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Outside the battery warranty, how comprehensive is the rest of the warranty on the Bolt? I'm a little nervous about buying the first model year of the Bolt, and don't want to be on the hook for any issues.

I currently have a 2008 Escape Hybrid and after paying $800 to get the throttle body replaced 2 weeks ago, it's been at the dealer for the past few days while they try to pinpoint an electrical problem that has made it undriveable. I know it's an old car, but I'm hoping for a relatively painless experience with my next car!
 

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EV's don't have anywhere near the moving and wear parts inherent in ICE vehicles, and have proven to be very reliable.

As to specific warranty, the 8yr/100K warrant does cover:
  • High Voltage Wiring
  • Hybrid Powertrain and Battery Control Modules
  • Air Compressor Control Module
  • Accessory DC Power Control Module
  • High Voltage Battery Disconnect Control Module
  • Drive Motor Generator Power Invertor Module
  • Battery Charger Control Module
  • Brake Modulator Assembly
  • Electric drive unit assembly electric motors and all internal components, including the auxiliary fluid pump, auxiliary pump controller, electric motor, and 3-phase cables
From pg 321/322 of the owners manual
http://www.chevrolet.com/content/dam/Chevrolet/northamerica/usa/nscwebsite/en/Home/Ownership/Manuals_and_Videos/02_pdf/2017-chevrolet-bolt-ev-owners-manual.pdf

Generic Chevy Warranty here:
http://www.chevrolet.com/owners/warranty.html
Ask an early Model X owner about the pitfalls of early production units.:eek:

That being said, GM ran the assembly line and produced hundreds of test vehicles that logged extensive miles over several months. Tesla has tended to sell the early "test units" and let customers do field testing. We've had to wait an extra 6 months or so for Bolt deliveries, but it will likely be well sorted and reliable right out of the gate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the information! It's good to know that there will (hopefully) be less issues with the early production models than there have been with the Model X.

Is there anything that isn't covered by the warranty that I should be at all concerned about?
 

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As a car/truck owner for sixty years, a car club member for fifty years and on the car fora internet since the get-go, the Bolt has had fewer problems come up for discussion than any car I've ever owned or followed the discussion on.

The few problem areas which do come up for discussion are piddly and it's incredibly rare to read of a problem affecting mobility.

jack vines
 

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As a car/truck owner for sixty years, a car club member for fifty years and on the car fora internet since the get-go, the Bolt has had fewer problems come up for discussion than any car I've ever owned or followed the discussion on.
I owned a 2012 Prius C, the first model year for that car, and from my forum experiences I think it had fewer actual problems than I've seen discussed about the Bolt. That's not a knock on the Bolt, which I agree has a good track record. But given the complexity of a hybrid I was impressed as heck at how solid the Prius C was.
 

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I owned a 2012 Prius C, the first model year for that car, and from my forum experiences I think it had fewer actual problems than I've seen discussed about the Bolt. That's not a knock on the Bolt, which I agree has a good track record. But given the complexity of a hybrid I was impressed as heck at how solid the Prius C was.
Yes, the Prius, most sources say sold at a loss, is a great transportation module value for the dollar. But it's a last century design; what has Toyota done for us this century? Then, some might say underneath it's a Toyota compact, of which the reliability is unexcelled, with a short-range electric motor grafted on. Well-done, great value for the dollar, but love it? Not so many do.

One could argue, based solely on observation of the contributions to this forum, Bolt owners are a quite different subset than Prius owners. I mentioned I've been into cars for sixty years; each marque and the owners therein have somewhat of personality; not every owner subscribes to the mean, but it's there. Bolt owners in toto are the best educated, the most articulate and much more prone to haruspicy than any of which I've observed. (Porsche owners are always contending for top position in the extremity stakes.)

Your opinions and results may differ, but because the Prius is a hybrid, because it's such bland/generic people mover, because it's so ubiquitous, many owners consider it an appliance and don't think about any more often than they think if their refrigerator.

