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Discussion Starter #1
I know a few of the members here own a Tesla(s), some in addition to their Bolt.

Would be interesting to get a roll call including the Model and how long you've owned it for.

I ordered a 2020 Model Y (long Range, AWD, no FSD) at our local Tesla Store last week, I have my reservation number... now I just have to wait!
My 2017 Bolt will be going to a friend for his wife as her daily driver/commute car.

So, who's got a Tesla?.......
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you D.... like the say "waiting is the hardest part", and I suspect I will be waiting till summer to get my Model Y.
 

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Elon has my zero percent $100 loan on a pickup. But I do have one in my immediate family available to me to drive whenever I wish. Its nice. Also a few others in the non-immediate family.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was kind of strange how any pre Feb 2020 Model Y reservations required a $2,500 deposit... but now that they are actually producing the Model Y they will only accept a $100 deposit.

I guess the $2,500 reservations holders were funding the Model Y production line buildup.
 

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I bought a used 2013 Tesla Model S that had a bit under 70,000 miles about 17 months ago now. It is at 105,000 miles and still fully charges to 245 miles from the original 265 miles. It is a great car, but I am really thinking that the extra range of the new models may eventually lead to a change. I would love to have a car like the Model 3 with 400 mile range. I have a "deposit" down for the Cybertruck and I am thinking of changing it to the 500 mile range version. My long trips are always during holidays and I would love to avoid the long lines as Tesla continues to ramp up production.
 

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I ordered a 2020 Model Y (long Range, AWD, no FSD) at our local Tesla Store last week,
Lets hope the sheet metal is protected better against sand erosion and salt corrosion than it is in the M3. Tesla does fabulous batteries and power train but the rest of car.... not so much, so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Lets hope the sheet metal is protected better against sand erosion and salt corrosion than it is in the M3. Tesla does fabulous batteries and power train but the rest of car.... not so much, so far.
My history w/cars seems to indicate that I get tired of them in 3yrs or so, as long as it lasts till then I'm good.
If my ext purchase will be fall of 2023 or even early 2024- the all stainless Cybertruck will be available and no worries there about corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I bought a used 2013 Tesla Model S that had a bit under 70,000 miles about 17 months ago now. It is at 105,000 miles and still fully charges to 245 miles from the original 265 miles.
That's great news regarding the battery longevity, especially considering that's a very early build Tesla.
How's the rest of the vehicle holding up? Are things wearing out or is maintenance becoming an issue?

I have a "deposit" down for the Cybertruck and I am thinking of changing it to the 500 mile range version.
I believe Elon is counting on his newly patented "alien technology" battery to get 500mi range out of the Cybertruck.
Not to worry though, people have conjectured for years that he's an alien... so maybe he's just dropping some of his home planet tech on us inners :D
 

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That's great news regarding the battery longevity, especially considering that's a very early build Tesla.
How's the rest of the vehicle holding up? Are things wearing out or is maintenance becoming an issue?


I believe Elon is counting on his newly patented "alien technology" battery to get 500mi range out of the Cybertruck.
Not to worry though, people have conjectured for years that he's an alien... so maybe he's just dropping some of his home planet tech on us inners :D
I can only speak anecdotally regarding my own experiences but I think you get the occasional horror story posted on this forum or elsewhere in a lame attempt to generalize what appears to be an outlier example or at least exaggerated Tesla shortcomings.
There are a few data points that may be a better indicator to the severity of the "panel gap" or "battery degradation" concerns.

One is the overwhelming satisfaction of existing owners that has continued to be the most loved (satisfied?) brand for the past four years I think.
The popularity of the Model 3 is with good reason. We really aren't a bunch of lemmings lured by a pied piper into buying cars for 3X more than we've ever spent on a car previously. The cars have their faults and WTF moments but the net experience evidently exceeds expectations.
It's a rare bird that truly despises the car/company, but they are the ones you hear about.

And another one is the continued decline of warranty reserves (accrual).
28448

And for those looking to claim "fwaud", the auditors listed on the 10K (PwC) also audits Fords 10K.

So far, my biggest complaints are
lack of heated steering wheel
phone app slow to unlock door at times
door handles freeze under the right conditions (or is that wrong conditions)
I have 38k miles in 18 months with no signs of sandblasting of finish or pieces falling off and I tend to abuse the car. It's fit and finish is on par with my previous BMW 5 series if not better.
 

