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I've had my Bolt for about a month now and have noticed that when the battery has a full charge regenerative braking is decidedly less effective. After the first mile or two of driving, regeneration works as expected.
 

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Didn't someone mention that regenerative braking needs some battery space so it has something to recharge? That's why regenerative charging mode doesn't charge the battery 100%.
 

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Didn't someone mention that regenerative braking needs some battery space so it has something to recharge? That's why regenerative charging mode doesn't charge the battery 100%.
Yes. It's another reason to use that Mountain Charge Mode that only charges the battery to 90%. If you are not going to use the maximum range in your day to day driving it is easier on your battery for long term reliability and you have regen available right from the charger. I plan to set my charging that way and only plan to charge to 100% if I'm going on a roadtrip.
 

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Read about the long term reliability of batteries if you don't fully charge them all the time. Every little thought helps if you plan to keep the Bolt for years to come and want to lose as little charging ability as possible.
 

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It seems to me that it would be pretty simple to just put in a big resistive load switched to the system so that when the battery is full, regen power goes to this big heater and the regen braking works normally. When the battery depletes enough, it switches back to charging the battery. No surprises for the driver no matter what the state of charge.
 

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at least when it comes to replacing batteries, what it will cost for the Bolt might not be as much as other vehicles since with that whole fleet deal it will hopefully dilute prices down the road especially with how hard those guys will be running them. Then there's also the self-driving Bolt end of things.
 

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It happened today

My wife was very shaken this morning by an experience almost exactly like the one that started this thread. She describes what happened as sudden acceleration. It was not raining, but in MN in January there can be icy spots anywhere. We had come to enjoy one-pedal driving, but, based on the consensus in this thread, we will not use L until warmer weather arrives, and maybe not even then.
 

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My wife was very shaken this morning by an experience almost exactly like the one that started this thread. She describes what happened as sudden acceleration. It was not raining, but in MN in January there can be icy spots anywhere. We had come to enjoy one-pedal driving, but, based on the consensus in this thread, we will not use L until warmer weather arrives, and maybe not even then.
Had to go back and read the original post. There's possibly another cause that can surprise an owner if they're unprepared. If one takes off their seatbelt, the car will not completely stop like it normally does in 'L' mode. It will slow down as normal, but right at about walking speed, it will stop slowing down and even feels like it accelerates. Especially unnerving if you're parking and heading for a barrier. For me, the first time it happened, I was pulling into my garage and suddenly I was heading for the wall. Luckily my decades of driving allowed my reflexes to hit the brake before it was too late. What did I do different? I checked my mail at the mailbox and didn't bother to put my seatbelt back on. Not knowing I was in for a surprise. I was a new Bolt owner and had not known about this "feature" of the Bolt. Now, I don't even think about it when it happens. I'm ready with my foot on the brake if I've left my seatbelt off.
 

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Some of your results obviously differ, but in driving the Bolt through two winters in the frozen northwest, we've used L mostly and never experienced any remotely disconcerting behavior, with only two minor owner-operator errors.

We agree one-pedal driving is the single best feature of the Bolt but now we always remember:

1. L with the seatbelt off behaves unexpectedly. Don't do that.
2. L with a full charge behaves unexpectedly on the first few decels. Use mountaintop.

On this rainy morning while turning to park in a stall and so I take my food off the accelerator and expected the heavy regenerative braking. Instead it accelerated in to the stall and so I had to brake heavily and it still didn't seem to take hold. Luckily the cement parking block stopped the car albeit I still went over it. No damage but adrenaline.
Had to go back and read the original post. There's possibly another cause that can surprise an owner if they're unprepared. If one takes off their seatbelt, the car will not completely stop like it normally does in 'L' mode. It will slow down as normal, but right at about walking speed, it will stop slowing down and even feels like it accelerates. Especially unnerving if you're parking and heading for a barrier. For me, the first time it happened, I was pulling into my garage and suddenly I was heading for the wall.
Saw this happen to another Bolt owner. He released his seatbelt to get his parking pass card out of his wallet, didn't replace his seat belt and had to footbrake panic stop as he was heading for a wall.

jack vines
 

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Some of your results obviously differ, but in driving the Bolt through two winters in the frozen northwest, we've used L mostly and never experienced any remotely disconcerting behavior, with only two minor owner-operator errors.

