Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
I agree that you should go after Mustart first, but failing that, @Kbecker 's suggestion about a possible auto insurance claim is also a good thing to check. It might even be worth finding out if your homeowner's insurance would cover the damage, since the incident occurred in your home. (Although it might not be worth filing a homeowner's insurance claim.)

I disagree that the only thing to repair is the Mustart handle, and I personally wouldn't try charging Level 1 or Level 2 until the wiring behind the charge port has been checked out. The damage doesn't look bad, but it might not be the only damage.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Is the Mustart unit UL approved? If so, then Chevy can't tell you it is unsafe to use for charging of your car and deny the warranty repair...
Except GM's warranty is supposed to cover defects with the Bolt, not defects with 3rd party equipment. If something else in my garage catches fire and damages my Bolt, GM wouldn't cover Bolt repairs under warranty.

OP would have to show that the damage came from a defect in the Bolt, not in the Mustart EVSE, for GM's warranty to apply. It doesn't matter how the equipment is rated - what matters is which unit is the source of the damage.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Have you told the dealership "Yeah, I was using and EVSE that is known to over heat and isn't UL approved"? If so, you are out of luck... if not keep your lips sealed.

Keith
Being a squeaky wheel can certainly get you pretty far. But it's a bit of a bluff - you're playing poker to some degree. You know the EVSE is known for overheating problems and is not UL listed, and you hope that GM won't call your bluff by forcing you to answer questions under oath (ie in arbitration).
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
At bit over dramatic, no? "under oath (ie in arbitration)" indeed.:rolleyes:
How many of this brand have had this issue?
How many have not?
How many EVSE available on the US market have this 'UL listing'?
Is that the only Make or Break consideration that gm is looking for?
If so,,
Why is this not in big bold RED letters in the Owner's Manual and tag on the charge port door?
Let's follow the train of thought here.

OP makes a fuss with the dealership that GM should repair damage under warranty. GM refuses. What then?
OP files a complaint the the EV concierge. GM still refuses. What then?
OP files a complaint with BBB or the state attorney general. They send a letter to GM, and GM says the Bolt didn't cause the damage, the EVSE did. GM still refuses to cover the repair. What then?

Does OP file a civil lawsuit or seek arbitration? GM can simply just keep saying "no, the EVSE caused the damage" and the burden is on OP to keep escalating and to prove otherwise.

The whole point is that if push comes to shove, OP will have to show somehow that the Bolt caused the damage, not the EVSE. If OP has to admit that he is aware of the lack of UL listing and the complaints regarding Mustart chargers, he's not going to win that argument.

All of that being said, I still think it's more likely that the EVSE caused the damage in fact. If so, GM shouldn't be expected to cover the repair under warranty, even if it's possible that the OP can argue his way into getting GM to cover it.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
The part that initially pissed me off and made me want the OP to go after the dealership was them handing him a line of Bull $hit that you are only allowed to use the EVSE that comes with the car, or an L2 purchased from Chevrolet...
I read that as only the EVSE that comes with the car or purchased from Chevrolet would cover the damage under warranty. That's because the equipment is provided by the company providing the warranty - it's not a 3rd party item.
The car software monitors and detects all types of charge amperage, voltage, heat and safety issues...
But the car software (nor the J1772 spec) does not detect for high temperature failure at the charge port, and does not guarantee that a high temperature failure at the charge port will be prevented. The OEM EVSE does detect for high temperature failure at the outlet. So the car's warranty doesn't cover what the car's design does not guarantee. Funny how that works...
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Thanks for the well reasoned response. The proximate cause may in fact be the use of ANY charger. The distal cause is lack of firmware that monitors resistance parameters to trip errors. Further, if GM knows certain chargers are historically injurious, then NOT stating specific charger use and exclusion policy regarding warranty coverage may make them more culpable, not less. Fun debate. Thanks.
Or GM could take the position that warranty coverage only applies to GM-supplied EVSEs, thus excluding all other 3rd party EVSEs that may or may not have a history of injury.

I still think that the owner should get relief against the EVSE manufacturer rather than against GM in this case. GM can point to a preponderance of evidence that their charging port functions correctly, while Mustart would have a problem when a discovery process reveals that they acknowledged a fault with some versions of their EVSE.

Putting a question to a jury (or an arbitrator) about what they think the preponderance of the evidence indicates - if you used a different EVSE with that specific Bolt, would the damage have occurred? If you used that specific Mustart EVSE with a different car, would the damage have occurred? I still think the case would go against Mustart, not GM.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Exactly! GM does not make you use GM gasoline only. You can use any cheap gas. They will still warranty your engine's misfires problems and injector problems.
You can also use any EVSE to charge your car.
IF the EVSE welds itself to the pins that is not GM's problem. That just means the seller misadvertized the EVSE and sold you a welder. :)
EVs are a bit different from ICE in this case.
When contaminated gasoline from Costco damaged engines, Costco paid for the repairs. It wasn't the car manufacturers that paid for the repairs.

In your scenario, I could add water to your gas tank, damaging your engine, and somehow your car's manufacturer would be liable for the repairs instead of me.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Why not a temperature sensor on both sides - the EVSE and the charge port? It's clearly a failure mode that seems more common (given the variety of EVSE manufacturers of varying reliability) compared to gas station pumps. So it would actually take 2 sensor / safety system failures for this type of event to occur. I'm sure NHTSA could do a cost-benefit analysis of the cost of the additional sensor vs the benefit in avoided damages. If the cost-benefit isn't there, we'll have to live with the occasional failure then.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top