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So the average US household uses 900 kwh/month, equals 30kwh/day. I don't know where you learned arithmetic, but where I learned it, 60kwh divided by 30kwh = 2 days, not 5-1/2.

In a power emergency, someone who continues to use their daily average (30 kWh) doesn't understand the meaning of "emergency". I can easily get my usage down to <10kWh per day by shutting down all non-vital loads. Most refrigerators use ~2-3kWh per day. That, a couple of LED lamps, a cell-phone charger and intermittent microwave oven (and, perhaps, sump pump) use should see you through almost a week.
 

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So the average US household uses 900 kwh/month, equals 30kwh/day. I don't know where you learned arithmetic, but where I learned it, 60kwh divided by 30kwh = 2 days, not 5-1/2.
That's more than twice the amount I use in a 2100 sq/ft 4 bed house, including plugging in the Prius (3 kWh battery). Then again, I have gas heat and water, and barely cool.

People would use less than this if the power was out and their priority was to spend their reserve energy wisely.
 

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That's more than twice the amount I use in a 2100 sq/ft 4 bed house, including plugging in the Prius (3 kWh battery). Then again, I have gas heat and water, and barely cool.

People would use less ..(kWh).. if the power was out and their priority was to spend their reserve energy wisely.
People would use more if their source was renewable energy. All the to and fro about how much energy we use is because of the cost of fossil fuels or the cost of electricity, global warming, or all of these things. If you use solar at home, you have an incentive to not have to worry about your usage. This is a good thing. Despite the solar on my roof, I still run around the house turning lights off, even though all my lights are LED of CFL. Its become habit, but totally irrelevant with solar on my roof. I can't wait for energy to be less expensive, renewable energy. Already, wind energy is less expensive than many other sources, and in the long run so is solar.
 

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In a power emergency, someone who continues to use their daily average (30 kWh) doesn't understand the meaning of "emergency". I can easily get my usage down to <10kWh per day by shutting down all non-vital loads. Most refrigerators use ~2-3kWh per day. That, a couple of LED lamps, a cell-phone charger and intermittent microwave oven (and, perhaps, sump pump) use should see you through almost a week.
Right, and if your backup power can provide the amount of energy that you normally use in a day, than an "emergency" becomes a non-emergency. Personally, I don't like to be thrust into an emergency by the weather and power companies, and have to live like a hermit for some period of time as a result. Forget that.
 

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That's more than twice the amount I use in a 2100 sq/ft 4 bed house, including plugging in the Prius (3 kWh battery). Then again, I have gas heat and water, and barely cool.

People would use less than this if the power was out and their priority was to spend their reserve energy wisely.
We averaged 798 kWh/month in 2018, driving our Bolt 1000 miles a month, my bicycles 600 miles a month, our lawnmower, weed whip, chainsaw, and heating in fall and spring with our AC/heat pump. Winter heat is mostly gas, as is our cooking, and tankless hot water heater. We don't suffer. We keep it 72 F in winter, and 74 F in summer. In theory, our electric is coming from our coops new solar farm, but in reality it just feeds into our local grid, much of which is atomic power.
 

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People would use more if their source was renewable energy. All the to and fro about how much energy we use is because of the cost of fossil fuels or the cost of electricity, global warming, or all of these things. If you use solar at home, you have an incentive to not have to worry about your usage. This is a good thing. Despite the solar on my roof, I still run around the house turning lights off, even though all my lights are LED of CFL. Its become habit, but totally irrelevant with solar on my roof. I can't wait for energy to be less expensive, renewable energy. Already, wind energy is less expensive than many other sources, and in the long run so is solar.
Again, that might be how you respond to things (though your examples of minding miniscule amounts of power waste suggests the opposite). If I had PV, I'd be even more concerned about power consumption because I wouldn't want to pay to install more PV than necessary. As it is, electricity is 8 cents per kWh here, which provides little incentive to conserve. Efficiency and waste reduction happens to be an interest of mine though, so my conservation mindset is less economically motivated than most other people.

As a whole population, people tend to respond to economic motivations more than anything else. If electricity were to drop in price, we'd be more likely to use more of it.

