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Discussion Starter #1
It's an exhilarating car to drive but you only feel the initial G force of acceleration when you mesh the pedal then you don't feel it anymore.
I thought it's because of how flat the torque curve is and you don't feel the change in acceleration, like it runs out of steam, but from what I remember in physics classes, our body feels the changes in velocity. So the questions are:
1) the Bolt lacks the noise and the gear shift so sensorially, it doesn't feel fast after the initial boost.
2) the flat torque (constant G force) makes it feel like it stops accelerating
3) Our beloved Bolt is just "not that fast of a car"
 

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It sounds like you've gotten used to the acceleration. It happens quite quickly. This is the reason why the modding industry for ICE cars is worth such a large amount of money. Many people who mod their cars are quite addicted to the rush of faster and faster acceleration. After the initial rush, it gets more and more boring after each run. So thousands are spent to make the car, just a little bit faster. Most fast cars seem pedestrian to their owners. Don't worry, the Bolt is a quick car. Nowhere near supercar territory, but plenty quick compared to most of what's out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The acceleration is not constant but rather decreases rapidly from the initial peak. Here are some curves I made of max acceleration from zero to max speed for a few EVs.
I wonder how it compares to the graph for a relatively fast ICE car, like WRX or GTI.
Perhaps without the gear shift points, it doesn't feel fast after the initial G force.
I think it's also because EV acceleration decreases as ICE cars increases as they build up RPM's.
Bottomline, it's a fast commuter car but not in the same category as the hot hatches.
 

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The acceleration is not constant but rather decreases rapidly from the initial peak. Here are some curves I made of max acceleration from zero to max speed for a few EVs.
If the Bolt gets to 60 mph in just over 6.2 seconds, and has a maximum velocity of 92 mph, is that sharp drop to zero (acceleration) because it hit that max?

Oops. Just reread the post! Too sleepy at 5:20 am!
 

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I wonder how it compares to the graph for a relatively fast ICE car, like WRX or GTI.
Perhaps without the gear shift points, it doesn't feel fast after the initial G force.
I think it's also because EV acceleration decreases as ICE cars increases as they build up RPM's.
Bottomline, it's a fast commuter car but not in the same category as the hot hatches.
Argree. However, in normal driving, unless the ICEs are kept in lower gears manually, the Bolt is much quicker/faster/more responsive than the hot hatches mentioned. The EV torque is always right there, right now. , especially the turbo models and/or those with nine-speed transmissions always have that bit of lag while the turbo spools up and/or the tranny shifts down three gears.

Bottom line - I find the Bolt coming up beside other drivers before they expect it, more so than anything hot hatch I've driven lately. The other driver looked in his/her mirror some time ago and nothing was there, so he/she changes lanes or merges and I'm there. The Bolt requires more attention to other driver's possible actions. That instant response can have the Bolt where the typical ICE cars wouldn't be so soon.

Your opinions and results may vary.

jack vines
 

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The acceleration is not constant but rather decreases rapidly from the initial peak. Here are some curves I made of max acceleration from zero to max speed for a few EVs.
I don't have my own test results to dispute what you've recorded, but from what I've seen of the motor's torque curve and my seat-of-the-pants-ometer the rate of acceleration in the Bolt shouldn't start to fall off for a good 3+ seconds. The torque curve for the motor is dead flat for a big part of its range, then falls off as RPM increases, therefore because the Bolt has a single speed gearbox acceleration rate (and g-force) should be almost directly correlated to motor torque output. Wind resistance will put a bit of a slope on that flat acceleration rate as wheel speed increases, but not anywhere close to the amount shown in your graph.

Have a look at this page doing a similar study on the Spark EV. http://sparkev.blogspot.ca/2016/06/sparkev-performance-analysis.html

Those graphs show the car accelerating on a similar curve to the motor output.

One more thing, IIRC Chevy artificially limited motor torque output at low speeds to avoid wheel spin off the line. In my observation I've found this to be true as well with peak-torque (again SOTPometer) happening somewhere around 50-70kph
 

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I think an important point is being missed here. What humans feel isn't so much acceleration as jerk. Jerk is the rate of change in acceleration, just like acceleration is the rate of change in velocity. We can't sense velocity, either... unless there are other cues like trees going by the windows and our brains use that additional info to clue in motion.

That foot-down experience feels so amazing because you go from not accelerating at all to suddenly accelerating very rapidly. But then you're quickly into the smooth, nearly level power delivery of the electric motor and the jerk is gone.

An ICE, especially a high performance one, keeps building power as it climbs in revs, since it can't turn it all on instantly like an EV can.

You can try accelerating by steadily adding pressure to the go pedal instead of mashing it all at once -- might feel more like an ICE car, but it won't be as fast that way :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think an important point is being missed here. What humans feel isn't so much acceleration as jerk. Jerk is the rate of change in acceleration, just like acceleration is the rate of change in velocity. We can't sense velocity, either... unless there are other cues like trees going by the windows and our brains use that additional info to clue in motion.

That foot-down experience feels so amazing because you go from not accelerating at all to suddenly accelerating very rapidly. But then you're quickly into the smooth, nearly level power delivery of the electric motor and the jerk is gone.

An ICE, especially a high performance one, keeps building power as it climbs in revs, since it can't turn it all on instantly like an EV can.

You can try accelerating by steadily adding pressure to the go pedal instead of mashing it all at once -- might feel more like an ICE car, but it won't be as fast that way :)
I think the bottomline is, I want to figure out the best way to impress new non-EV passengers, since I rave about the car so much and try to convince the non-believers. And plus, my kids love the acceleration, my wife, not so much.

So far I find that meshing the pedal all at once doesn't feel as fast as steadily applying pressure.
 

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I like mine and am happy with the power it provides. What I like is that I can set cruise control to 60mph and just cruise without losing speed or having to downshift. This is what I enjoyed about my TDI but unlike the TDI I don't have to do oil changes or fill a gas tank. I don't miss the trips to the gas station at all.
 

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I had no trouble keeping up with the Tesla Model X, I encountered on the way to the Electric Drive Week event, on Sunday. I did have to drive 10 mph over the limit, something I haven't done in a decade, but it was worth it to pull in right next to him at the event. :)
 
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