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You can drive from South East Arizona to San Diego, CA with three charging stops right now in your Bolt EV... why do you think you need a Tesla for this trip? ...
Keith, in theory you could (see map below), but I'm a bit dubious about the reliability of the charging stations. I live around twenty miles south of Tucson. My sister live in El Cajon, around 430 miles away. I've looked at the possibility of charging my way to her place, and figure it would take a charge in Casa Grande (100 miles from our house), then charge in Yuma (about another 170 miles), then around 165 miles to CA destination. A new (Dateland), not yet in service station is coming on-line between Casa Grande and Yuma, don't know when it will be active.

The charging stations at Casa Grande look good. Yuma has improved from when I first checked it out (it's now rated as a 9.6 on PlugShare). So, if all went well, it'd be an hour at Casa Grande, an hour in Yuma, then on to El Cajon. Yes, doable, a bit long due to charging, but it is possible now.

Rich



 

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I have a Bolt. Great car. It's my Cape Cod runabout. I will buy a Tesla Y as I need an EV that will take me and my wife to relatives in CA, from our place in southern AZ. A very simple process with a Tesla and the several Superchargers along the route (8 to San Diego). That would be an all but impossible trip with the current charging infrastructure available to non-Tesla autos.

Just a fact of life.

Rich
I quite disagree with that. Thirty seconds on PlugShare would show that it is straight forward. It is easy to find CSS fast chargers on most freeways. Traveling Florida to California just wouldn't be a problem. Now if your relatives lived in North Dakota, that could be an issue. Still, nothing wrong with getting a Y, whatever the reason.
 

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Years ago, I had a serious internal debate on whether to go with Tesla, who was promising a "cheap" Model 3 in the near future; or a 2017 Bolt, that could be ordered with a short delivery time. My situation is that I'm in my 70's, want to enjoy an electric car, and start on the right path of Tesla vs. other manufacturers. My prime consideration was how things would look 4 or 5 years down the road for the cars. Tesla had the edge in technology at that time (and still does), but Musk seemed to be going the route of Apple in their business philosophy. "We own the technology, therefore, we own you". I hated the idea that I would always have to be their customer - only. So I decided to go the "generic" route with a Bolt and it's CCS charging system.

A recent video by Rich Rebuilds
seems to vindicate my decision. If you are not familiar with him, he is very popular on the internet and rebuilds wrecked Teslas, using his electrical engineering skills. Tesla arbitrarily cut-off his use of their fast charge network because his car didn't meet their "standards". Even after he spent $12000 having them re-certify his rebuilt Tesla. This effectively hobbled him in being able to use the car. He owns the car, but they control the recharge system. Too bad for Rich. He was a dedicated fan of Tesla, but feels he is now forced to go with another brand. It would be ironic if he ended-up buying a Bolt. So congratulations on your choice Bolters !
He could get a charging adapter and use the CHAdeMo system, which isn't too bad.
 

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He could get a charging adapter and use the CHAdeMo system, which isn't too bad.
I'm guessing you didn't watch the part of the video where Rich explains the entire DC fast charging capabilities of his car are disabled. It's not just the Supercharger access, the car's OS won't allow DC charging to the battery pack.
 

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I'm guessing you didn't watch the part of the video where Rich explains the entire DC fast charging capabilities of his car are disabled. It's not just the Supercharger access, the car's OS won't allow DC charging to the battery pack.
You are right! Hmm ... that really sucks!
 

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... plus Tesla doesn't do leases (a really stupid business move).
I really like leases -- because my first electric car, bought a few months ago, was a certified premier that had come off a three year lease. Am (of course) loving the car. Only minor problem is that if I charge both my motorcycle and car at the same time (120V) my circuit breaker tends to pop.
 

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Years ago, I had a serious internal debate on whether to go with Tesla, who was promising a "cheap" Model 3 in the near future; or a 2017 Bolt, that could be ordered with a short delivery time. My situation is that I'm in my 70's, want to enjoy an electric car, and start on the right path of Tesla vs. other manufacturers. My prime consideration was how things would look 4 or 5 years down the road for the cars. Tesla had the edge in technology at that time (and still does), but Musk seemed to be going the route of Apple in their business philosophy. "We own the technology, therefore, we own you". I hated the idea that I would always have to be their customer - only. So I decided to go the "generic" route with a Bolt and it's CCS charging system.

A recent video by Rich Rebuilds
seems to vindicate my decision. If you are not familiar with him, he is very popular on the internet and rebuilds wrecked Teslas, using his electrical engineering skills. Tesla arbitrarily cut-off his use of their fast charge network because his car didn't meet their "standards". Even after he spent $12000 having them re-certify his rebuilt Tesla. This effectively hobbled him in being able to use the car. He owns the car, but they control the recharge system. Too bad for Rich. He was a dedicated fan of Tesla, but feels he is now forced to go with another brand. It would be ironic if he ended-up buying a Bolt. So congratulations on your choice Bolters !
I am another Apple hater, and Tesla's similar approach to owning their customers is a real turn off to me. I own a plug-in hybrid and a Bolt that are both FWD, but in Northwest NJ, that is not the winter car you want. I want and need an AWD EV, and the choices are EXPENSIVE and/or unreliable (Tesla, Audi, and Jaguar for examples). When the new Mustang EVs come out, they could be game changers. We will see how after the first year sells out (they appear to have TONS of preorders) whether there is really a market for non-Tesla EVs...
 