If wind and solar were cheaper than conventional sources, my utility would send me a letter asking if I would opt in to pay less for wind and solar power. As it is, they ask just the opposite. Perhaps it's cheaper for some locations, but it isn't a generally true statement. Cue comments about not factoring in the "true" cost of conventional electricity production... now.
 

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We averaged 798 kWh/month in 2018, driving our Bolt 1000 miles a month, my bicycles 600 miles a month, our lawnmower, weed whip, chainsaw, and heating in fall and spring with our AC/heat pump. Winter heat is mostly gas, as is our cooking, and tankless hot water heater. We don't suffer. We keep it 72 F in winter, and 74 F in summer. In theory, our electric is coming from our coops new solar farm, but in reality it just feeds into our local grid, much of which is atomic power.
Ah, but you are supplementing with fossil fuels.... oh dear. Better fix that. On the actual amount of energy any house burns, it is so dependent on local conditions, heat in winter, A/C in summer, humidity, whether or not you are out at work all day, and so on, that the number itself is not very relevant unless qualified by confounding factors. Any attempt to claim some sainthood by reporting the burning of fewer kWh is therefore shrouded in a cloud of uncertainty and questions. Its like body mass index, you need a number to account for all the factors, and even then we end up arguing about it.

The idea of a co-op solar farm is magical in my view. Is it grid connected? Anyhow, I think some electricity companies are coming up with objections. Concerning roof solar, one interesting thought is that any excess solar you might generate from your roof in the day time s actually going primarily to your neighbors - path of least resistance. So, you are benefiting your neighbor by burning less fossil fuel and feeding them with renewable energy. Of course, you suck in some less clean electricity at night, but it balances out.
 

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Whatever inverter you decide to buy, you might want to get it soon. If the tariffs go into effect in July, everything you touch will get a lot more expensive.
I ended up ordering a Samlex PST-1000-12 inverter on June 6th due to the threat of tarrifs on Chinese goods. I wasn't able to test my setup until today (long story which I'll write about another time). Turns out, the inverter is made in Taiwan, not China, so it wouldn't have been affected. Can't speak to all Samlex inverters coming from Taiwan or not...

I clamped the negative cable to the stud near the APM that the manual points to for jump starting (p. 307 of my '19 manual).

I ran my setup for more than an hour and confirmed it was enough to start my fridge (multiple times) and keep it running w/o issue (I'd set my fridge to pretty cold, waited many minutes for all the compressor-related relay clicking to stop and had it run for over 40 minutes) along w/some lights + a laptop.

What are the ways to prevent the 1 or 2 hour auto-shutdown? (My testing was just in P w/parking brake on.) There was a comment in another thread which I asked about re: broomstick through the window (https://www.chevybolt.org/forum/10-technical-discussion/17722-camping-mode-test-results-4.html#post510145). I don't get that.

Without the broomstick, it sounds like you need put the car in READY mode then exit from the passenger side but you need to be in neutral or L??? I'd rather leave in N w/the parking brake on. For safety reasons, I'd REALLY rather leave it in park, but that might not be possible due to GM's decisions...

I recall people have left it in neutral, exiting from the passenger side and it's stayed on for hours, right? If the parking brake is applied, does it stay applied? In N w/parking brake on, exiting thru the passenger side, the car still stays on for many hours, right? I'd hate to be in an extended outage, go to sleep and wake up to find my 12 volt flat due to the car powering itself off.

Nobody's ever found it auto-shifting to D, right? That would be VERY bad. Car will be in my garage during an outage.
 

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If you needed to run a 3phase lathe maybe
Now you're getting me hot and bothered. If I had someway to tell that thing the voltage and frequency I wanted, it would be such a great power source for my table saw, that I'd have to run out an buy a bunch more three-phase tools. Of course, then I wouldn't have anywhere to park the car. Details.
 

