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... if I were buying one today, to get either the 40 or 48 amp model for future proofing as those seem to be the charging speeds that make the most sense for the newer models of electric vehicles.
The difference between 40 and 48 amp units is that you should hard wire the 48 amp unit.

Something that's got me a little paranoid is the new GM standard that calls for delivering 80 amps (19.2 kW) over a J1772 connection. In the future, more of their cars will have this capability.

I hope that people are reasonable about what their homes can handle.

Too many EVSE sold on Amazon and eBay don't even have a UL listing.

I am thinking best to charge at slower rates to keep heat build up to a minimum?
How does the Bolts automatic cooling work while plugged in?
In the summertime up here in NoVA, you can hear the car gurgling and whirring as the battery thermal management is working, usually if I've had to drive a longer distance that has taken more than 50% of the battery.

The thermal management seems to do okay even when the garage's temperature gets up around 105.
 

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2022 Bolt 2LT ice blue metallic; 2011 Chevy Volt premier diamond white;
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Thanks for this reply and video link to view. Definitely giving this install more thought now.
I wonder how the Phoenix hot summers come in to play while charging?
We won't be needing to charge everyday as we don't do everyday commute any longer. Most trips around Phoenix will be less than 100 miles.
I am thinking best to charge at slower rates to keep heat build up to a minimum?
How does the Bolts automatic cooling work while plugged in?
The cooling does kick on in Phoenix while charging using the 40 amp Clipper Creek. I have had mine set to 80% charge since new while still waiting on the new battery. I am pretty sure that if the charge is close to the 80% when I plug in I think the car negotiates a lower setting. I have been in the garage when the cooling kicks on in-between charges. Garage parked is probably easier on the battery than a hot soak in the Phoenix sun.
 

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People familiar with both GM and Clipper Creek say that the internals of the 2017-2021 Bolt OEM EVSE are very closely related to Clipper Creek.

I have a 2020 Bolt EV, and I have three EVSE.

(1) Grizzl-E dumb unit, set to 40 amps, and the car keeps it at 32 amps, 7.7 kW. Wiring for the NEMA 14-50 in the garage was so easy that my contractor didn't even charge for it because he had all the parts in his truck.

He delivered a caution, however: There's a wide range of NEMA 14-50 available, most of which seem relatively cheap and it's tempting to save money.

However, most of these are not designed for long duty cycles that might be associated with EV charging. Don't skimp on the price of the 14-50, IMHO.

Although he had heavy wiring with him, he only had a 40 amp breaker, and if I buy a different car I'll open the Grizzl-E and make sure it's set to 32 amps. That's enough unless I do something dumb like get a Hummer or something. (Very unlikely.)

(2)I ran across a 2022-2023 Bolt EUV dual voltage charger and picked that up at a good price. Its delivers 32 amps, and I think that the 7.7 kW it provides you should be enough for anybody even though your EUV can take 48 amps and 11.5 kW.

It's a high quality unit and I'm impressed with it. The handle is rubberised and you have the feeling from handling it that it will last a long time. The plugs need to be seated firmly into the housing to avoid an error message but once you understand this, it's not a problem.

I like this a lot. However, since it's intended to be a portable EVSE, you will need to think about a wall mount for it if this is your permanent EVSE, and you might want to think about a holster, because the handle does not include a cover for the terminals.

Both these things are available on Amazon for very little money, and for most of us this is just enough.

(3)Because my car is a 2020, I still have the OEM 120 volt, 12 amp charger. I have a two plug solution that converts it to 240 volt, but of course it's still limited to 12 amps. I keep this in the car in case I need it, but it's only going to deliver 3 kW (indicated). Still, that's better than 120 volts, right? :)

IMHO, the best solution for the original poster is just to buy a cheap holster and cheap adjustable mount for the OEM EVSE housing, and stick with this.

Although it is only 32 amps, it is sturdy, high quality and won't tax the 14-50 if the contractor goes cheap. In my experience most of us use only about 50% of the Bolt's battery in one day, so the 7.7 kW provided at 32 amps is only going to take four hours to fully charge back the battery.
I'm not very good at picking that up. My bad.
That's Luna. She's a good cat

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving!:)
At my brothers house. Had to stay at a Holiday Inn due to the crowd at his house. But still had a good time!

