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@dislagogreen : Since you're trying to figure out all this and perhaps finding incorrect options, I really would go back to TFPDrive's excellent suggestion a while ago about just getting a proper 32A L2 charging station that has the 50A plug to go into your 50A receptacle already there. Plug and play. Much easier than trying to figure it all out.
Electricity is serious business. For your safety, the safety of others, the safety of your single family detached dwelling, the safety of your multi-family dwelling, the safety of people possibly attempting to plug things in to the wrong plug.
There have been many threads made here of people finding all kinds of different options.
The cheap DIY method is to buy the blank 5-15 receptacle to connect a cable into. Then the blank 14-50 plug to connect the same cable into. Then about a foot of 12ga 2/1 (maybe 3/1) cable. Wire it all up as per any of the various threads around here. Baddabing one EVSE adapter. Plug your OEM EVSE into the 5-15 receptacle. Plug the 14-50 plug into your garage receptacle. Charge at twice the speed as at 120V 12A.
The non-code compliant part of the adapter is running two 120V hots through a 5-15 receptacle that is only intended to have one hot.
That and that the brick is not UL certified for 240V.
 

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@dislagogreen : Since you're trying to figure out all this and perhaps finding incorrect options, I really would go back to TFPDrive's excellent suggestion a while ago about just getting a proper 32A L2 charging station that has the 50A plug to go into your 50A receptacle already there. Plug and play. Much easier than trying to figure it all out.
Electricity is serious business. For your safety, the safety of others, the safety of your single family detached dwelling, the safety of your multi-family dwelling, the safety of people possibly attempting to plug things in to the wrong plug.
There have been many threads made here of people finding all kinds of different options.
The cheap DIY method is to buy the blank 5-15 receptacle to connect a cable into. Then the blank 14-50 plug to connect the same cable into. Then about a foot of 12ga 2/1 (maybe 3/1) cable. Wire it all up as per any of the various threads around here. Baddabing one EVSE adapter. Plug your OEM EVSE into the 5-15 receptacle. Plug the 14-50 plug into your garage receptacle. Charge at twice the speed as at 120V 12A.
The non-code compliant part of the adapter is running two 120V hots through a 5-15 receptacle that is only intended to have one hot.
That and that the brick is not UL certified for 240V.
I do understand it, and probably spending $500 on a L2 Station is worth it in the long term, but my thing is - the Bolt lease is not permanent, and, say, Tesla would be fine with plugging in into my 14-50 outlet.
 

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Thank you, much appreciated!
how's this though - looks like it does it all in a compact package:
 

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You are being fooled by the visual on the 6-50R. They are a completely different size than a 5-15 or 5-20. Try plugging in a 120V item in a dryer socket to see the size difference.

There is no single direct adapter from a 14-50 to a 5-15/5-20. 14 series units are designed for 250/125V while 5-15 is 125V only. It's one of the reasons the Grow light 6-15 (which is also 250V only) to 5-15/5-20 is really the magic adapter in this discussion because it delivers 250V on a 125V socket.

You will need to return the 14-50 to 6-50 adapter. It's not going to help you. Check out the adapters on the first page of this thread to see how it's done.

ga2500ev
this one seems to be exactly it though: AC WORKS 4-Prong 220-Volt Plug to 120-Volt 15/ 20Amp Household Female Adapter Cord (4-Prong 14-50 Outlet to Household) - - Amazon.com
 

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That will output 120v. A 14-50 is a dual 120/240 outlet and most adapters you find will just tap off of the 120 to create a standard 120 outlet.

An adapter that allows 240v through a NEMA 5 outlet is not going to be easy to find because it's not supposed to exist. It is technically a safety hazard, if someone tries plugging a space heater in to one they will burn the house down. Anything you find on Amazon will almost certainly not do what you want it to.
 

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.... Baddabing one EVSE adapter. Plug your OEM EVSE into the [Now Dangerous] 5-15 receptacle. ...
The non-code compliant part of the adapter is running two 120V hots through a 5-15 receptacle that is only intended to have one hot.
That and that the brick is not UL certified for 240V.
And make sure that no one else in your household will ever plug in a shop vac or a fan or anything that is designed for a typical 120V outlet.
How are you going to do that?

