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You know the funniest part! The load resistors are basically a heater consuming power to trick the monitoring. So power savings in this case might be moot. But definitely led for flashing bulbs is way better logevity wise.
 

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The 4 pack load resistors I got from Amazon were 50 watts, so it actually uses 2x the power as the stock lights. However the amount of power the turn signals use so minuscule it doesn't really matter. So yeah this is purely a visual modification.

I took a cellphone video of the LED turn signals when I only had one side of the car switched over, so you can see the difference:

Here is the video of the LED reverse light and license plate lights, again crappy cellphone video:
 

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Anyone know which bulbs are stock LED in the car. The manual says this but offers no details:

This vehicle has several LED lamps.
For replacement of any LED lighting
assembly, contact your dealer.
 

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I wouldn't use those. According to the link it says the thing draws 21 watts so the car won't think the bulb is out. 21 watts actually results in a lot of heat, it will probably be ridiculously bright and put out an unsafe amount of light, before melting itself and making a mess in your housing. IMO the only good option is to use a low wattage LED with resisters if you want to do this. But hey it's your car so feel free to experiment and let us know :)

P.S.
I see that the link says the output is 2800 lumens. That is probably BS since I doubt it will be that bright, but my guess is it will still be way too bright to be not glaring for other drivers. For reference your stock 35W HID outputs roughly 3200 lumens.
I did a complete LED upgrade to my wife's Chevy Equinox which does need the load resistors for the turn signal lights. But I saw that the LED turn signals lamps were on for a very short time, and the load resistors never heat up. My supplier is "Formula J87": http://formulaj87.com/ They also sell on eBay which is how I found them.

They sell complete kits for most car brands and models, including the correct load resistors. If anyone wants to see how I mounted the load resistors I have pictures from my work. Since she uses DRL all the time, it makes her Equinox very visible all day, all night, and even through a heavy rain to prevents accidents.:)
 

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Also recognize that LEDs come on almost instantly, vs incandescent. Note in the video above, how long it takes the incandescent to come up to full brightness as compared to the LED. For a brake light application, just a few milliseconds can be the difference between getting rear-ended...and not.
 

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Dumb question.... do the load resistors have to be 10watt? Once upon a time I owned a Honda Element and replaced all the brake lights with LED only to find the cruise control didn’t work. Turns out Honda uses a single pole brake switch and depends on the filaments of the incandescent lamps to pull the brake line voltage to 0v. With an LED in place, the lowest that would get was 1.2v and that was high enough to confuse the cruise control. My solution was to put a 1000 ohm 1/4watt resistor across one of the LED lamps to make that brake wire voltage get to 0v.

So.... do you really need such a large resistor to fool the CAN BUS or can you simply put a small 1k resistor across each LED lamp?
 

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Also recognize that LEDs come on almost instantly, vs incandescent. Note in the video above, how long it takes the incandescent to come up to full brightness as compared to the LED. For a brake light application, just a few milliseconds can be the difference between getting rear-ended...and not.
If you're talking milliseconds as the difference between impact/no impact, the speed at the time of impact would be very, very close to zero and likely result in little to no damage. (travel equals about 1 inch per millisecond at 60 mph)

Amazing how people will justify "upgrades" they want to make. It you want LED's because they're cool, more power to you. Just be aware that they will almost always result in lower performance when placed in a housing designed for incandescent.

Lumens are almost always overstated on LED's and are also a piss poor method to compare brightness between bulbs (total light output is not near as important as the light pattern/intensity in the direction needed and designed for in the reflector and housing). Many LED replacement bulbs will appear brighter in a narrow viewing angle and then quickly fade to non-existent if you move to the side at all. Not an issue at all for licence plate lights, somewhat of a bother for brake lights, unacceptable in turn signals. YMMV

There are some LED's that approach the performance of incandescent bulbs when placed in the OEM housings, but they come at a fairly steep price since they include optics to mimic the point source of an incandescent. Throwing a whole bunch of LED chips around the perimeter of the bulb doesn't work well.
 

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If you're talking milliseconds as the difference between impact/no impact, the speed at the time of impact would be very, very close to zero ... Amazing how people will justify "upgrades" they want to make.
To me, a great LED upgrade would be to include one of those circuits that "strobes" the brake lights briefly when they're first applied. That really catches the attention, and I could easily see that making a difference to marginally distracted drivers.
 

