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In a recent article on Ars Technica, we learned some new things about EA's status and some things that are upcoming:


  • A total of 484 sites will be operational by the end of the year (this is some slippage, it had been July). Out of the these, the design and engineering is complete for all but two. About 30 sites are still submitting permits; 370 sites have all permits and are in construction; 267 have had construction completed, and 158 are already in use.
  • EA will also be implementing ISO 15118 plug-and-charge by the end of the year.
  • EA will have a membership plan, at about $4 a month for reduced prices.
  • EA will have tired pricing. 0-75kW for older EVs like the Chevrolet Bolt or Nissan Leaf, as well as any Tesla using a CCS adapter dongle; 76kW-125kW; and 126kW-350kW. The tier is determined by car model, not the user or battery SoC.
  • An app (that you can use for NFC authorized charging) looks to be pretty much done and ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
It's also worth comparing EA's early phase-I plans to the current version.

Plan from several months ago:



Current Plan:



I'd love to overlay them, but they shape of the maps is different. (Grr.)
 

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Also, from the comments, apparently faster charging EVs are a pain.

Also, given what Palazzo told us about demand charges received by EA from utilities, I would think they'd prefer to have more people charging at up to 75kW. "When we were testing the Audi e-tron demonstrating charging 3 cars, that was 450kW at once, for 25 min charging. We got a bill for almost $1500 [from the utility]! That's not a cost you can pass on the to customer so have to have a solution to make the business viable."

[This is a direct quote but I didn't include it in the story because it was getting long enough already and would have required a digression about demand pricing for utilities.]
 

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Also, from the comments, apparently faster charging EVs are a pain.
Demand charges are the main obstacle standing in the way of fast charging providers being profitable. I can only imagine the demand chargers the 40 stall Tesla Supercharger site at Kettleman racks up when all 40 stalls are full with charging Teslas. Or an EA site in the future with 10 Porsche Taycons charging at ~350 kW.
 

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In a recent article on Ars Technica, we learned some new things about EA's status and some things that are upcoming:


  • A total of 484 sites will be operational by the end of the year (this is some slippage, it had been July). Out of the these, the design and engineering is complete for all but two. About 30 sites are still submitting permits; 370 sites have all permits and are in construction; 267 have had construction completed, and 158 are already in use.
  • EA will also be implementing ISO 15118 plug-and-charge by the end of the year.
  • EA will have a membership plan, at about $4 a month for reduced prices.
  • EA will have tired pricing. 0-75kW for older EVs like the Chevrolet Bolt or Nissan Leaf, as well as any Tesla using a CCS adapter dongle; 76kW-125kW; and 126kW-350kW. The tier is determined by car model, not the user or battery SoC.
  • An app (that you can use for NFC authorized charging) looks to be pretty much done and ready to go.
All of that is good news to me. Looks like they might be listening considering the tiered charging pricing.
 

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Demand charges are the main obstacle standing in the way of fast charging providers being profitable. I can only imagine the demand chargers the 40 stall Tesla Supercharger site at Kettleman racks up when all 40 stalls are full with charging Teslas. Or an EA site in the future with 10 Porsche Taycons charging at ~350 kW.
True. And this is why many networks (Electrify America, EVGo, and of course Tesla) are adding batteries to their stations. If you can lower the demand by shifting the energy pulled from the grid, you could save a ton of money.

https://electricrevs.com/2019/02/04/tesla-battery-storage-going-to-100-electrify-america-locations-in-2019/
 

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How many of the 484 stations are cycle 1 and how many are cycle 2?
It's also good news that EA is partnering with auto manufacturers to provide free or reduced cost charging. Are you listening Chevy??
 