Only slightly off topic, but remembering when the Prius first came out, when I saw them on highways leading to college campus, they tended to be driven flat out. I always wondered if the college student driving it was pissedoff at the parental unit for sticking the student with that bland POS or if he/she felt because it was so economical, it was go-fast-green?

jack vines
 

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The battery in the Bolt has a much longer warranty: it's 150,000 miles or ten years here in California.

The majority of serious defects found on Bolts were the early builds that had an early version of the battery. It only takes one bad cell to kill a battery. By the middle of 2017 builds, the battery failures were pretty much in the past. My Bolt (December 2017 build) has been almost flawless in 11,000 miles: only one software glitch, that cleared itself after a couple of soft reboots.
 

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Yes, the Prius, most sources say sold at a loss, is a great transportation module value for the dollar. But it's a last century design; what has Toyota done for us this century? Then, some might say underneath it's a Toyota compact, of which the reliability is unexcelled, with a short-range electric motor grafted on. Well-done, great value for the dollar, but love it? Not so many do.

One could argue, based solely on observation of the contributions to this forum, Bolt owners are a quite different subset than Prius owners. I mentioned I've been into cars for sixty years; each marque and the owners therein have somewhat of personality; not every owner subscribes to the mean, but it's there. Bolt owners in toto are the best educated, the most articulate and much more prone to haruspicy than any of which I've observed. (Porsche owners are always contending for top position in the extremity stakes.)

Your opinions and results may differ, but because the Prius is a hybrid, because it's such bland/generic people mover, because it's so ubiquitous, many owners consider it an appliance and don't think about any more often than they think if their refrigerator.

Only slightly off topic, but remembering when the Prius first came out, when I saw them on highways leading to college campus, they tended to be driven flat out. I always wondered if the college student driving it was pissedoff at the parental unit for sticking the student with that bland POS or if he/she felt because it was so economical, it was go-fast-green?

jack vines
Prius Prime 0-60: 10.3

Chevy Bolt 0-60: 6.5

Now that I’m getting older every second counts!
 

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The battery in the Bolt has a much longer warranty: it's 150,000 miles or ten years here in California.
I don't think that is true. Do you have a reference, which either *IS* or *CONTAINS a link to* the actual law, rule, or code that specifies this?

Now, it is true that *PZEV* vehicles (which include Plug-in Hybrids) have a 150K mile warranty on the battery. I don't believe that is true for *ZEV* -rated cars. (I would love to learn that I am wrong, and is why I am asking for the reference to the text of the actual law, rule, or code.)


{{ Oh, the rule relating to PZEVs that I am referring to is : 13 CCR § 1962, 13 CA ADC § 1962 }}
 

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Prius Prime 0-60: 10.3

Chevy Bolt 0-60: 6.5

Now that I’m getting older every second counts!
Best comment I ever saw to a review video was to the Bolt's. Reviewer decided to stomp the accelerator and was giggling with joy at the acceleration. "First time anyone ever got giggly with a Chevy compact."
 

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It looks like the Bolt is included in this California state warranty requirement. There is a long-winded article about ZEV and PZEV eligibility:

https://www.arb.ca.gov/regs/title13old/1962.doc

but it isn't easy to figure out if both ZEVs (like the Bolt) are included with PZEVs (such as plug-in hybrids) as being subject to the warranty requirement. It would be necessary to dig through other specs from the California ARB to figure this out. It's hard to believe that the batteries in PHEVs would be subject to a different standard than EVs.
 

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I think you mean lb-ft, which is the correct unit for torque values.

In the Imperial system, it's used interchangeably, but if you truly want to go there, it really should be in newton-meters, or n-m using SI. :nerd:


I was initially clarifying that it's a multiplication, not a division.
 

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In the Imperial system, it's used interchangeably, but if you truly want to go there, it really should be in newton-meters, or n-m using SI. :nerd:


I was initially clarifying that it's a multiplication, not a division.
In the Imperial system it’s often incorrectly used interchangeably.

Ft-lb and Lb-ft are not the same thing.

I would have let it go if you had let it go, but once you start nitpicking make sure you get it right.
 
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