, weight and complexity of a multi-speed transmission.
 

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Thanks DucRider

I think I finally get it. Your comment about the "loud pedal" being mashed reminded me of the horsepower/ torque curves I used to study in the many motorcycle reviews I was reading a quarter century ago. Just like an ICE engine torque that peaks first then drops as the horsepower curve continues to rise for a period of time(rpm).

As the speed increases for a BEV the available torque falls quickly requiring more and more "juice" to continue to accelerate. Hence to poor highway mileage for EV's.
 

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So 40mph is where we want to drive for optimal speed without draining too much power?
The chart above shows available power/torgue on the 2013 Spark EV.



Here is a generic chart (NOT produced for the Bolt!) of what you are looking for:



Note that it is an inverse square relationship. 70 mph takes 4x the power as 35 mph.

Heres one calculated for a bicyclist:
 

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Thanks again DucRider. I fell like I should be giving a consultant's fee.
The speed/Kw chart should be.required reading for all motorists who are concerned about fuel economy and the money they spend for the fuel.

I can't count the times I've seen minivans and large suv's flying past me on the highway while I'm doing the speed limit + 2 or 3 mph.

When I get my Bolt it will be used for all those around town "errands" I seem to run now that I'm retired.
 
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