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Demand charges are the main obstacle standing in the way of fast charging providers being profitable. I can only imagine the demand chargers the 40 stall Tesla Supercharger site at Kettleman racks up when all 40 stalls are full with charging Teslas. Or an EA site in the future with 10 Porsche Taycons charging at ~350 kW.
True. And this is why many networks (Electrify America, EVGo, and of course Tesla) are adding batteries to their stations. If you can lower the demand by shifting the energy pulled from the grid, you could save a ton of money.

https://electricrevs.com/2019/02/04/tesla-battery-storage-going-to-100-electrify-america-locations-in-2019/
You will save some money, but not much, because batteries are expensive so your capital costs increase (the batteries have a service life and given that they are used 10x as much as a car battery will only last a couple of years, then you have disposal costs and new acquisition costs).
 

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Demand charges are the main obstacle standing in the way of fast charging providers being profitable. I can only imagine the demand chargers the 40 stall Tesla Supercharger site at Kettleman racks up when all 40 stalls are full with charging Teslas. Or an EA site in the future with 10 Porsche Taycons charging at ~350 kW.
This is where the recently implemented NY plan should help offset demand charges

"The incentive is designed to reduce the impact of the demand charges the owners of the charging stations would otherwise have to pay."

https://www.publicpower.org/periodical/article/ny-unveils-316-million-incentives-ev-charging-stations
 

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This is where the recently implemented NY plan should help offset demand charges

"The incentive is designed to reduce the impact of the demand charges the owners of the charging stations would otherwise have to pay."

https://www.publicpower.org/periodical/article/ny-unveils-316-million-incentives-ev-charging-stations
That's a strange incentive. The state pays the provider, and the payments diminish over time? The provider is then taking a significant risk that business will grow commensurate with the declining incentives.
 

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That's a strange incentive. The state pays the provider, and the payments diminish over time? The provider is then taking a significant risk that business will grow commensurate with the declining incentives.
I wish someone would fund my business with payments that decline over time.....business life is all about making an investment and planning for it to catch on prior to running out of cash and this provides a nice head start.
 

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I wish someone would fund my business with payments that decline over time.....business life is all about making an investment and planning for it to catch on prior to running out of cash and this provides a nice head start.
Well, start a business running a DCQC network in NYS and you will get your wish.
 

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I am thinking of my own personal situation Vs. My old gas car. I would estimate with today's gas prices in Texas I could get around 250 highway miles for $20 in gas - that's assuming 30 mpg for my old 4 cylinder car. If EA's prices are true (non members = 0.30 per minute vs. Basic free membership and download app = 0.24 per minute) I would estimate I could get close to 250 miles of EV range for around 75 minute charge time and that would be around $20 in charging fees. So if these numbers are close to true it would make EA's chargers basically close to gas type prices. Obviously there are other factors I'm not even stating such as depreciation of the cars no need for oil changes etc. I'm ok with about an average price of $20 per "fill up" if that's what is needed to keep EA stations viable / maintained and available to all of us that don't have extra cash for Teslas.
 

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It's also worth comparing EA's early phase-I plans to the current version.

Plan from several months ago:

Current Plan:

I'd love to overlay them, but they shape of the maps is different. (Grr.)
No, the earlier map was just screwed up by the art dept.... it does not represent any actual earlier plan.
 

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True. And this is why many networks (Electrify America, EVGo, and of course Tesla) are adding batteries to their stations. If you can lower the demand by shifting the energy pulled from the grid, you could save a ton of money.

https://electricrevs.com/2019/02/04/tesla-battery-storage-going-to-100-electrify-america-locations-in-2019/
Right. The 100+ Tesla storage systems that EA is installing will mostly be located in California and the northeastern US to mitigate utility demand fees.
 

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Nice overlay, Vertiformed. I'd say they were very true to their goal, even if they had to make minor adjustments in the final implementation.
 

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I wish someone would fund my business with payments that decline over time.....business life is all about making an investment and planning for it to catch on prior to running out of cash and this provides a nice head start.
Well, start a business running a DCQC network in NYS and you will get your wish.
If you want to become a millionaire (and you're currently a billionaire) start a DCFC network.
 
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