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Our electricity is down due to California winds, but my Bolt has come to the rescue. Once again our e-utility shut off our power, this time for almost two days, yet no food has gone bad and we have Internet access. This thanks to suggestions on this thread. By attaching an inverter to the 12v battery, turning on the car, leaving it in neutral gear, sliding out the passenger door, and running extension cords into the house, I've powered key functions for 20 hours. It's only drained energy from the Bolt at the rate of a mile for each hour of house use, which means in theory that I could keep my minimum functions going for over 200 hours. What a relief given that the utility is threatening to make this a frequent event for the next 10-15 years. The inverter, BTW, is the Power Inverter Pure Sine Wave 1200Watt 12V DC to 110V 120V with Remote Control Dual AC Outlets and USB Port for CPAP RV Car Solar System Emergency (it's Amazon title). I connected it to the car using short jumper cables as the provided cables aren't readily attached.
 

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(sort of) cross-posting.

There's another thread on this topic, which also contains links to other threads on this topic. So, FYI :

 

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"The 2AWG ground feed be attached to the vehicle grounding lug"... I thought the 2AWG is for the plus and minus of the battery to go to the plus and minus to the inverter, as the inverter has its own grounding connector and comes with a wire for it?
AFAIK, the grounding of the inverter is to provide protection downstream from it, so the ground conductor should be sized based on the amperage of AC output of the inverter, not the DC input (so, about 1/10th of the amperage). If you're using the AC power outside of the vehicle, a person touching the equipment plugged into the inverter may be in contact with the real ground (the planet) and not inside a car that rides on rubber tires. In those circumstances, a chasis ground to a vehicle that is only in contact with the ground through rubber tires, provides little protection and you'll want a ground that is hammered into the actual ground or a connection to a building's grounding (ask an electrician, but I think that's somewhat safe, at least when the house has no grid power).
 

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Am doing this, just to good not to try. I have an inverter spec out on amazon and am waiting until around black friday to see if a good deal comes around. From all I've read, am figuring that the bolt charges the 12v battery as needed when in accessory mode, that only makes sense. So if you connect an inverter to the 12v battery and not draw more than say 1.4 kw, I suspect the Bolts 12v dc charger should keep the 12v battery charged while having emergency AC power for a refrigerator when the power goes out. Am definitely going to try this ;) Of course, I'll keep and eye on it as not to drain the battery. If accessory mode does charge the 12v battery then I suspect it will when it's on. Has anyone try this already?
 

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If accessory mode does charge the 12v battery then I suspect it will when it's on.
I left my car in accessory mode at an electric car week show and it triggered the battery saving mode. So guessing you will not see any charging of the 12V battery because the traction battery's relay is not pulled in. Other's have resorted to leaving the car running.
 

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[QUOTE="Dougout, post: 507495, member: 3207]
For solar consider an SMA inverter with their Secure Power Supply (SPS). AFAIK, this is the only inverter company that allows you to draw power from your solar when the grid is down - unless you have hardwired battery backup to your solar, which is not the focus of this great thread.

The SPS is a cheap add on to the inverter, your solar installer should know about it. It’s a standard 110 vac receptacle, and it allows you to draw up to 2000 watts, meaning up to what your panels are producing, with a max of 2000w. The receptacle works only when the grid is down (or when you turn off your solar circuit breaker for testing).

During an extended outage, I can charge my Bolt during the day, 5 hrs at 2000w on a good day, and I can refill the big battery at 10 kWh/day (maybe 9 after losses). That’s far from 60, but it’ll keep the Sierra Nevada IPA cold indefinitely.
[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the great idea. We have 49 solar panels feeding two SMA inverters both of which are now equipped with SPS outlets. I can use one to power the house heating system (natural gas fired hot water) and the other to recharge a recently acquired Bolt EV. I am also planning on installing a 1200 watt inverter connected to the Bolt battery to be able to keep the house warm at night.
 

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... I am also planning on installing a 1200 watt inverter connected to the Bolt battery to be able to keep the house warm at night.
Try to make sure it's a true sine wave inverter, modern heating equipment are literally computer controlled devices and will die a quick death on a crap simulated AC waveform. Even the new ECM circulator pumps on baseboard systems will be damaged by a poor simulated sine wave.
 
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