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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been reading that the regen paddle, situated on the back of the left side of the stearing wheel, is to regen while driving, slowing the car down without braking. I also read that if you use it in L driving mode (one pedal driving), then it causes the auto regen to increase. I haven’t experienced that myself. It does not seem to do anything at all when I drive in L mode.

Have you had a different experience?
 

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The paddle increases the regen when operating in L mode.

The accelerator pedal has variable regen which increases to maximum once foot is lifted from the pedal. Paddle provides additional, but not variable, regen to the L mode (or by itself if in D mode). As stated by xj12 above, the regen paddle is a "bang bang" controller. It's either applied or not. The paddle has no variability.
 

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You vary the paddle regen with the accelerator pedal, just as you do the regular regen in L.
Correct. I thought about adding that. Just seems less intuitive to be hitting full regen with the paddle and trying to accelerate. Seems like a great way to confuse yourself if an emergency arises.
 

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The throttle pedal offers variable regenerative braking in bot 'D' and 'L' mode, but 'L' mode offers greater braking. The steering wheel paddle offers a higher level of regen than both 'D' and 'L' mode, and is additive to 'D' and 'L' mode, but it is not variable: it's on or off.

http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesl...s-nissan-leaf-sl-vs-tesla-model-3-long-range/

Check out the graph about one-third of the way down in the article. All three graphs for the Bolt are when the throttle pedal is fully released. Note that the Bolt offers more regenerative braking than the Tesla Model 3, and can bring the Bolt to a full stop, which the Tesla's system cannot.
 

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Modulate the paddle and the pedal together

The paddle increases the regen when operating in L mode.

The accelerator pedal has variable regen which increases to maximum once foot is lifted from the pedal. Paddle provides additional, but not variable, regen to the L mode (or by itself if in D mode). As stated by xj12 above, the regen paddle is a "bang bang" controller. It's either applied or not. The paddle has no variability.
Actually, you can modulate the paddle, by hitting it repeatedly at different rates to change the rate at which your car slows down. You can also change the rate by keeping your foot a bit on the "one pedal". Its all subtle and a delight to do.
 

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The other thing I use the regen paddle for is to disengage the cruise control when I'm coming up behind someone who's a little slower than me. I can press the accelerator pedal the appropriate amount and give a quick tap on the regen paddle to drop out of cruise control without bringing on any strong deceleration.
 

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You vary the paddle regen with the accelerator pedal, just as you do the regular regen in L.
It took me a while to believe what GJETSON (and a few others) points out because of a weird misconception in my head: I always likened the max regen paddle to the brake (wrong). If you hold the paddle down (hopefully in a straight line cause easier to handle) you can actually accelerate to reduce the amount you slow down due to regen. As you modulate the accelerator pedal, you can modulate the regen (what GJETSON means by "just as you do the regular regen in L"). As you lift off the accel while in L and with paddle pressed, your regen will decrease w/r to the rate you lift off the accel.

Anyone who wishes to try this should look for a long, straight stretch of light traffic freeway (try late at night away from cities) as you have enough inertia to illustrate this and alternate between different regen scenarios:

1. Let off accelerator pedal in D
2. Let off pedal in L
3. Foot off pedal in L
4. Foot off pedal in D
5. Foot off pedal in L, pull paddle.
6. Foot off pedal in L, pull paddle.
7. Pull paddle, let off pedal slowly in D or L.
 
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Beautiful interplay between paddle and pedal

It took me a while to believe what GJETSON (and a few others) points out because of a weird misconception in my head:

1. Let off accelerator pedal in D
2. Let off pedal in L
3. Foot off pedal in L
4. Foot off pedal in D
5. Foot off pedal in L, pull paddle.
6. Foot off pedal in L, pull paddle.
7. Pull paddle, let off pedal slowly in D or L.
I don't want to be pedantic about the particular instructions here, but welcome to Bolt EV driving - wonderful stuff! At some point, driving lessons are going to include all these tricks that you learn gradually when you first own the beautiful Bolt EV. I absolutely luv the interplay between the paddle and pedal in the Bolt EV, but I never use D. Its a bit like the interplay between clutch and pedal in a stick-shift. I always enjoyed that too.
 