We agree one-pedal driving is the single best feature of the Bolt but now we always remember:

1. L with the seatbelt off behaves unexpectedly. Don't do that.
2. L with a full charge behaves unexpectedly on the first few decels. Use mountaintop.




Saw this happen to another Bolt owner. He released his seatbelt to get his parking pass card out of his wallet, didn't replace his seat belt and had to footbrake panic stop as he was heading for a wall.

jack vines
With the 2019 if you don't have your seat belt on it still does full regenerative braking. I test this frequently when I stop to get the mail before I pull into the garage.
 

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Wow, this is a pretty big game changer and not something to lightly dismiss. If the car was truly accelerating and not just coasting with no regen then there is a software or hardware glitch. Remember the throttle is fly-by-wire as is everything else. The other day my cruise control worked in the morning, not in the evening.
The next day it was working again. I called my dealer and had them make a note in my file in case it turns up again. The Service guy said this is first time he heard of this. Makes me wonder with the whole car being a giant computer how many "this is the first time I hear about this" we are going to hear about. If it was me I would call up the food chain until someone really listens. I'm sure GM would love to avoid a class action lawsuit with a few lines of code.
 

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With the 2019 if you don't have your seat belt on it still does full regenerative braking. I test this frequently when I stop to get the mail before I pull into the garage.

But does it behave as normal in "L", or does it behave as if in "D", while in "L" with the seat belt off?


My Bolt does "full regenerative braking" regardless of whether or not I have the seat belt on, or whether I'm in "L" or "D". I just use the left paddle and/or the brake pedal.
 

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Some of your results obviously differ, but in driving the Bolt through two winters in the frozen northwest, we've used L mostly and never experienced any remotely disconcerting behavior, with only two minor owner-operator errors.

We agree one-pedal driving is the single best feature of the Bolt but now we always remember:

1. L with the seatbelt off behaves unexpectedly. Don't do that.
2. L with a full charge behaves unexpectedly on the first few decels. Use mountaintop.




Saw this happen to another Bolt owner. He released his seatbelt to get his parking pass card out of his wallet, didn't replace his seat belt and had to footbrake panic stop as he was heading for a wall.

jack vines

A friend bought a Bolt from our dealer and this exact same thing happened to his wife. She popped her seat belt off before being parked and the car released it's regen in L mode and moved forward like a normal ICE would if you didn't control it with the foot brake.

DON'T DO THIS! :eek:

I did this too! I was still able to control my car without a problem.
 

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But does it behave as normal in "L", or does it behave as if in "D", while in "L" with the seat belt off?


My Bolt does "full regenerative braking" regardless of whether or not I have the seat belt on, or whether I'm in "L" or "D". I just use the left paddle and/or the brake pedal.
The 2019 drives like normal "L" with the seat belt off. Trade now and get this feature plus separate heat and AC controls, the ability to limit charge from 40% to 100% by 5% increments and $7,500 TAX CREDIT.
 

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So does anyone know the answer to this question please? Do I get the same amount of regenerative braking from D and the brake pedal in normal driving as I get from L in normal driving?

Yes, light braking with the brake pedal in D uses regenerative braking. Heavy braking will go to the friction brakes.


The green/yellow ring in the display will be green during light (regenerative) braking, but will turn yellow if you brake hard enough to go to the friction brakes.
 

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Very possible for Regen to deactivate in slippery conditions. Hitting a large bump may also disengage Regen, which will feel like the car is actually speeding up (since you are expecting it to decelerate)
I've been thinking about this (I know, that's dangerous). If I'm decelerating in L mode, and I haven't lifted my foot completely off of the "go" pedal when a wheel loses traction and the car instantaneously switches from L to D, it seems to me that the residual depression of the go pedal could cause the car not just to seem to surge, but actually to surge because the go pedal is still depressed. Does that sound like a possibility?
 
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