Our cats name is Winter. A real treat monger!
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Thanks for all the replies so far. Reading through them I am leaning towards using the supplied ESVE as the most cost effective solution along with the free 220 outlet Chevy install offer.
How does this quote for the 220 outlet install look? my thread about quote from Chevy.
With over 200 miles of range I don't see us having any range issues driving around here in Phoenix. No long commutes or anything like that to worry about. 25 miles per hour charge rate seems like plenty since we will mostly be charging in the garage overnight. Not sure we need to future proof our options as hopefully the Bolt EUV will be with us a long time. Our next car after the Bolt will hopefully be a self flying solar car..LOL
Am I correct in assuming using the supplied ESVE at 32A will be less taxing on the electrical system than the larger amp ESVE's, producing less heat and less chance of fire or other issues? Is it also better for the Bolts battery to charge at a lower rate? Especially in higher temperatures like Phoenix never ending summer?
Does the Bolt need to be plugged in for active thermal management to turn on when the car is off. If so can I assume the the supplied ESVE will work?

As suggested I will probably get holders for the box and cable something like this?
Amazon.com: BougeRV Buddle Items - SAE J1772 EV Charger Holder + EV Charging Box Holder : Automotive
 

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That's a lot of questions! LOL....

Thanks for all the replies so far. Reading through them I am leaning towards using the supplied ESVE as the most cost effective solution along with the free 220 outlet Chevy install offer.
Since you already have it, that makes sense. 32 amps will be less taxing on your circuits, sure, although you might want to ask the electrician if you could install a higher than 40 amp breaker and heavier wiring, to future proof your installation...somewhat.

Personally 40 amps is okay for me, for probably a couple of years more.

That's well within the range of cheaper installations I've heard of. It'd be hard for any of us to critique in detail without being there, but it is certainly well inside the cheaper range.

Is it also better for the Bolts battery to charge at a lower rate? Especially in higher temperatures like Phoenix never ending summer?
]
Probably. Eric Way and others believe that it was GM's deliberate decision to limit charging speeds, and that the batteries are capable of taking more if they wanted to do it.

The 7.7 kW AC rate is because that's what the onboard charger will do. The 55 kW DCFC rate is a little more complicated, but the fact that GM has loads of 150 amp CCS1 connectors might have something to do with it.

Does the Bolt need to be plugged in for active thermal management to turn on when the car is off. If so can I assume the the supplied ESVE will work?
It does not need to be plugged in, but if you leave it plugged in the car will be more aggressive with its thermal management, and the OEM EVSE is fine for that.

As suggested I will probably get holders for the box and cable something like this?
Amazon.com: BougeRV Buddle Items - SAE J1772 EV Charger Holder + EV Charging Box Holder : Automotive
That looks good. I just bought one myself, in case I end up installing the OEM dual level charger somewhere. Thanks for linking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
That's a lot of questions! LOL....


Since you already have it, that makes sense. 32 amps will be less taxing on your circuits, sure, although you might want to ask the electrician if you could install a higher than 40 amp breaker and heavier wiring, to future proof your installation...somewhat.

Personally 40 amps is okay for me, for probably a couple of years more.


That's well within the range of cheaper installations I've heard of. It'd be hard for any of us to critique in detail without being there, but it is certainly well inside the cheaper range.

]
Probably. Eric Way and others believe that it was GM's deliberate decision to limit charging speeds, and that the batteries are capable of taking more if they wanted to do it.

The 7.7 kW AC rate is because that's what the onboard charger will do. The 55 kW DCFC rate is a little more complicated, but the fact that GM has loads of 150 amp CCS1 connectors might have something to do with it.


It does not need to be plugged in, but if you leave it plugged in the car will be more aggressive with its thermal management, and the OEM EVSE is fine for that.


That looks good. I just bought one myself, in case I end up installing the OEM dual level charger somewhere. Thanks for linking.
Thanks for the reply.