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The throttle pedal offers variable regenerative braking in bot 'D' and 'L' mode, but 'L' mode offers greater braking. The steering wheel paddle offers a higher level of regen than both 'D' and 'L' mode, and is additive to 'D' and 'L' mode, but it is not variable: it's on or off.

http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesl...s-nissan-leaf-sl-vs-tesla-model-3-long-range/

Check out the graph about one-third of the way down in the article. All three graphs for the Bolt are when the throttle pedal is fully released. Note that the Bolt offers more regenerative braking than the Tesla Model 3, and can bring the Bolt to a full stop, which the Tesla's system cannot.
The Motor Trend article was in error. The Bolt EV coastdown deceleration, with accelerator pedal fully released, of the 4 different modes is in the first attachment. I calculated this based on the second attachment, which was derived from data presented by Josh Tavel (Bolt EV Chief Engineer) to journalists here https://youtu.be/yQ8P7Ooo-7w?t=24m12s
 

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The other thing I use the regen paddle for is to disengage the cruise control when I'm coming up behind someone who's a little slower than me. I can press the accelerator pedal the appropriate amount and give a quick tap on the regen paddle to drop out of cruise control without bringing on any strong deceleration.
A very good point, which I am glad you added. I have trained myself to always exit CC with the paddle and not the (brake) pedal.
 

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The Bolt EV coastdown deceleration, with accelerator pedal fully released, of the 4 different modes is in the first attachment. I calculated this based on the second attachment, which was derived from data presented by Josh Tavel (Bolt EV Chief Engineer) to journalists here https://youtu.be/yQ8P7Ooo-7w?t=24m12s
While this is very interesting, actually hitting and releasing the paddle repeatedly and with varying rates, while at the same time varying the pedal will modulate these curves so you can control the car in between them.This is much more flexible than "pedal fully released". However, it remains true that I more often use the paddle more as way to increase slowdown rate when I misjudge a turn, or for kicking out of cruise. Most of the rest of the time, the pedal does all the slowing down I need in regular traffic.

By the way, I am able to use cruise control much more in regular traffic than with an ICE car. Its so consistent.
 

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By the way, I am able to use cruise control much more in regular traffic than with an ICE car. Its so consistent.
Great point: love that it works down to 24 mph (old car wouldn't engage properly until 35 mph). For traffic, I just fiddle with the cruise speed +/- 1mph and can typically never touch the foot pedals at all except for at stop lights.

Might be **** on the CC buttons, though. Hopefully they don't wear away since they appear to be back-lit so they're not printed on.
 

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Regen Paddle on V/B/olt

Yes, it does exactly that. Have you perhaps tried with a (close to) full battery?
I finally figured out why the paddle was inop on our Volt descending from our house 500 negative feet on the five miles into town: Battery was fully charged and no room to put any regen kWh in there. Now with the Bolt hilltop mode, there's room, regen works all the way in, and I end up in town with more juice in the battery than when I started!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The Motor Trend article was in error. The Bolt EV coastdown deceleration, with accelerator pedal fully released, of the 4 different modes is in the first attachment. I calculated this based on the second attachment, which was derived from data presented by Josh Tavel (Bolt EV Chief Engineer) to journalists here https://youtu.be/yQ8P7Ooo-7w?t=24m12s
Thanks for the graphs. That explains why I didn’t feel the paddle when I used it. I was using it mostly as I was getting closer to a stop light or stop sign. Looks like at that speed, the deceleration in L with or without paddle is more or less the same. But for slowing down at higher speeds, it makes a difference. I get it now. Thank you very much!
 
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