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2017 Bolt LT
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1,324 Posts
Lived with the 120V charger in a 2017 for the 1st 6 months I had it. That got tiresome as the summer dragged on and the a/c usage required more and more charging. Since I bought the car used, I was not eligible for most of the rebates, but I did find a federal one that was available (iirc it was something like 25% up to $1K). I found a PowerCharge very basic EVSE (no frills other than a DIP switch inside to choose between 16, 24, and 32A; I use 32) on Amazon for about $400, UL listed. It just works. But it cost almost $3K to get the panel upgraded and a new 240V 40A circuit run across the garage (California pricing...with about $150 worth of permits). The federal tax credit covered 1/4 of the total, so it was near the limit. Added to the solar tax credit (installed some panels that year too), it was a very happy year for taxes, though we needed to hire a preparer to make sure all the paperwork was perfect.

The federal credit was supposedly expiring, but I understand it was extended (or else, it did expire and was renewed). And unlike some of the renewable energy credits, it can be be carried forward if you can't use it all in one year because of a low tax liability.

With an older Bolt like mine, there's no reason to pay for installing more than 40A. If you have a newer one, you might investigate getting 60, but while it's usually possible to fit another 40A circuit into a reasonably modern (last 30-40 years) suburban house panel and service capacity, 60 might be a little more questionable, especially if you're also considering going all-electric for everything else/replacing the gas heat and applianes, and adding solar probably with a battery.
 

Registered
2017 Bolt LT
Joined
1,324 Posts
You most likely got what you were supposed to. The dual voltage ones come with some of the higher trim levels EUVs (not sure about EVs) and otherwise they are an extra cost option.
In the "Build Your Car" section of the Bolt web site, the dual-voltage EVSE is an option, at least for the 1LT. Standard is 120V only.
 

Registered
2017 Bolt LT
Joined
1,324 Posts
I almost did a spit-take reading that. How can they possibly justify that rate? I pay 10 cents for regular off cycle charging, and the EV plan is only 3 cents per KWH ( but requires their $750 charger).

Currently I'm using the included charger. I'm considering the utility EV plan, but the break-even point is so far out.
It's California. I'm in SMUD, which has almost the lowest rates of the larger utilities in CA. Minimum winter rate (overnight with EV discount) is just over 9垄/kwh. Maximum summer rate (5-8PM peak) is over 33垄. Most PG&E customers would kill for rates like that. Obviously, they want us to charge overnight...

Compare, though: EVGo daytime rates are over 50垄/kwh (plus a session fee if you're not on a plan) and just under 60垄 at peak times (basically 4-9PM). Most EA, not on a plan, charge 43-45垄/kwh (no session fee) though some are starting to charge more at peak times. Chargepoint is all over the map, and hard to compare because some stations charge session and/or a per-minute fees as well as per-kwh so be careful when comparing. There are outliers both low and high among the smaller networks. Caltrans DC chargers are free, if they're working and you can live with charging in the middle of a homeless camp. Get and use Plugshare. Still, I would expect cases where DC charging would be less expensive than the most punitive PG&E home plan.
 

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2017 Bolt LT
Joined
1,324 Posts
I just can't think of a reason why I would ever turn it off?
If I'm going to be away for an extended period (say, a week or more) I'd like to be able to shut off the EVSE on general principles. Not sure how much "vampire" power it uses, but the ready light is always on. A switch for that would be handy. In my case, I'd just pull the plug.
 
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