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PSEG Long Island loves my Bolt...
They charge me 23 cents/kWh (no EV plans available from PSEG LI) 24/7 to charge it... no questions asked!
 

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Makes sense to me, as there are several ways that EVs help stabilize the grid and bring costs down.

The big problem with electricity production is that it must precisely match demand every moment. If demand goes up too quickly before production can respond, you get brownouts, which is a reduction in voltage. Brownouts can damage sensitive electronics or motors. The opposite problem where demand drops off more rapidly than the utility can respond results in power being shunted to ground, essentially wasting the oversupply to keep the voltage from surging and causing damage.

To prevent brownouts, utilities must build enough power generation capability that it can supply energy during peak demand, often late afternoon on hot summer days when air conditioning is needed. This extra "peaking" capacity is less efficient at making electricity than the base load (minimum electricity demand) generators. Since the peaking generators are used much less frequently, they represent a huge expense compared to the relatively small amount of electricity they produce.

Here's where EVs help this situation now. They are often charged at night, during off-peak hours. If demand for off-peak, base load power goes up, then more of those efficient generators will need to be built. That helps to reduce the gap between the minimum load and maximum load. This means fewer of the expensive peaking generators will need to be built.

EVs have several potential ways to further stabilize the grid. A pilot study was already conducted between BMW and PG&E. Volunteers gave the utility the ability to delay charging up to 1 hr during peak demand. To take this concept further, EV owners could be given an incentive to participate in delayed or scheduled charging. Owners could define a charging window, say 10pm-6am, and the number of hours needed to charge the vehicle. The utility could then adjust the time(s) the car charges based on optimizing the grid.

Taken a big step further, EVs could become power sources during peak electricity demand. Owners could be incentivized to leave their EV connected to the grid to provide power during peak consumption. It could be setup that owners have to opt in to accept a request for power, that way they are never surprised to find their vehicle with a lower charge than they anticipated. The vehicle can be given credit for supplying expensive peak electricity, and then recharge on cheap off-peak electricity.

Finally, EVs could be used as a way to capture excess renewable energy. Utilities could issue a charge command when there is an abundance of renewable power generation, or issue a supply command when there is insufficient supply of renewable energy. The variability of both renewable energy production, and customer demand is the biggest hurdle to making it economically viable.
 

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PSEG Long Island loves my Bolt...
They charge me 23 cents/kWh (no EV plans available from PSEG LI) 24/7 to charge it... no questions asked!
Yes, I see they signed this letter. We keep hearing that a simplified customer-friendly off-peak rate plan is in the works, but it’s been in the works for years now, and nothing ever gets approved, despite NY’s stated objective to encourage EV use.

Talk is cheap. On Long Island it’s a lot cheaper than electricity.
 
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Right. Time-of-use makes so much sense, esp. with the option of charging EV's off peak hours. I really don't understand why utility companies aren't moving in that direction at a faster pace.
 

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Right. Time-of-use makes so much sense, esp. with the option of charging EV's off peak hours. I really don't understand why utility companies aren't moving in that direction at a faster pace.
If your peak demand is higher than what you can produce, you come up with incentives like TOU programs.

If you can match/exceed demand 24/7/365 no need for incentives to shift loads... just charge $$$$ rates all the time vs. just during the daytime.

If our utility (PSEG LI) offered TOU and EV plans they would lose money because they would be discounting the 23 cents/kWh they get 24hrs day currently.
 

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If our utility (PSEG LI) offered TOU and EV plans they would lose money because they would be discounting the 23 cents/kWh they get 24hrs day currently.
That would depend on HOW they change the rate plan(s). I know that PG&E's Time Of Use plan charges *much more* during peak than the standard rate. So, if a utility's "standard" rate was $0.23/kWh at noon, with a TOU plan it might be .35/kWh at noon (and .14/kWh at midnight).
 

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Right. Time-of-use makes so much sense, esp. with the option of charging EV's off peak hours. I really don't understand why utility companies aren't moving in that direction at a faster pace.
On Long Island the answer is simple: Incompetence.
 
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Right. Time-of-use makes so much sense, esp. with the option of charging EV's off peak hours. I really don't understand why utility companies aren't moving in that direction at a faster pace.
If your peak demand is higher than what you can produce, you come up with incentives like TOU programs.

If you can match/exceed demand 24/7/365 no need for incentives to shift loads... just charge $$$$ rates all the time vs. just during the daytime.

If our utility (PSEG LI) offered TOU and EV plans they would lose money because they would be discounting the 23 cents/kWh they get 24hrs day currently.
I noticed Seattle City Light and Tacoma Power signed the letter as well. Woohoo! Now if only they offered TOU. I'm paying $0.13/kWh while people on Puget Sound Energy pay $0.09/kWh. Not sure if PSE uses block pricing like SCL, though.
 

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If your peak demand is higher than what you can produce, you come up with incentives like TOU programs.

If you can match/exceed demand 24/7/365 no need for incentives to shift loads... just charge $$$$ rates all the time vs. just during the daytime.

If our utility (PSEG LI) offered TOU and EV plans they would lose money because they would be discounting the 23 cents/kWh they get 24hrs day currently.
A utility (and serviced community) has an incentive to implement TOU even if they are capable of supplying peak demand since the cost to generate peak power can be much more than base load. In other words, it doesn't make sense to subsidize peak power production (lose money on it) by overcharging off peak production.

As far as I can figure, fixed pricing only makes sense is if peak demand can be met relatively cheap, which probably means abundant hydro or nuclear.
 

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I noticed Seattle City Light and Tacoma Power signed the letter as well. Woohoo! Now if only they offered TOU. I'm paying $0.13/kWh while people on Puget Sound Energy pay $0.09/kWh. Not sure if PSE uses block pricing like SCL, though.
I'm on SnoPUD and it is .103/kwh. No tiers.
 
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