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I'm thinking of installing these new wirelessly-interconnected smoke detectors from Kidde or First Alert. If one goes off, they all go off. So if there's a fire in the garage, the bedroom detector will sound. They're $30 to $50. If only I hadn't just bought a bunch of non-interconnected ones...
 

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On the radio today, I heard about two car fires on the freeway in the San Francisco area.
 

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Your problem for not putting your charger near the door, not mine. And thank-you for making my point clear,"totally unknown causes" you say. Statistics are for liars and fools. You can make any problem sound OK if you twist the numbers. If I go to Las Vegas for a crap game, well there are statistics that can tell me my chance of winning. If the dice are loaded, than no statistics on earth can tell me what my chances are if I don't know they are. Well right now until we know more the dice are loaded as far as I'm concerned. You want to loose everything on that bet? Fine go ahead, go to bed tonight convinced you will not be the fourth fire because you got life all figured out.
By the way, have you read the news lately? Maybe Chicken Little was right. Proud to be Chicken Little than Barbecue Butch.
Really Richard? So when your electrician installed your L2 charger, you had him install it near the door so you could park your car outside because maybe someday there might be a tiny* fraction of Bolts with unexplained fires? Wow, you must be f**king clairvoyant!! Amazing!!! SMDH. You're an idiot. Sorry, but I practice medicine based on evidence. And the evidence here tells me unequivocally that you're an idiot.
 

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I'm thinking of installing these new wirelessly-interconnected smoke detectors from Kidde or First Alert. If one goes off, they all go off. So if there's a fire in the garage, the bedroom detector will sound. They're $30 to $50. If only I hadn't just bought a bunch of non-interconnected ones...
I've got a deal alert set for Nest Protect, which goes on sale for $60. It integrates with Google Home or Alexa, has an app to give remote notification, and does smoke and carbon monoxide. Lasts exactly 10 years. Requires WiFi connection. It does not tie into existing wired detectors.

I plan to put one in the garage and perhaps one centrally located on the main level. I don't have an EV yet.
 

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When I built my house, I had two smoke/heat (wired) detectors installed and a pull alarm in the garage. The pull alarm was a joke for the wife. She was a hose dragger at the time. I park my Bolt in the garage and I'm more concerned about my lawn tractor and weed whacker being the source of the fire than the Bolt. I'm not changing my habits but for what it's worth I'm not really concerned but I would think that EV's are more likely to cause a fire in a garage than their ICE counterpart, vehicles of the same age. Still an incident rate so low it's not worth worrying about, imho.
 

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Hah, as a kid I had the habit of cleaning up spilled gasoline in the garage by lighting it on fire. I spilled a little 100% of the time I filled something. One time was a bigger spill than normal, and it flared up big enough to make me take a step back, where I then kicked the open Jeep can over. A stream of fire spilled out into the garage and I had to prioritize the disaster. Grabbed the burning and spilling fuel can and chucked it out into the lawn. Grabbed a blanket and put the fire out on the pressure washer. Moved other equipment off of the areas of the floor that were burning. Dad asked me why there was a burned patch in the lawn, and I told him it was because I saved the garage from burning down... he had actually burned it down years earlier, so I think he gave me some slack.
 

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Really Richard? So when your electrician installed your L2 charger, you had him install it near the door so you could park your car outside because maybe someday there might be a tiny* fraction of Bolts with unexplained fires? Wow, you must be f**king clairvoyant!! Amazing!!! SMDH. You're an idiot. Sorry, but I practice medicine based on evidence. And the evidence here tells me unequivocally that you're an idiot.
Yes, I’m an idiot that I actually uses my garage for more than one thing like painting furniture or tuning up my bicycle or rolling out the table saw and cutting wood and I foresaw the time I may need to charge my Bolt
outside while doing projects inside. It is a single small one car garage under my house (drive down).
Besides, I installed my charger myself because I have an electrical license.
Clearly I made you upset and I am sorry for that. I was a little harsh but I simply do not understand the mind set of some people on this forum. Here we have the worst possible scenario where the car we all own can mysteriously catch on fire in our houses. I mean what on earth can be worse than that? And yet some folks rationalize it away with statistics as if can’t possibly happen to them because the magic eight ball told them so. Why is it so prevalent in human nature to think it always happens to the other guy? What Is the formula in probability and statistics that covers “I never though it would happen to me” when you get a diagnosis for terminal pancreatic cancer.
Numbers can only take you so far before real life come and kicks you in the butt.
So, again sorry.
 

