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My bolt not even fully charged gets 100 plus more miles
That is because your usage patterns and driving habits are different than what the EPA uses as its model for testing. You happen to be a more conservative driver. Me, on the other hand, get around 225 miles for a full charge. Most of the time I use hilltop reserve, which means I actually get about 200 miles of predicted range. And I'm okay with that because I know I'm not a conservative driver. I've always gotten less than the EPA mileage ratings. I speed, live in a hilly area, and don't coast nearly as much I could.
 

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My bolt not even fully charged gets 100 plus more miles
That is because your usage patterns and driving habits are different than what the EPA uses as its model for testing. You happen to be a more conservative driver. Me, on the other hand, get around 225 miles for a full charge. Most of the time I use hilltop reserve, which means I actually get about 200 miles of predicted range. And I'm okay with that because I know I'm not a conservative driver. I've always gotten less than the EPA mileage ratings. I speed, live in a hilly area, and don't coast nearly as much I could.
I can understand that completely. I do the occasional speeding myself. I also live in Hawaii, so I don't just drive up and down hills, I dive up and down mountains lol.
 

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:xMost Bolt owners are achieving better than the EPA projected 238 miles per charge. As I've gotten older, I'm driving more conservatively, averaging 260-280 miles on a full charge. Regardless how you drive, how many EV miles you're getting, you're just another charge away from at least 200 miles EV. No need to drive conservatively if that's not your style.
 
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Would drivers use regenerative braking less when the roads are more slippery? That would affect the winter range a bit.
 

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When I use car around town going between 30 and 45 mph I am getting about 5.5 miles per kWh. However the vast majority of my miles are highway going 70 mph. I am still averaging about 4 miles per kWh overall, which is the EPA estimate. This is using air conditioning. Now during the winter where I will be using heat it will probably be closer to 3 miles per kWh.
 

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To be honest, the EPA has a very bureaucratic procedure for mileage estimates: they design a generic test and then run every car through it exactly the same way. There's supposed to be very little 'thinking' involved, it's a very methodical process. Most of the rules make sense when you start to dig into them, and they are designed for consistent results across vehicles more than they are designed for real-world estimates.

For example, I think they aren't allowed to put vehicles in a more efficient mode, since not every driver will choose to use that mode. So they end up testing the Bolt in 'D' rather than 'L', even though most of us prefer 'L'. And they might even have to turn on 'Sport' mode, even though most of us aren't using it regularly.
 

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The manufacturer does the testing, not the EPA. The EPA spot checks some vehicles to ensure compliance.
There is leeway in some parameters, and you sometimes see "The manufacturer has voluntarily lowered xxxxx" in the notes.

If people are interested, the data is available here:
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/epadata/17data.zip

From the notes:
"(tested in the Drive mode without using the "Regen-On-Demand" steering wheel paddle)"
Sport mode on the Bolt would not impact the test. It doesn't change anything except accelerator pedal mapping and the EPA test has defined acceleration rates that would yield the same results in either mode.
 

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:xMost Bolt owners are achieving better than the EPA projected 238 miles per charge. As I've gotten older, I'm driving more conservatively, averaging 260-280 miles on a full charge. Regardless how you drive, how many EV miles you're getting, you're just another charge away from at least 200 miles EV. No need to drive conservatively if that's not your style.
For many people, charging at home and leaving each morning with 238 miles "in the tank" meets 100% of their driving needs. For those of us who, for 10% of the time, need to go a "just below projected range" distance, adding an extra 45-50 miles to that range often makes the "go, no go" decision. I do not drive "conservatively" around home. Why should I? But it is nice to know "how" to modify driving to make those infrequent long (450-500 mile) trips possible.
 

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Haven't seen the report but if GM conducted the test, which is fairly typical for the manufacturer to do, they can legally under report their numbers. This is apparently what Tesla did with the model 3 possibly to differentiate it more from the Model S.
"If you take what Tesla reported to the EPA from their tests which was 455 Hwy and 495 City and put it into the formula you get ((455*.45)+(495*.55))*.7 =334 EPA projected range"
Tesla is claiming 310 for the LR version.
 

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The manufacturer does the testing, not the EPA. The EPA spot checks some vehicles to ensure compliance.
There is leeway in some parameters, and you sometimes see "The manufacturer has voluntarily lowered xxxxx" in the notes.

If people are interested, the data is available here:
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/epadata/17data.zip

From the notes:
"(tested in the Drive mode without using the "Regen-On-Demand" steering wheel paddle)"
Sport mode on the Bolt would not impact the test. It doesn't change anything except accelerator pedal mapping and the EPA test has defined acceleration rates that would yield the same results in either mode.
One point to add to this. Manufacturers in the case of EVs don't actually want to show the maximum possible range you could get out of the car. They have to balance showing maximum range and real world expectations of how the car will be used and driven. I mean imagine the backlash against GM right now if they had used all the techniques to improve the range and show it should get on average 275 mile per charge. So from their perspective they not only have to honor the conditions of the test but they have to balance real world use expectations of the car so they don't look like jerks.
 

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Haven't seen the report but if GM conducted the test, which is fairly typical for the manufacturer to do, they can legally under report their numbers. This is apparently what Tesla did with the model 3 possibly to differentiate it more from the Model S.
"If you take what Tesla reported to the EPA from their tests which was 455 Hwy and 495 City and put it into the formula you get ((455*.45)+(495*.55))*.7 =334 EPA projected range"
Tesla is claiming 310 for the LR version.
Or they can be like Ford and Hyundai and ILLEGALLY over-report the numbers. :)
 

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The EPA "spot checking" hasn't worked in the past very well. The EPA is simply too cheap,
and lazy to do the testing themselves. My biggest gripe is their dopey MPGe ratings.
After using MPG for about a thousand years, one would think MPKwhr would be the appropriate metric for reporting EV fuel mileages. But Noooo..!!!!!
 

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I have not even seen EPA rated range yet. For my ~65 mile commute, I've only been getting 220 miles of range (ignoring the "min/max" ranges on the GOM). This is in 50 to 70 degF dry weather. My commute has been freeway recently since I don't have to hypermile anymore and I do use some heat in the morning (set HVAC to 70F with ambient at 50F).
 

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That could be because I go 75+ on the freeway often though.
Uh, YEAH! :nerd:

The manual states that for range keep it below 50 mph, back of the envelope myself and some other engineers estimate that for the Bolt (not other cars) you start getting hit at 40 mph. For all cars once you go above 55 wind resistance is exponential. Well it's exponential throughout the range but the curve knees past that. The Bolt does nicely with a .308 drag which is about as good as you can do with this stubby body (.21 is really as good as anybody reasonably has done). I found that with sub 40mph driving it's easy to get 300 mi range, but above that it drops quite a bit.
 

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Well at least now when I vacation in Hawaii, I can get Benhopson to drive me around.

I love my Bolt so much the thought of going back to an ICE is giving me hot flashes and nightmares...

The Bolt is perfect for Hawaii..on a beautiful island with no emissions so the rest of us can enjoy.

Gas ain't cheap in Hawaii.

Benhopson...are you available for hire? Hawaii in a Bolt, what could be better.

Mahalo.

PS. Please send Malasadas ASAP! That could make us feel better here on the mainland. Send a box to me and I will distribute to forum members...NOT!
 

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