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Any recommendations regarding buying a used vs. certified pre-owned Bolt? Anything to watch out for when buying a used 2017 LT? Thanks.
 

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This is a very good question. Basically if you could now if the prior user used hill top reserve, that is, if they did not regularly charge over 80%. That would be the first thing I would try to find out.
 

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This is a very good question. Basically if you could now if the prior user used hill top reserve, that is, if they did not regularly charge over 80%. That would be the first thing I would try to find out.
Can you explain? Is it better to not fully charge the battery?
 

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@Nacho you really should consider new! 10-12,000 off msrp and still time to get the $3,750 tax credit. If you choose LT trim, you're looking at a net purchase (after tax credit) of $25k. Not to mention the full warranty, roadside etc.
 

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Can you explain? Is it better to not fully charge the battery?
Yes, lithium cells are happiest between almost empty and almost full. Routinely leaving them totally full or empty for more than an hour is how to degrade them. (The stone-cold-empty-for-hours part is how my kids kill all my smart devices!) Also their happy temperature is your happy temperature (or maybe a little more--a reptile's happy temperature), but the Bolt's active temperature control for the battery takes care of that.

The fact that no one likes to go down to 0% on a daily basis and the fact that even at 0% the Bolt has some reserve (actually not at true 0%) means you don't have to worry too much about leaving it empty routinely or for very long.

So, all anyone has to worry about to maintain their battery is this: DON'T CHARGE TO FULL ROUTINELY. 60-80% is fine.

You can do it as rare exercise of capacity immediately before long trips. (I guess the BEV equivalent of driving hard at the beginning of life to seal the cylinders. Have you seen devices that say "charge to full, then discharge all the way" for their first one or 2 cycles? Follow that advice, then never top off or drain dead unless you have to.) And don't bother charging to 100% at pit stops on a trip: pulling out of the CCS at 80% minimizes your trip time because the last 20% of the charging takes 80% of the time.

Source:
 

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All I know was I bought used from Chevy dealer 2017 lt 2,200 miles but because it was a loaner I was very surprised to see 102,200 & 8 year battery pack warranty! so I believe the extra warranty and cash from GM is the difference. It's called GM DRAC program car. Google search "gm drac program car discount" and You'll see many results pop up.
 

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By design with it's BMS (Battery Management System) you can neither run the Bolt's traction battery too low or charge it too high to damage it's cells.

Heat is the enemy here as with most battery chemistries.. if you repeatedly charge or discharge it too fast it can lead to permanent loss of capacity. Again, the BMS protects the battery from both, but it is suspected that constant use of DC Fast Charge vs. L2 charging can lead to some slight loss of capacity over time.
 

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"Certified pre-owned" is generally an extended warranty, and like all extended warranties, is meant to boost profits.

A used vehicle carries over the original warranty, even if purchased private party.

Purchasing new probably is the best financial move at the moment (this month only) since there's heavy discounting, federal tax credit, and possible local incentives.

I probably wouldn't purchase used unless it was offered for $16k (depending on trim), which is unlikely. My preference is always to purchase private party for used vehicles since you can talk with the owner and get details about the vehicle, unlike when you purchase used from a dealer. They don't know anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@Nacho you really should consider new! 10-12,000 off msrp and still time to get the $3,750 tax credit. If you choose LT trim, you're looking at a net purchase (after tax credit) of $25k. Not to mention the full warranty, roadside etc.
Thanks for all the great info. As for buying new, the federal tax credit has little benefit to me since I usually get a refund. The best new out the door price I’ve seen is $28,500 before taxes in WA. I’ve found a 2017 certified with 62,000 miles for $20k out the door. Seems like the way to go as I can barely afford this car.
 

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Thanks for all the great info. As for buying new, the federal tax credit has little benefit to me since I usually get a refund. The best new out the door price I’ve seen is $28,500 before taxes in WA. I’ve found a 2017 certified with 62,000 miles for $20k out the door. Seems like the way to go as I can barely afford this car.
Just to be clear, the amount you pay or get back when filing your Federal taxes is not the same as your total tax liability. If you can afford a new car, I almost guarantee you have at least $3750 in tax liability. That is to say, whatever amount of taxes you're expecting to get back when you file would be roughly $3750 more than that.
 

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Just to be clear, the amount you pay or get back when filing your Federal taxes is not the same as your total tax liability. If you can afford a new car, I almost guarantee you have at least $3750 in tax liability. That is to say, whatever amount of taxes you're expecting to get back when you file would be roughly $3750 more than that.
I seem to be easily confused by the federal tax credit. So if I get a tax refund for withholding, the credit will be added to that, right? In other words, I’m guaranteed the credit as long as my tax liability before subtracting withholding is more than the credit amount?
 

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Yes. Think of the tax credit as the same as a friend stepping up and paying something toward your tax obligation, resulting in a greater refund after you calculate your actual tax liability. Same math.
 

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"Certified pre-owned" is generally an extended warranty, and like all extended warranties, is meant to boost profits.

A used vehicle carries over the original warranty, even if purchased private party.

Purchasing new probably is the best financial move at the moment (this month only) since there's heavy discounting, federal tax credit, and possible local incentives.

I probably wouldn't purchase used unless it was offered for $16k (depending on trim), which is unlikely. My preference is always to purchase private party for used vehicles since you can talk with the owner and get details about the vehicle, unlike when you purchase used from a dealer. They don't know anything.
Okay I’m starting to see the light for buying new. At $24,500 including the federal incentive, it’s $4000 more than a 2017 certified with 62,000 miles. $4k is a lot for me, but probably worth it, right??
 

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You also get the full 3 year/36K warranty with the new 2019, a 2017 with 62K miles has the warranty all expired and probably needs or will soon need new tires too...
 

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When buying a car, I try to consider all possible costs.

If new, the added cost of the principle, plus interest if financing, plus the cost of fully insuring the vehicle over the life of the loan.

If used, the added cost of having the vehicle inspected prior to purchase, the reduced/expired warranties that apply to the parts of the vehicle, the lower cost of the vehicle as compared to new, and the savings due to not having to fully insure the vehicle.

I bought my 2017 used at 44K miles for $23K out the door (CA taxes & reg included). Since I'm not fully insuring the vehicle, I decided to take the hit on the bumper to bumper warranty as it passed the pre-purchase inspection. It ultimately all boils down to what your priorities are. I have a bit of a grudge against GM because of what they did in 2008, so that pushed me away from buying new. I love the car, just not the company.

Also, be aware that just because it's a CPO, doesn't mean it comes inspected and clean. Always perform your own inspection with someone you trust. Although in this case, the people you may find that know about this car will be pretty limited. Good luck!
 

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Okay I’m starting to see the light for buying new. At $24,500 including the federal incentive, it’s $4000 more than a 2017 certified with 62,000 miles. $4k is a lot for me, but probably worth it, right??
and an additional $4,000 on a 36 to 60 month loan won't be that much on your monthly payment.
 

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CPO's cost more! They should have a better interest rate, as far as USED cars go.
CPO's have a set inspection and must meet requirements that others won't pass.
Tires need to be a minimum tread depth. Body damage can not be larger than a quarter
sized dent. Mileage will also play into it. Most stop @ 75K miles for CPO's.


CPO's are somewhat better, but they are way more expensive overall.
IMO, the new car with it's discounts and incentives will win out every time! YMMV!
 
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