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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apologies if this has already been answered somewhere (if so, please share the link). I recently purchased a used 2017 Bolt, which only has the J1772 port (does not have the two additional sockets below, which I believe enable CCS1 DC charging). From the layman鈥檚 perspective, it appears that the top part of a CCS1 EVSE is identical to a J1772 EVSE, with the only difference being the two DC ports in the oval portion of the CCS1 charger.

So is it possible to use a DC fast charging station with a CCS1 outlet with my non-DC Bolt? My hunch is no, because, when I went to plug in, the two bottom prongs on the CCS1 would get in the way. If that鈥檚 true, is there an adapter to covert CCS1 to J1772, which would transmit energy through the top/circular portion of the charging port, and not through the bottom/oval portion of the port (sort of like the adapters you can buy for a grounded three-prong 120v plug that enables you plug into an old-school outlet without a ground port)?

I realize that this would reduce the charging speed to level 2 rates, but in a pinch, would open a wider range of charging options. Case and point: this weekend we visited some friends that are about 120 miles away. We brought our ICE vehicle because the round trip was just over the max of the Bolt鈥檚 range (especially with highway driving). Level one charging wouldn鈥檛 have added enough range because we were only there for a few hours, but level two charging would have made it possible. Low and behold, there was a charging station a few blocks from their house, but it was DC fast charging with a CCS1 port that (I believe) won鈥檛 work with our Bolt. If we had a CCS1 to J1772 adapter (or some other workaround), would could have used the charging station as a level-2 charging station and brought our Bolt instead of our ICE vehicle. Maybe?

I realize this might violate charging station etiquette, as I would have been parked at a DC fast charging station for much longer than it is typically used for. In this case there were multiple charging stations in a row, so I wouldn鈥檛 be blocking someone from the one and only charger.

I鈥檒l also note that I purchased the car assuming that I鈥檇 only be able to use level 1 and 2 charging. That鈥檚 fine, as it鈥檚 primarily used as my daily driver on my 80mi round trip commute, and because our second car is an ICE vehicle that we planned to continued using on longer trips. For us, the savings for the non-DC Bolt were worth it, and by the time our ICE vehicle needs replacing, we might be inclined to go electric with both cars.
 

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So is it possible to use a DC fast charging station with a CCS1 outlet with my non-DC Bolt?
No. Absolutely not possible. The CCS plug has the ground contact, and the two signal pins from the J1172, but the AC contacts are not there. There is no path for the DC power from the DC fast charger to the onboard charger of your Bolt. This is a very good thing, as the 400 VDC would blow it through the hood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No. Absolutely not possible. The CCS plug has the ground contact, and the two signal pins from the J1172, but the AC contacts are not there. There is no path for the DC power from the DC fast charger to the onboard charger of your Bolt. This is a very good thing, as the 400 VDC would blow it through the hood.
So for my own curiosity, it sounds like when you are using dcfc, all of the electrical energy is being fed though the bottom two prongs of a CSS1, and that it is 100% DC current. And that no AC current is going through the top part of the plug, as it normally would with a level-2 setup?
 

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DC chargers provide only DC to the vehicle, they do not provide AC power. Your vehicle is not equipped to accept DC power, it can only accept AC power which it then processes to DC itself.

The vehicle you purchased is not at all capable of using DCFC.
 

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So for my own curiosity, it sounds like when you are using dcfc, all of the electrical energy is being fed though the bottom two prongs of a CSS1, and that it is 100% DC current. And that no AC current is going through the top part of the plug, as it normally would with a level-2 setup?
The two pins at the top of the J1772 carry AC current. Technically, the standard allows DC current on these as well, but nobody has implemented that.
35655


On CCS, DC current is carried on the two lower pins, the two AC current pins are not used at all. The three lower pins on the J1772 part of the plug continue to perform similar functions, Control, Ground, and Proximity. Control is enhanced in DCFC to allow the car to communicate with the supply equipment, things like SoC in addition to the variable current demands. Proximity is effectively a cutoff switch, when you press the lever on the handle of a charger, it opens the circuit on the proximity sensor, this in turn cuts off power to the car and eliminates the chance of arching.

35656

Even if you tried building an adapter, the DC current would need to be converted to AC using an inverter, and power would be limited to what a L2 charger could provide as the car's onboard inverter would limit input. Such a solution would be impractical, with so many L2 public charge points available, and the cost of an inverter in the plug, it wouldn't make any sense.

So, bottom line, you cannot use CCS1 DC chargers unless your car has DCFC capability, and adding it after the fact is not practical either. The cost of adding DCFC to your car would probably exceed the cost of swapping for a DCFC capable model, if it even could be done.
 
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Apologies if this has already been answered somewhere (if so, please share the link).
It's definitely not the first time that this question has come up in the forums. Like this thread.

In a slight twist, you were asking about the possibility of using some sort of CCS1-to-J1772 adapter to get around the problem. Unfortunately, the posts above have thoroughly debunked it.

Now, some people have wondered if a non-CCS Bolt EV's port cound be modified to enable DCFC.

A real professional has attempted it and failed because of underlying technical issues that hinder such modifications.

Another thread is much longer, but does have a Facebook link near the end to a group that claims to have successfully done the modification.

So I suppose it might be technically possible, but probably not anywhere near cost effective.
 

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I too am having the same problem with having a Rav4 prime with the J1772 plug, but only CCS1/2 stations near me. Tesla just announced they're releasing an adapter to convert CCS1 to the Tesla plug. Could 1 use this adapter, along with a Tesla female to J1772 male adapter, to essentially convert the CCS1 to J1772?

I dont want to be the 1st to try it with a new $55k vehicle, & I dont really want to spend $400 on adapters, but am wondering if this is an option.
 

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Nope.

AC vs DC. J1772 is AC and vehicles feed that through the onboard inverter. CCS and Tesla Supercharger are DC which feeds directly into the battery.

These adapters are passive devices, they don't convert DC to AC.
 
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