Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

21 - 23 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Thanks. I can never have too much information. Here is an interesting piece that Jack Rickard found on PG&E..

I watched the whole video, and see where the idea that tree huggers caused the problems came from... the push to spend $$$ on renewables. The problem is, PG&E would not have spent the $$$ on maintenance anyway! They have been neglecting their own infrastructure for decades.

You know how he described the idea of bureaucrats and bean counters rather than technically competent people making decisions? The idea of using insulated wire on poles is one of those choices. It looks good to the public that doesn't have any technical knowledge "wires need insulation, everyone know that!"... but unprotected insulated wires are a maintenance nightmare. They are vulnerable to every form of erosion to the insulation you can imagine, and some you wouldn't think of! In addition they are much heavier, much more expensive, and not even a little bit safer. As he said in the video, every pole, every transformer, every bit of the system where that crap is installed will have to be replaced.

The Bureaucrats would rather look good to the public by wasting the $$$ than spend the $$$ on real infrastructure repairs and improvements.

Keith

PS: Good video! It explained a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Maintenance of a power line right of way shouldn't be that expensive. Just go in every fall and harvest all of the Christmas trees. People will pay for those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
Maintenance of a power line right of way shouldn't be that expensive. Just go in every fall and harvest all of the Christmas trees. People will pay for those.
LOL!

Why not bury California's fire-prone power lines underground? The reason is sky high mentions
PG&E, the state's largest utility, maintains approximately 81,000 miles of overhead distribution lines and approximately 26,000 miles of underground distribution lines. It also has about 18,000 miles of larger transmission lines, the majority of which are overhead lines.
Some of those are in remote areas and at high elevations (up several thousand feet). Many (most?) of those trees are not suitable as Christmas trees. Here's some example damage posted at https://www.pge.com/pge_global/common/pdfs/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/Preliminary-images-and-damage-report.pdf from October Public Safety Power Shutoff Event. Page 102 of https://www.pge.com/pge_global/common/pdfs/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/PSPS-Report-Letter-10.09.19.pdf has some more.

There are other electric utilities in California.

(I've been a PG&E PSPS shutoff victim twice already.)
 
21 - 23 of 23 Posts
Top