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Dumb question.... do the load resistors have to be 10watt? Once upon a time I owned a Honda Element and replaced all the brake lights with LED only to find the cruise control didn’t work. Turns out Honda uses a single pole brake switch and depends on the filaments of the incandescent lamps to pull the brake line voltage to 0v. With an LED in place, the lowest that would get was 1.2v and that was high enough to confuse the cruise control. My solution was to put a 1000 ohm 1/4watt resistor across one of the LED lamps to make that brake wire voltage get to 0v.

So.... do you really need such a large resistor to fool the CAN BUS or can you simply put a small 1k resistor across each LED lamp?

My guess you probably only need 20W resistor since that's how much the incandescent bulb uses. I'm not sure if 10W will be enough. I got 50W ones simply because those were more popular on Amazon and thus cheaper.
 

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To me, a great LED upgrade would be to include one of those circuits that "strobes" the brake lights briefly when they're first applied. That really catches the attention, and I could easily see that making a difference to marginally distracted drivers.
My wife and I both have them on our motorcycles as auxiliary brake lights. Sucks to get rear ended when in a car. Sucks worse on a motorcycle.
 

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There are some LED's that approach the performance of incandescent bulbs when placed in the OEM housings, but they come at a fairly steep price since they include optics to mimic the point source of an incandescent. Throwing a whole bunch of LED chips around the perimeter of the bulb doesn't work well.
I wanted a flashing brake light on my motorcycle and therefore had to use LED. What I found is that it's really hard to find an LED lamp that has much difference at all in brightness betwen the brake and running light functions. OEM LED's in brake and turnsignal housings are great, aftermarket LED lamps not so much.
 

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To me, a great LED upgrade would be to include one of those circuits that "strobes" the brake lights briefly when they're first applied. That really catches the attention, and I could easily see that making a difference to marginally distracted drivers.

Please buy one that doesn't blink continuously, I was behind one of those Sunday, it was so dam annoying I didn't notice the car had a turn signal on.
 

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I put this one on my motorcycle and it works great. REally. 3 fast, 3 slow then solid ON. [ame]https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I4J35HY/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]
 

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If you're talking milliseconds as the difference between impact/no impact, the speed at the time of impact would be very, very close to zero and likely result in little to no damage. (travel equals about 1 inch per millisecond at 60 mph)

Amazing how people will justify "upgrades" they want to make. It you want LED's because they're cool, more power to you. Just be aware that they will almost always result in lower performance when placed in a housing designed for incandescent.

Lumens are almost always overstated on LED's and are also a piss poor method to compare brightness between bulbs (total light output is not near as important as the light pattern/intensity in the direction needed and designed for in the reflector and housing). Many LED replacement bulbs will appear brighter in a narrow viewing angle and then quickly fade to non-existent if you move to the side at all. Not an issue at all for licence plate lights, somewhat of a bother for brake lights, unacceptable in turn signals. YMMV

There are some LED's that approach the performance of incandescent bulbs when placed in the OEM housings, but they come at a fairly steep price since they include optics to mimic the point source of an incandescent. Throwing a whole bunch of LED chips around the perimeter of the bulb doesn't work well.
Magrider's videos on page three are a great example of the faster on time of LEDs.

Place me among the group who would prefer "no impact". If replacing incandescent bulbs with LEDs will help get me there, sign me up.

Being a careful consumer and understanding the shortfalls of newer tech is a characteristic of savvy early adopters. One example: I've replaced the headlamps in my 2011 Volt with application specific LEDs. They are far superior to the halogens they replaced.
 

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To me, a great LED upgrade would be to include one of those circuits that "strobes" the brake lights briefly when they're first applied. That really catches the attention, and I could easily see that making a difference to marginally distracted drivers.
Dealer gets $200 for this:
Install:
 

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Just thought I’d document my LED upgrade, so others can save time.

as of now bad luck:
  • Philips 7443A LED Turn signal is too dim. Returning.
  • Philips 921 LED Reverse Light doesn't fit. It’s the right bulb, be the Philips is a tad wider than the stock, which makes it impossible to push in the socket.
(to be continued).
 
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