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And another one is the continued decline of warranty reserves (accrual).
That's the money being set aside for warranty repairs, as opposed to the amount actually spent on said repairs, right? That strikes me as one of those numbers that a company can manipulate to achieve whatever goals it deems expedient, such as to make the bottom line look better.

I'm not accusing Tesla of doing that, and it may very well be that their actual warranty costs are really going down. But I think that kind of number makes for poor quality evidence unless it's backed up by something more concrete.
 

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That's the money being set aside for warranty repairs, as opposed to the amount actually spent on said repairs, right? That strikes me as one of those numbers that a company can manipulate to achieve whatever goals it deems expedient, such as to make the bottom line look better.

I'm not accusing Tesla of doing that, and it may very well be that their actual warranty costs are really going down. But I think that kind of number makes for poor quality evidence unless it's backed up by something more concrete.
It's more than just reserves, it provides a trend line with real world data that is blessed by a third party auditor (the same one that Ford uses).

"....These procedures included testing the effectiveness of controls relating to management’s estimate of the automotive warranty reserve, including controls over management’s estimate of the nature, frequency and costs of future claims as well as the completeness and accuracy of actual claims incurred to date. These procedures also included, among others, testing management’s process for determining the automotive warranty reserve. This included evaluating the appropriateness of the model applied and the reasonableness of significant assumptions, including the nature and frequency of future claims and the related costs to repair or replace items under warranty. Evaluating the assumptions related to the nature and frequency of future claims and the related costs to repair or replace items under warranty involved evaluating whether the assumptions used were reasonable considering current and past performance, including a lookback analysis comparing prior period forecasted claims to actual claims incurred. These procedures also included developing an independent estimate of a portion of the warranty accrual, comparing the independent estimate to management’s estimate to evaluate the reasonableness of the estimate, and testing the completeness and accuracy of historical vehicle claims. Procedures were performed to test the reliability, completeness, and relevance of management’s data related to the historical claims processed and that such claims were appropriately used by management in the estimation of future claims. Professionals with specialized skill and knowledge were used to assist in evaluating the appropriateness of aspects of management’s model for estimating the nature and frequency of future claims, and testing management’s warranty reserve for a portion of future warranty claims. "

Note that this is not fabricated numbers by Tesla to cook the books as you speculate and as TSLAQ would have you believe, but "including a lookback analysis comparing prior period forecasted claims to actual claims incurred."

Tesla's financials are probably scrutinized more than any other OEM so if there were any improprieties that held water, we would have heard by now.

I also would like to add one more feel good item for NY-Rob to sleep better with his decision and that is resale.
As most here are aware, Tesla does not negotiate on new vehicle pricing. The pricing get's occasionally adjusted but you don't have the fire sales like GM is doing of late. This bodes well to preserve the value of older cars which if you were an early buyer of the Bolt, you probably cringe at some of the deals out there that make your purchase price and resale value if you ever plan to sell, tough to swallow.
For a variety of additional reasons, the Model 3 has been holding its value quite well.


"High demand has gained the all-electric Tesla Model 3 top place in a list of vehicles – including internal combustion engine cars – in a new study analysing retention of value. "

"In the study, the Tesla Model 3 came out on top by a margin of almost 6%, ahead of utility truck favourite Ford Range, the Chevrolet Traverse and the popular Honda Civic hatchback.
Worth just 5.5% less, or $US2,529 ($A3,780) based on a vehicle costing just under $US46,000 ($A68,769 converted) after a year of ownership, the high resale value of the Model 3 ranks it a better buy on value alone than other high value holders."


I would assume due to the many similarities in product and corporate philosophy between the Model 3 and Model Y, the Model Y will enjoy similar TCOO.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's more than just reserves, it provides a trend line with real world data that is blessed by a third party auditor (the same one that Ford uses).
I think I felt better before you mentioned Ford.

It's kind of like saying, we use the same accountant as Al Capone... what could possibly go wrong? :oops:
 

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I bought a 2020 Four Winns HD220 boat 2 weeks ago with my comp time payout and overtime. I'm doing a killing with my Tesla stock so I'm hoping the boat didn't set me back too far. I buy my cars and toys with cash so if I don't have the cash, I don't buy it so it's a waiting game.
 

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Okay, couldn't stand it. Bought Tesla.
Tesla stock that is. And bought more GM while I was at it. Everything was on sale Monday.
 

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... must, resist...
 
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