I got this from someone on another car website site:
If it was mine I'd 1) hardwire to charging station with knife switch cut-off (no 14-50 receptacle at all) , 2) metal conduit only, no plastic, 3) depending on what he does where. no aluminum wire, only copper, 4) expect contractor to pull a permit for the job and get the inspection.

1a) If you do get a 14-50 - Hubbell brand only
 

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Lived with the 120V charger in a 2017 for the 1st 6 months I had it. That got tiresome as the summer dragged on and the a/c usage required more and more charging. Since I bought the car used, I was not eligible for most of the rebates, but I did find a federal one that was available (iirc it was something like 25% up to $1K). I found a PowerCharge very basic EVSE (no frills other than a DIP switch inside to choose between 16, 24, and 32A; I use 32) on Amazon for about $400, UL listed. It just works. But it cost almost $3K to get the panel upgraded and a new 240V 40A circuit run across the garage (California pricing...with about $150 worth of permits). The federal tax credit covered 1/4 of the total, so it was near the limit. Added to the solar tax credit (installed some panels that year too), it was a very happy year for taxes, though we needed to hire a preparer to make sure all the paperwork was perfect.

The federal credit was supposedly expiring, but I understand it was extended (or else, it did expire and was renewed). And unlike some of the renewable energy credits, it can be be carried forward if you can't use it all in one year because of a low tax liability.

With an older Bolt like mine, there's no reason to pay for installing more than 40A. If you have a newer one, you might investigate getting 60, but while it's usually possible to fit another 40A circuit into a reasonably modern (last 30-40 years) suburban house panel and service capacity, 60 might be a little more questionable, especially if you're also considering going all-electric for everything else/replacing the gas heat and applianes, and adding solar probably with a battery.
 

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1a) If you do get a 14-50 - Hubbell brand only
Hubbell is certainly one of the very high quality outlets more suited for long duty cycles. It might increase the amount of your estimate considering that the outlet's about 100.00.

I don't see a need to hard wire if you're 40 amps and below. You never know when you might want to make an EVSE change for some reason...maybe you'll decide you want WiFi and Bluetooth at some point.

If you decide later in life to have an EV that you want to charge at 48 amps - 80 amps, it'll be easier to hard wire because the conduit is already there. If you need heavier wire, the line's already there to thread it.

At the stage you and I are right now, I just don't see a need to hard wire.

Your correspondent is correct in his statement about metal conduit and copper wire.

It sounds to me like you're doing enough research to know what you're doing, now. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Hubbell is certainly one of the very high quality outlets more suited for long duty cycles. It might increase the amount of your estimate considering that the outlet's about 100.00.

I don't see a need to hard wire if you're 40 amps and below. You never know when you might want to make an EVSE change for some reason...maybe you'll decide you want WiFi and Bluetooth at some point.

If you decide later in life to have an EV that you want to charge at 48 amps - 80 amps, it'll be easier to hard wire because the conduit is already there. If you need heavier wire, the line's already there to thread it.

At the stage you and I are right now, I just don't see a need to hard wire.

Your correspondent is correct in his statement about metal conduit and copper wire.

It sounds to me like you're doing enough research to know what you're doing, now. ;-)
Thanks again for the replies, very helpful feedback.
 

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I bought a Mustart 240 charger but got scared by the mongering about how crappy Mustart is.

Although I have been using the Mustart for 1.5 years without an issue.

And outside at all times. Wind Rain Snow Freezing Rain Intense Sun and dust.

Took it all in stride.

I ordered a Grizzl-E Level 2 EV Charger.

Just to be safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Hubbell is certainly one of the very high quality outlets more suited for long duty cycles. It might increase the amount of your estimate considering that the outlet's about 100.00.

I don't see a need to hard wire if you're 40 amps and below. You never know when you might want to make an EVSE change for some reason...maybe you'll decide you want WiFi and Bluetooth at some point.

If you decide later in life to have an EV that you want to charge at 48 amps - 80 amps, it'll be easier to hard wire because the conduit is already there. If you need heavier wire, the line's already there to thread it.

At the stage you and I are right now, I just don't see a need to hard wire.

Your correspondent is correct in his statement about metal conduit and copper wire.

