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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an OBDII reader sitting around (somewhere) and I'm debating whether I should bother looking for it, getting torque pro, setting up the PID csv, and using it.
I'm curious to see how and why you guys use it.
What kind of information do you get out of it? And why you find it useful?
 

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I don't use one continuously and have yet to use the one I have on hand.

As long as obd scanners have been available for a decent price, I have had one. I always check the compatibility of my scanner against a new car, and if there is something more compatible or with additional features available, I upgrade.

Having a reader has come in handy many times in my car owning life for lots of awful societal and capitalistic realities of where I live. Similar to knowing which towns to never stop for gas in, and when to patch a tire and drive 50 miles away before getting it fixed.

Such is life.

I've considered setting up torque pro with one of my Bluetooth obd readers as just a geeky project. I haven't gotten around to it yet, and even if I do, I know I won't use it much outside of an actual perceived problem with the car.
 

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I have one going. Is it necessary? Not at all. It is just a geeky toy, mostly for entertainment.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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I've heard a lot of myths thrown around about EVs regarding battery degradation, range, and charging efficiency. I wanted to see if any of them is true, but that required actual measurements. So I bought and installed an OBD-II sensor from early on so that I can log all sorts of variables reported by the car. I record the numbers I track at the beginning and the end of all my driving sessions. Admittedly, it's not something a typical driver would do (or need to do) but as far as a hobby goes it's pretty entertaining and insightful. For an example, the charging efficiency is averaging at around 87.7%, which means 12.3% of the energy I paid for did not go into the battery.
 

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You didn't confine the question to the Bolt, or EVs. I have an UltraGauge in the Acura to keep an eye on when the car goes open/closed loop, monitor ignition advance since I sometimes blend my own gas (cheaper to get premium and regular than to let the pump do it for you), and set alarms for coolant temperature so I know if I've gone too aggressive with grill blocking, among other things.

In the Prius plug-in, I had setup a $40 tablet with Torque Pro to keep an eye on practically everything. Learning how to keep the engine off is almost an art in that car, and it helps to keep track of everything to maximize both performance and efficiency.

I'd probably go with Torque if I had an EV so I could track battery degradation, and perhaps to learn the particulars of various regen modes.
 

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I got it primarily to monitor the health of the 12V aux battery, and secondarily to monitor my min - max cell voltage spread for my own curiosity.
 

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It is a geeky project and was at the limits of my skills but I'd used Leaf Spy with the Leaf and I wanted the same info on the Bolt.

I use TorquePro primarily to track SOC and battery capacity. The latter for tracking degradation. I have a post on this website to that effect as well as my web site. I'll post a final report when we return the car at the end of the lease.

I also track charging of the starter battery as mine died--and the car with it a few days after getting the Bolt. It hasn't happened since but I keep an eye on it. I also check battery temp out of curiosity.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very interesting. Thank you everyone for the feeedback.
I'll see if I can dig up the OBD2 unit. Checking battery data sounds geeky and appealing indeed.
 
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