Standards and Codes are there for a reason.


Just open that dusty old billfold and do it the right way. :cautious:
If you can afford a Bolt, you can afford a safe and proper L2.
 
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And make sure that no one else in your household will ever plug in a shop vac or a fan or anything that is designed for a typical 120V outlet.
How are you going to do that?

Standards and Codes are there for a reason.


Just open that dusty old billfold and do it the right way. :cautious:
If you can afford a Bolt, you can afford a safe and proper L2.
Sigh. I did get the Bolt for free though :)... no joke.
I really appreciate your help and guidance and certainly get the risks involved with someone trying to use that outlet for 120V appliances. I'll mark it accordingly. It looks like there's nothing better than this combo, after all:
31087
 

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When you get it then pull out your continuity tester and see if both sides of the big plug come out to both sides of the output side of the little plug. Nowhere else.
 

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When you get it then pull out your continuity tester and see if both sides of the big plug come out to both sides of the output side of the little plug. Nowhere else.
Thank you, I will now look up "continuity tester" :sneaky:. I also found and ordered the other 6-20 to 5-15 on eBay, don't like this idea of a "universal adapter", they usually fit poorly and aren't tight enough, for this purpose
31088
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As said, that will only get you 120V. There's several options, the my240 that I recommend to most is still shutdown due to C19. There's a parkworld one where you have to make sure you get the right one that has 250 output but you have to hack off the neutral prong to work in a 14-50. This one has 17 in stock from amazon but is pricey.
 

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As said, that will only get you 120V. There's several options, the my240 that I recommend to most is still shutdown due to C19. There's a parkworld one where you have to make sure you get the right one that has 250 output but you have to hack off the neutral prong to work in a 14-50. This one has 17 in stock from amazon but is pricey.
yes, thank you. Someone pointed it out, I canceled this one.
 

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No. This one:
how's this though - looks like it does it all in a compact package:
No it won't. I know that this has been frustrating for you because of the logic. Here's the key point you must always keep in mind: very few adapters will take a 250V input and deliver that 250V input to a 5 series socket because the 5 series is designed for 125V.

A 14 series receptacle has 4 wires: L1,L2,N, and G. The L1 and L2 are hot lines with split phase 250V. This means that they both go from 0 to 125V relative to ground and 0 - 250V relative to each other. N is neutral. It's 0V relative to ground and designed to carry power relative to L1 and L2. G is ground an is the 0V ground reference always. Technically it's a safety ground designed to only carry current in a fault situation.

Now a 5 series has L1,N, and G. Note there is no L2. Because of this there's only 125V available on a 5 series socket.

The adapter you have shown connects the L1,N, and G from the 14-50 to the L1, N, and G of the 5-15. Note that since there's no wiring for L2, that the 5-15 socket doesn't have 250 V.

The 6-15 to 5-15 adapter we have shown you is the special one. It wires L1,L2, and G of the 6-15 to L1, 'N', and G on the 5-15. Since L1 and L2 are both wired, and N is not, this delivers 250V to the 5-15 socket, which is the goal.

The key difference between the 14 series and the 6 series is that the 6 series doesn't have a neutral. Because of this, 6 series adapters to 5 series cannot "convert" the 250V input of the 6 series to 125V output for the 5 series. But since the 14 series has a neutral, any single adapter between a 14 series plug and a 5 series socket will invariably wire the neutral converting the 250V input into a 125V output.

You need to understand that putting 250V on a 125V socket is a fault condition. Virtually no one will sell an adapter that does that. If someone ignorant plugs in a 125V device into a 250V socket, it releases the magic smoke and the device no longer works. In general no one wants to sell something like that.

So get the magic 6-15 to 5-15 adapter, which is like the only commercial device any of us has ever seen that actually puts 250V on a 5-15 socket and then work from there.

ga2500ev
 

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This is the one I've been using for quite a while. They used to sell it on Amazon but it is now out of stock.
Indeed. Thanks to the earlier post showing the part's name, I could locate it on Amazon (as out of stock), then used the entire string to search for it on eBay, et voila!
 