It sounds to me like you're doing enough research to know what you're doing, now. ;-)
Just an update on where we are at. I sent an email to the contractor with a short list of questions. He actually called me to go over them.

Yes they only use metal conduit and copper wire. They will use 6 gauge copper wire. They also use Hubble outlets since this is for an EVSE install. We are going to use the supplied 32 amp EVSE. Slower charge rates might be better for battery in the Phoenix heat in my thinking anyways. I asked him about installing a GFCI breaker and he said the ones that they have installed they end up having to go back and replace as they don't play well with the GFCI built into the EVSE's. Were going to stick with the 40 AMP breaker. He said Phoenix is kinda behind the times as far as codes goes and some inspectors will not pass the 50 AMP breaker for 32 AMP EVSE. He said I could swap out if needed at a later date since we would have the 6 gauge wire in place....

And they take care of the permit stuff too.
Kinda all makes sense???
 

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Siemens Versicharge 30Amp. I know a lot of people have had issues with this but in the five years I've been using it, it's needed to be reset (unplugged/plugged in ) like 5 times. It was on the low end of cost when I bought it and it was $500 for installation (probably 25 ft of wire, a breaker, a wall socket). I was commuting at the time and there was no way to make that work with the 110 charger. I'm retired now and could probably get by with 110, but would not like to do so.
That's what I have. Working perfectly for over 2 years.
 

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So we just got our 2023 EUV last week and just started the process to get the 220 outlet installed. Are people using the supplied 220 charge cord supplied with the car or are you buying a charging station and using that?

Our utility company has 250.00 rebate program and I am wondering if we should take advantage of the offer or just use the supplied charge cord?

We just bought our 2022 Bolt EV last August and they only supplied a 110V EVSE. Should we have gotten a 220V EVSE as well or instead of? Were we ripped off?
 

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I am using a Clipper Creek HCS-40. It's a 32 Amp heavy duty model that I was lucky enough to find on the CC website refurbished, at a good discount a couple of years ago when I got my 2020 Bolt. You would probably want to buy the 40 or 50 amp model these days.
Have the HCS-40R, purchased in 2017. The R mean "Ruggedized." It features a rubber over-molded SAE J1772 connector. My J1772 head definitely feels heavier and more solid than on other standard CC units I've used. I think the R came with 2 years more warranty and was $100 more over the HCS-40, so I viewed the unit as $50/year extended warranty.

During the warranty period I did have a glitch with the unit. Something about the contactors if I remember correctly. Called CC and they shipped me a new unit w/o any hassles. The newer unit I received had a shorter reset time. The CC is sensitive to line spikes. Supposedly Keurig's are notorious for sending line spikes that the CC will detect and go offline for safety. My old unit would wait for 15 minutes before trying to charge again. The new unit only waits for a minute or so (maybe less) before rechecking and charging again.

I called CC a few times with questions and always got fast, knowledgeable service. Hopefully that still is true after the purchase by Enphase. It's not fancy with wifi or data if that is important to you. I just want something simple and reliable. No regrets now five years later.
 

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I am using the Chevy OEM Dual- level charger plugged into the new 240V outlet installed two weeks ago. Works fine. Mine is mounted on the side of the house, and I bought a garden hose rack to hold the charging cable while I'm not charging. I looked into the aftermarket chargers, but not worth the $400 to $800 to me at this time. Maybe down the road.
 

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You most likely got what you were supposed to. The dual voltage ones come with some of the higher trim levels EUVs (not sure about EVs) and otherwise they are an extra cost option.
In the "Build Your Car" section of the Bolt web site, the dual-voltage EVSE is an option, at least for the 1LT. Standard is 120V only.
 

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We just bought our 2022 Bolt EV last August and they only supplied a 110V EVSE. Should we have gotten a 220V EVSE as well or instead of? Were we ripped off?
There is a hack to use the OEM 120V EVSE on 240V @ 12A. The EVSE appears to be a rebadged Webasto / Clipper Creek dual voltage-capable EVSE. It's not certified for such use, so it's at your own risk and a lockout box for the adapter is recommended.

 
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