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Yes, I’m an idiot that I actually use my garage for more than one thing like painting furniture or tuning up my bicycle or rolling out the table saw and cutting wood and I foresaw the time I may need to charge my Bolt
outside while doing projects inside. It is a single small one car garage under my house (drive down).
Besides, I installed my charger myself because I have an electrical license.
Clearly I made you upset and I am sorry for that. I was a little harsh but I simply do not understand the mind set of some people on this forum. Here we have the worst possible scenario where the car we all own can mysteriously catch on fire in our houses. I mean what on earth can be worse than that? And yet some folks rationalize it away with statistics as if can’t possibly happen to them because the magic eight ball told them so. Why is it so prevalent in human nature to think it always happens to the other guy? What Is the formula in probability and statistics that covers “I never though it would happen to me” when you get a diagnosis for terminal pancreatic cancer.
Numbers can only take you so far before real life come and kicks you in the butt.
So, again sorry.
We live in a world of dangerous things. Some of those things are of our own (human) creation.

I can see both sides of this, where statistically, this isn't a huge issue. However, the consequences are significant enough that it is worrisome. In terms of risk management, you need to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of an event happening. In this case, it's extremely unlikely, but it has significant consequences. As a result, the planning and response should probably be similar to a significant earthquake. Meaning, you shouldn't significantly alter your life in expectation that the event happens; however, you should make some basic, low-cost preparations. Yes, you could park outside, if your situation allows it. You could also make sure that you have proper detectors installed in your garage and automatic dialing to emergencies services. These are all things that we should probably have in place anyway, as (again, statistically) you are just as likely to experience a fire in your dryer's lint trap, an electrical fire from a faulty outlet, or a spontaneous fire from a pile of greasy rags (which is another common fire cause that's easily prevented by proper cleanup protocols).
 

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I've got a deal alert set for Nest Protect, which goes on sale for $60. It integrates with Google Home or Alexa, has an app to give remote notification, and does smoke and carbon monoxide. Lasts exactly 10 years. Requires WiFi connection. It does not tie into existing wired detectors.
Thanks, that would work perfectly for me. I just added a $20 Wi-Fi extender for the garage because my Juicebox charger kept dropping off the network for hours at a time.
 

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We live in a world of dangerous things. Some of those things are of our own (human) creation.

I can see both sides of this, where statistically, this isn't a huge issue. However, the consequences are significant enough that it is worrisome. In terms of risk management, you need to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of an event happening. In this case, it's extremely unlikely, but it has significant consequences. As a result, the planning and response should probably be similar to a significant earthquake. Meaning, you shouldn't significantly alter your life in expectation that the event happens; however, you should make some basic, low-cost preparations. Yes, you could park outside, if your situation allows it. You could also make sure that you have proper detectors installed in your garage and automatic dialing to emergencies services. These are all things that we should probably have in place anyway, as (again, statistically) you are just as likely to experience a fire in your dryer's lint trap, an electrical fire from a faulty outlet, or a spontaneous fire from a pile of greasy rags (which is another common fire cause that's easily prevented by proper cleanup protocols).
This is the crux of all the arguing here, I think. We can probably all agree that the stats are what they are and can accurately describe the probability of risk, assuming we have accurate information. What we can't and shouldn't agree on is how each of us chooses to respond to that risk. We all have different experiences and personalities which lead us to respond to each risk differently. I'm not sure why anyone would try and graft their own response to risk onto someone else; who cares if they respond differently than you do.

Personally, I am terrified of fire and have been since I was a kid. My whole life I both subconsciously and obsessively worry about fire risks in my home. However, my Bolt is parked in the garage because the information I have now presents a risk that is low enough in my mind where the benefit of having a clean, more rodent-free car outweighs the potential risk.
 

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Your problem for not putting your charger near the door, not mine.
I'm tempted to say that it's your problem for buying or building a house that has internal storage for an electric or gasoline vehicle that could burst into flames. My garage is separated from the house by a good 50 feet, so I'm not so worried about it.