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And make sure that no one else in your household will ever plug in a shop vac or a fan or anything that is designed for a typical 120V outlet.
How are you going to do that?

Standards and Codes are there for a reason.


Just open that dusty old billfold and do it the right way. :cautious:
If you can afford a Bolt, you can afford a safe and proper L2.
I generally agree that standards and codes need to be followed. This is especially true for any permanently attached fixtures to a building.

OTOH the 6-15 to 5-15 adapter essentially converts the EVSE to a 6-15 device. So, even if the 14-50 to 6-20/6-15 cable is attached to the house, no one can plug a 125V 5-15 device into it.

Personally, I get slightly annoyed at the calls to waste a perfectly good EVSE that comes with the vehicle simply because it isn't labeled for 250V use and comes with the standard connector. When a $30 adapter doubles its speed and makes for a perfectly capable charge cable, if it serves the purpose, why spend extra?

ga2500ev
 

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.....When a $30 adapter doubles its speed and makes for a perfectly capable charge cable, if it serves the purpose, why spend extra?
The stock gives you 2.8 kW of charging with this potentially dangerous outlet lurking in your house.
Not perfect....:cautious:
Versus 7.2 kW of charging if you spend ~ $300 for a 32A L2, (and have a 40A 240V outlet ready.)
Perfect ! (y)

To each, his own....
 

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The stock gives you 2.8 kW of charging with this potentially dangerous outlet lurking in your house.
Not perfect....:cautious:
Versus 7.2 kW of charging if you spend ~ $300 for a 32A L2, (and have a 40A 240V outlet ready.)
Perfect ! (y)

To each, his own....
Agreed, in my case, I built an adapter for a backup solution. With a 130 mile commute, I need 20-30kW daily to keep up. I have had one time when my 30A EVSE failed to charge and that day was a real hassle given limited L3 in the area. So, a backup alternative at least enables me to buy time to get a replacement unit should my primary fail. 2.88kW is generally enough to keep up with my commute, but I agree it is not my preferred choice.
 

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The stock gives you 2.8 kW of charging with this potentially dangerous outlet lurking in your house.
Not perfect....:cautious:
Versus 7.2 kW of charging if you spend ~ $300 for a 32A L2, (and have a 40A 240V outlet ready.)
Perfect ! (y)

To each, his own....
2.8 kW is perfectly capable. Just because it isn't the maximum available charging power doesn't mean that it isn't a capable unit.

What dangerous outlet? The setup has 4 components:
1. A 14-50 receptacle on the wall.
2. A 14-50 to 6-20 adapter cable.
3. A 6-20 to 5-20/5-15 adapter
4. The EVSE itself

It's doubtful that anyone who doesn't know what's going on with that unit would unplug the EVSE from its adapter. All other interfaces are 240V interfaces. If someone really was paranoid, all they would have to do is remove the 6-20 to 5-20/5-15 adapter from the scene. Then the outlet is completely unusable to 125V plugs.

I just don't understand why manufacturers give an EVSE with the unit that many think is unusable. They should offer a 240V 24A to 32A unit with the EV that can reduced to [email protected] using an adapter. I just think it's wasteful not to use the EVSE that comes with the car and insisting that everyone purchase a separate EVSE.

ga2500ev
 

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Agreed, in my case, I built an adapter for a backup solution. With a 130 mile commute, I need 20-30kW daily to keep up. I have had one time when my 30A EVSE failed to charge and that day was a real hassle given limited L3 in the area. So, a backup alternative at least enables me to buy time to get a replacement unit should my primary fail. 2.88kW is generally enough to keep up with my commute, but I agree it is not my preferred choice.
A 130 mile commute is like in the 99th percentile of commutes. It's a mistake to take an outlier such as that and normalize it. That's how we get folks who have a 7 mile commute thinking that they need a full blown 32A EVSE installed.

ga2500ev
 

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