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I am another Apple hater, and Tesla's similar approach to owning their customers is a real turn off to me. I own a plug-in hybrid and a Bolt that are both FWD, but in Northwest NJ, that is not the winter car you want. I want and need an AWD EV, and the choices are EXPENSIVE and/or unreliable (Tesla, Audi, and Jaguar for examples). When the new Mustang EVs come out, they could be game changers. We will see how after the first year sells out (they appear to have TONS of preorders) whether there is really a market for non-Tesla EVs...
I learned how to drive in Wisconsin Winters, when they had a lot more snow and ice than they do now, but when I learned to drive, the term AWD wasn't well known and almost all cars were rear wheel drive. I then transitioned to front wheel drive and then to gas guzzlers and AWD vehicles. The Bolt brought be back to front wheel drive and quite frankly it performed beautifully in my 2nd full winter with it. I have a few reasons that all by themselves is why I've outgrown the Bolt and will be buying something else next, but the AWD versus FWD is not in the deal breaker category.
 

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...when I learned to drive, the term AWD wasn't well known and almost all cars were rear wheel drive.
I've always considered FWD cars to be a lot closer to AWD than RWD in terms of snowworthiness. Of course no matter what kind of car you drive the most important factor is still the driver.
 

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I've always considered FWD cars to be a lot closer to AWD than RWD in terms of snowworthiness. Of course no matter what kind of car you drive the most important factor is still the driver.
Traditional ICE FWD cars are second best after AWD in snow due to having the majority of the weight over the front wheels. New FWD EV's with a heavy battery pack between the front and rear axles tend to be less nose heavy. But, with proper snow tires all reports are that the Bolt does excellent in the snow... not so much on the OEM all season tires.

Keith
 

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I own both a Bolt and an all wheel drive Volkswagen Tiguan. My Bolt has winter tires. The Volkswagen, with regular all season tires, does better in the snow - with the exception of stopping distance. The ability to get through snow and get up hills is much better in the Volkswagen.
 

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I learned how to drive in Wisconsin Winters, when they had a lot more snow and ice than they do now, but when I learned to drive, the term AWD wasn't well known and almost all cars were rear wheel drive. I then transitioned to front wheel drive and then to gas guzzlers and AWD vehicles. The Bolt brought be back to front wheel drive and quite frankly it performed beautifully in my 2nd full winter with it. I have a few reasons that all by themselves is why I've outgrown the Bolt and will be buying something else next, but the AWD versus FWD is not in the deal breaker category.
Yeah, upstate NY, a FWD vehicle with traction ctrl and snow tires is excellent and I have never had an issue. On the Bolt, I stuck with the stock tires and they were great the first two winters, the third winter the tread was low and I absolutely would have been stuck in unplowed roads or driveways, but I procrastinated and then leased a new Bolt
 

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I had a Leaf and am also in upstate NY. Even in just wet conditions, if I unleashed the full 107 HP, it would spin the front tires like I was Travis Pastrana. And the tires were not the issue. I would have to set it to ECO mode if I expected to get a grip. I've since vowed to never buy a FWD EV as the torque is beyond what the stock rubber can handle. Maybe the Bolt has a better traction control but my RWD EV is much more controllable in inclement weather than the Leaf ever was.
But, it wasn't long before I could feather and steer the wheel spin in a controlled fashion that was entertaining if no one was around.
 

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Traditional ICE FWD cars are second best after AWD in snow due to having the majority of the weight over the front wheels.
It's not just the weight distribution, it's that on a FWD car the drive wheels do the steering too. For example, if you're trying to pull out with the front wheels cranked around to one side, the tractive effort is much better spent than if you have rear drive wheels trying to plow the front wheels forward.
 

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We used to get lots of freezing rain here in the old days and rear wheel drive cars back then had a definite issue with the rear end trying to pass the front end. Front wheel drive or 4 wheel drive was an big improvement. It was kinda fun driving down the highway and seeing almost every car in front of you losing control as they drove down into a valley and sometimes twirling around a few times before winding up in the ditch. Locals all had studs, but the folks on the interstate, usually not. Now that I'm retired and don't really need to go anywhere I stay home whenever it's going to happen. What happens is we get cold, dry air from the NE and it's like Montana for a week or two and then a Pacific storm pushes in, dumping rain into very cold air trapped in the valleys.
 

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RWD has gotten a lot safer with traction control. I'd have no problem driving in the snow and ice in a modern RWD vehicle given appropriate tires. AWD can help climb up grades that otherwise wouldn't be possible, or to accelerate faster, but can also increase the likelihood of getting into more trouble. I spent 5 hours in a tee shirt and jeans digging out my Subaru because I foolishly tried to push through snow. When you high-center a unibody on snow, it's high-centered everywhere, unlike a truck where you just have to dig out the pumpkin or axle.

FWD is marginally better in the snow than RWD, but it isn't much. There's some advantage to being able to turn the wheels that are powered.
 

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The best car I ever had in the snow was my Miata with winter tires. Could easily maneuver around any SUV with their all-season tires.
 

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My Bolt hasn't got out of my driveway since December. Sometimes it sucks living rural. The driveway isn't exactly snow shovel smooth so it builds up compacted snow and then becomes a skating rink. My Jeep in 4WD even has a wild ride getting up.
So I can't really offer an opinion on the tires until they spend a winter on civilized roads.
 
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