... Here we have the worst possible scenario where the car we all own can mysteriously catch on fire in our houses. I mean what on earth can be worse than that?
That's what smoke alarms and insurance is for. They let you avoid the worst of these kinds of disasters and recover from them. There are plenty of other risks in life, including accidents and health risks, that you can never really recover from. I'd rate those as being quite a bit worse.
 

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I'm tempted to say that it's your problem for buying or building a house that has internal storage for an electric or gasoline vehicle that could burst into flames. My garage is separated from the house by a good 50 feet, so I'm not so worried about it.


That's what smoke alarms and insurance is for. They let you avoid the worst of these kinds of disasters and recover from them. There are plenty of other risks in life, including accidents and health risks, that you can never really recover from. I'd rate those as being quite a bit worse.
No, it’s not my problem because I am more than happy to park outside with any of my vehicles. I am not complaining if I have to do that. Your comment makes no sense what so ever.
I don’t know about you but I have possessions that are irreplaceable. If you think insurance is going to make you whole than maybe you should think again. Besides, a smoke detector or alarm does you no good when you are away from home.Look, I was only trying to make a suggestion based the the sudden and unpredictable nature of these car fires. Mostly what I see is a whole bunch of macho “don’t tell me what to do” sentiments. I am not trying to be right, just cautious. If you or anyone else here can’t see what I see than so be it.
Have you read the articles about all the Hyundai fires? Same battery. Have you read about BMW telling owners not to charge or use the battery portion of their hybrids?
It not like I’m suggesting people sell their Bolts or stop driving them. Simply consider parking them outside until a solution is found. If this does make sense to you or anyone else, well famous last words “ I never thought it would happen to me”
Such an easy solution to park outside (for most people). Sorry you can’t see the wisdom in that.
If your L2 cord doesn’t reach than get an extension cord and use the OEM with or without an adaptor.
But I guess I didn’t say that because I am an Idiot.
 

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No, it’s not my problem because I am more than happy to park outside with any of my vehicles. I am not complaining if I have to do that. Your comment makes no sense what so ever.
Fair enough. And other people are happy to park in their garages, so it's not a problem for them either.
I don’t know about you but I have possessions that are irreplaceable. If you think insurance is going to make you whole than maybe you should think again.
I completely understand the severity of a house that burns down. I was just taking aim at your comment "what could be worse than that". It's not at all difficult for me to imagine worse things.
But I guess I didn’t say that because I am an Idiot.
I apologize if anything I said suggested that I think you're an idiot. You just have a different opinion based on different perceptions of risk, nothing wrong with that.
 

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Yes, three fires in four years with 78,000 vehicles sold is a trend. It's a trend that we can expect nearly zero incidents. It's a trend that says it's more than an order of magnitude safer to park an EV in your garage than an ICE vehicle.
I agree in general, but I think two points are worth clarifying:
  1. I haven't seen any stats on ICE fires for vehicles parked in garages. I strongly suspect they're still much more common than EV fires, but in general, ICE fires are on vehicles that are on the roadway.
  2. If there are 3 reported fires, odds are pretty good there are some number that have gone unreported for one reason or another. Again, still pretty rare, but I wouldn't take 3/78,000 as gospel.
 

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I agree in general, but I think two points are worth clarifying:
  1. I haven't seen any stats on ICE fires for vehicles parked in garages. I strongly suspect they're still much more common than EV fires, but in general, ICE fires are on vehicles that are on the roadway.
  2. If there are 3 reported fires, odds are pretty good there are some number that have gone unreported for one reason or another. Again, still pretty rare, but I wouldn't take 3/78,000 as gospel.
Actually, BMW has been dealing with spontaneous ICEV fires for a few years now.

And they recently are having issues with their Samsung supplied cells on their hybrids.


I would have responded that if there's an EV fire, we would have heard about it since they are so rare they are news but skimming the BMW hybrid fire article, I would be wrong. I haven't heard about their hybrid fires. Maybe they are outside the US.
 

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I guess the moral of the story is that neither BMW nor Hyundai/Kia could make cars that does not spontaneous burst into flames.
 
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